日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
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21-09-2011, 06:11 AM
RE: 日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
@ MAD

To train in a Japanese school first you need to have a recommendation from your sensei and then they have to agree to let you in. It is not so rare that you come to school with all that and they send you away, but usually it is to test how you behave in that situation. If you sit quietly and wait for your turn until they invite you in, you're in, but that can take hours, even days, if you came to some old-school sensei. It all depends on the school and their rules, the more traditional they are, the more trouble you will have to get in, or at least that is what I heard from my sensei, but it does make sense, considering the tradition and history of these schools. I have no idea about the rules of Ninjutsu, but I figure they are even more closed than Aikido, since it is supposed to be a secret martial art. Modern times, modern views, everything changes... It also depends on your sensei and how well he is known in Japan, how respected and how much does his word meant to them.

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21-09-2011, 06:27 AM
RE: 日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
I wouldn't know anything about the martial arts, but I can easily say from experience that modern Japan is really great! Big Grin Feudal Japan has a really romantic image attached to it, but from what I learned in classes they seemed like really terrible times... Tongue It's probably a controversial view amongst foreigners that like Japan, but I think Globalisation and "Westernisation" were really key in making Japan the extraordinary success it is today! They're still quite unique as I'm sure we would all agree, and still distinct from "Western" society, and at the same time they're open to outside influence and global community. Big Grin

It's a bit of philosophical irony that I see some of my friends and family say that Japan should have held on to their traditional individuality when the idea of glorified individuality is an extremely "Western" idea in the first place. Tongue It's of my personal belief that Japan is still definitely individual in its modern form and distinctly Japanese.

"It does feel like something to be wrong; it feels like being right." -Kathryn Schulz
I am 100% certain that I am wrong about something I am certain about right now. Because even if everything I stand for turns out to be completely true, I was still wrong about being wrong.
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21-09-2011, 08:45 PM
RE: 日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
Japan individual? Autonomous yes but they've never been about individuals that much, even now it's still a very group dynamic set. The best place in general to go in Japan is Kyoto, you can experience excessive tradition and the newest things in the same place. It is the epitome of Japan. When I went to Tokyo i was indeed surprised how much I liked it, since I expected to hate the big city. You'll probably see that it's just not the same in japan.

I'm not a big fan of the westernization, but because many things they borrowed just don't work for me (like separating the bathing >.>). When Nobunaga stormed the country with modern warfare he was considered a demon, but everyone still calls him by his given name because he was the creator of a better Japan, as ruthless as he was. The western additions have made a lot of improvements for life in Japan, remember that as in every other country most people are serfs and those serfs were treated like shit. If Japan had kept their traditions well you wouldn't even be thinking of going there and we wouldn't watch any of their movies. It sucked how their gates were forced open, but if it hadn't been done then none of us would really know anything about the wonderful place.

I'm not a non believer, I believe in the possibility of anything. I just don't let the actuality of something be determined by a 3rd party.
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22-09-2011, 06:00 AM
RE: 日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
I'm never a fan of isolationist policy. Tongue

You don't think Japan has a unique, Japanese individuality to it? o.o As far as society goes, it's definitely group-oriented, but I was meaning individual identity. My image of Japan is very distinct from my image of either North or South Korea or China.

I could never go in a public bath. Tongue That's just something I couldn't do. xD Hot springs, maaaaybe, but not the normal baths... Tongue

"It does feel like something to be wrong; it feels like being right." -Kathryn Schulz
I am 100% certain that I am wrong about something I am certain about right now. Because even if everything I stand for turns out to be completely true, I was still wrong about being wrong.
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22-09-2011, 07:27 AM (This post was last modified: 22-09-2011 07:32 AM by Lilith Pride.)
RE: 日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
I had to go to the public bath while it was closed cause I'm not male or female Q_Q

Also I just really have trouble using the word individual with Japan. Words like unique or autonomous seem more Japanese =p. Individuality is starting to gain ground in Japan but it's still very limited.

I've never known another place like Japan though if you're just a lover of Japanese products Korea sells them all cheaper.

It's odd that a country's largest sport can be fighting video games. South Korea the first country that had to actually set up detainment camps to get kids off of the MMORPGs.

I'm not a non believer, I believe in the possibility of anything. I just don't let the actuality of something be determined by a 3rd party.
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22-09-2011, 07:38 AM
RE: 日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
Quote:It's odd that a country's largest sport can be fighting video games.

omg, is it really? xD I understand why Japan and I have gotten along so well so far now... Tongue I love 2d Japanese-style fighting games! Tongue

"It does feel like something to be wrong; it feels like being right." -Kathryn Schulz
I am 100% certain that I am wrong about something I am certain about right now. Because even if everything I stand for turns out to be completely true, I was still wrong about being wrong.
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22-09-2011, 07:51 AM (This post was last modified: 22-09-2011 08:04 AM by Lilith Pride.)
RE: 日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
No no Kitty =p Japan likes regular sports. South Korea is the capitol of gaming. The Japanese video game and arcade scene is huge but they still put regular sports above it. Especially baseball >.>

Asian countries really love baseball.....

I say the best fighting game is King of fighters and yeah I love them too =p. It is lots of fun to go to an arcade in Akihabara even if you go primarily for the fan-service girls =p

I'm not a non believer, I believe in the possibility of anything. I just don't let the actuality of something be determined by a 3rd party.
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22-09-2011, 08:15 AM
RE: 日本は大好です! (I love Japan)
(22-09-2011 07:27 AM)Lilith Pride Wrote:  Also I just really have trouble using the word individual with Japan. Words like unique or autonomous seem more Japanese =p. Individuality is starting to gain ground in Japan but it's still very limited.

I fully agree here. Even when their kids rebel against the grown ups and the society they do it in groups :-D

Just take all the ganguro, they do dress and look very much different from the normal Japanese, but they still dress the same. When I was in Tokyo everyone was supposed to have grey hair I think, and that means everyone...

I also remember going to Yoyogi park, a very nice park where the kids from the different subcultures gathered on Sundays, there were groups of rockabilly-kids, all wearing leather jackets and a hair-do like Elvis, a few steps further away there was a group of girls dressed like nurses, and next to them a group of punks (is that how you say about people listening to punk music?) and so on...
Then, if you walked a bit into the park there were people who had brought their gigantic soundsystems into the park and where playing trance-music for anyone who wanted to dance a while. Usually this meant the people who had been out dancing all night and when the clubs started closing they went to Yoyogi (mostly westerners though)...
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