God Loves You...And He Needs Money!

Seth
Aug 17, 2013 at 8:40 AM
2 years ago
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We simply must to do a show on tithing.  
I've heard this kind of thing my whole life.  The church parades a person or family that had little or nothing, was in debt or financial crisis, yet stepped out in faith to give 10% they actually couldn't afford.  
Of course, the story ends with a blessing of some kind.  "I got a bonus at work."  "I got an inheritance."  "I got a {ugh} tax refund."  Something like that.
This is not unlike casinos who post happy photographs of $10,000 slot winners, quietly skipping past the rows of hopeful would-be jackpot winners who left the property with empty pockets and, quite possibly, financial calamity.
Of course, the calling card here is "obedience."  God owns the cattle on a thousand hills (aka: everything) per Psalm 50:10, so tithers aren't actually giving anything to God.  They're returning to the storehouse what God already owns.  They're stewards of whatever income or possessions they enjoy, and the tithing of 10% is a demonstration of obedience and faith, and an opportunity for God to reward that obedience with some kind of supernatural favor.
As George Carlin so deftly stated, "He loves you and he needs money!"
What 

We simply must to do a podcast on tithing, as the topic is ripe for discussion.

All Christian News just released an article titled,
"Why Christians Should Continue Tithing Even When In Debt," and it asserts that even those facing bankruptcy should still tithe no less than 10%.

"You don't have it.  Now have faith and give it."

I
've heard this kind of thing my whole life.  The church parades a person or family that had little or nothing, was in debt or financial crisis, yet stepped out in faith to give 10% they actually couldn't afford.


Of course, the story ends with a blessing of some kind.  "I got a bonus at work."  "I got an inheritance."  "I got a {ugh} tax refund."  Something like that.

And those who give "offerings" beyond the baseline tithe are candidates for an even greater windfall.

This is not unlike the casinos who flash neon-circled signs of $10,000 slot winners, quietly skipping past the rows of hopeful would-be jackpot winners who left the property with empty pockets and, quite possibly, financial calamity.

 


Of course, the calling card here is "obedience."  God owns the cattle on a thousand hills (aka: everything) per Psalm 50:10, so tithers aren't actually giving anything to God.  They're returning to the storehouse what God already owns.  They're stewards of whatever income or possessions they enjoy, and the tithing of 10% is a demonstration of obedience and faith, and an opportunity for God to reward that obedience with some kind of supernatural favor.

Of course, God’s blessings are meted out in hugely disproportionate ways.  While one person might report an amazing and miraculous appearance of funds in the mailbox, dozens of others will receive either silence or the usual pile of bills.

Some churches preach a prosperity doctrine, promising earthly wealth for those who obediently fill the offering plate.  Other churches speak of financial sacrifice in this world so that wealth can be enjoyed in the next, all blessings sitting at the end of the road and waiting at the door of a heavenly mansion. 


offering plate


If all of this sounds like a scam, it only means that you’re paying attention.  As George Carlin so deftly observed about God, "He loves you and he needs money!"

Beware any organization that tells you to dig a hole and then stand in it.  Beware any promise of favor by someone selling a map to the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.  And beware an institution (the church) that acts like a business and treats its congregation members like customers ripe for a sale.

If God exists, he won’t need you to play the slots to become a winner.

-Seth Andrews

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