1,000 miles, but a world apart
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07-06-2013, 09:48 AM
1,000 miles, but a world apart
As some of you may know, I recently took a trip back down to my native state of Tennessee and my hometown for the first 18 years of my life in middle Tennessee. For the last 3 years or so, I have lived in the Northeast (central New York and Connecticut) and lived in Chattanooga, TN for 5 years prior to that.

Anyways, up until this last trip, I would have maintained that at least some part of me felt as though I was still connected to my native town in Middle Tennessee. Even though I would not have liked that idea, I still believed it to some degree. Not anymore though, so much so that I have taken to not calling it my hometown anymore. It is the antithesis of feeling 'at home' when I am there. It is where I am from and it is where most of family live, and nothing more any longer.

This may seem trivial to some, but it was huge for me. Why? I no longer feel that I am tied to a place that is full of close-minded individuals with small-minds and complacency for education. I couldn't turn the radio station without hearing conservative media talking about the homosexual agenda once! Some of the things that were said, were laughable. Some were infuriating. And some were downright nauseating. And I can now safely say, I don't have any real connection with that anymore. Even most of my family feels distant enough that I can safely say that. And the ones I am close with? They wouldn't say these types of things.

So, I raise my coffee cup Drinking Beverage high in one last toast to Tennessee and say "fuck you."

Except Chattanooga. I do miss that town and would go back. So, maybe I should revise that to say "fuck you bassackwerds Southern World."

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07-06-2013, 10:36 AM
RE: 1,000 miles, but a world apart
That's good to hear. Where you're born is an accident of birth and, just a place on the planet.

There can be no virtue in accidents or locations, so there's no reason to honor them.

Egor just left because some of us refuse to honor the concept "America".

The beginning of wisdom is to call things by their right names. - Chinese Proverb
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07-06-2013, 11:14 AM
RE: 1,000 miles, but a world apart
It could be a few blocks but a world apart, in any big city I've lived in.

Nonsense is nonsense, but the history of nonsense is a very important science.
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07-06-2013, 08:39 PM
RE: 1,000 miles, but a world apart
BeardedDude, I can relate. I left the small town where I grew up years ago and have no sense of connection with it. I'm middle aged so the high-school nostalgia is long gone (I never had it to begin with, was glad to be done with that!) I'm still in the south and am where I'm at until my son is grown and I get enough years in to retire. I moved around a lot in my 20s and 30s and so didn't have a sense of roots or whatever. Also my family was poor growing up, so there is no family land or ancestral home to pull me anywhere.
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08-06-2013, 11:05 AM (This post was last modified: 09-06-2013 12:59 AM by JAH.)
RE: 1,000 miles, but a world apart
I am not sure why this is in politics section (well I think I know but it is speculation), but I can respond from a different point of view.

I am so lucky. I currently live about 2 miles from the hospital I was born in. I will be soon be moving to about 40 miles from that hospital. I have spent the entirety of my 66 years, with the exception of about 3 years, in San Mateo, Alemeda, San Francisco and Marin counties.

The San Francisco Bay Area is an area that is diverse and welcoming to multiple people. I think I have related the story here of making a detailed argument about how god was a human construct on the way to the bar and being told by the first person I approached "tell me something I don't know".

The area is physically beautiful and interesting in a variety of ways. I may be to a certain extent a homebody. But, I do like my home.
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08-06-2013, 11:25 AM
RE: 1,000 miles, but a world apart
I agree with Jah, it depends on the city not the state. I grew up in Dallas, Texas and most people there are extreme, there is no in between. One can very easily go to a redneck bar where everyone is nice to strangers of all kinds yet tell racist jokes at the same time, then one can go to see some former black panther dudes that have had shootouts with the FBI, then drive by a mosque and a church that are both the size of an average shopping mall.

I live in Portland Oregon right now, which is just boring whiteville, very little diversity in an ironically so called liberal city and state.
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08-06-2013, 11:37 AM
RE: 1,000 miles, but a world apart
I spent from the age of 11 into my 20s in a small farming community in eastern Iowa. I spent time there before that because I had grandparents there and it is my dad's hometown.

My years prior were spent in college towns. I was used to some diversity and just a different general vibe, for lack of a better word. Moving to D-ville and getting thrown into Catholic school in an area that was/is well over 90 percent Catholic threw me for a loop. I never felt at home there and I have had people over the years tell me I didn't belong there (not in a bad way, but that it wasn't the best place for me).

In 2009 when we went to sprinkle some of dad's ashes on what had been the family farm, I also said my goodbyes to the town. That chapter closed a long time ago but there was finally a "The End" to finish things.

It can be a sad thing and relief at the same time to let go of a place. I no longer claim it as my hometown. I totally get that.

I’m not anti-social. I’m pro-solitude. ~Author Unknown
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23-06-2013, 03:08 PM (This post was last modified: 24-06-2013 10:59 PM by Full Circle.)
RE: 1,000 miles, but a world apart
We have something else in common other than digging in the dirt for fossils TBD.

For four years I lived in small rural Tennessee town in the middle of the triangle formed by Nashville, Knoxville and Chattanooga. I've always had fond memories of it.

Recently one of my friends from back then found me on FB. I've looked at his FB and several of my other acquaintances from then and its all about the Bible and God.

So here's to assbackwards nonthinking Drinking Beverage ! Fuck you and good riddance.

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"Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.” ~ Ambrose Bierce
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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