10% is a lot of dough.
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16-02-2013, 02:56 PM (This post was last modified: 16-02-2013 03:09 PM by Logisch.)
10% is a lot of dough.
A thought crossed my mind today... if the average person really pays 10% of their income... how much do they spend or give to a church?

Let's assume that someone only pays 10% ONCE a month (let's say once out of two paychecks). Let's assume it's a fairly standard take home of $1350 (I think that'd put you in the range of $650/bimonthly).

So if you give 10% once a month that's $65. Now, let's multiply that by twelve.
$780.

What can you do with $780? Well... for some that's a mortgage payment, insurance for half (or a year) a year or even groceries for several months. Food for a local cannery that feeds the homeless or whatever. Shit, i can think of a fuckton of things I can do with $780.

That's only if the person gives 10% of their check once a month, not every check, biweekly. If they're a "good giver" and they give all, that number doubles.

$1,560. Fuck.

Want to make that more fun? In ten years you've given one year of your wages away. Literally if you sat on your ass and did your job to give an entire year of wages away. Gone. $15,600. If the average person lives give or take let's say 30,000 days, and the average person starts paying 10% once they are old enough to have such a supportive job (Let's assume you're 20)... and you pay for the remaining years you are alive 10% every paycheck to your church, that's about 22,700 days remaining, or 62 years. Assuming you made the same wage and it never changed and you made only $1350 take home per month paying in 10% of your income over your life time you would be giving:

$96,720 (You could buy a house for your church, or a large chunk of your retirement, or a whole shit ton of local support for charities that actually do shit)

Think about that for a minute. Now...

Imagine how many people go to said church. Calculate that maybe even if 100 members are present, and only 10-15% of those give each sunday... how much money that is. Just think about it.
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16-02-2013, 03:31 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
(16-02-2013 02:56 PM)Logisch Wrote:  A thought crossed my mind today... if the average person really pays 10% of their income... how much do they spend or give to a church?

Let's assume that someone only pays 10% ONCE a month (let's say once out of two paychecks). Let's assume it's a fairly standard take home of $1350 (I think that'd put you in the range of $650/bimonthly).

So if you give 10% once a month that's $65. Now, let's multiply that by twelve.
$780.

What can you do with $780? Well... for some that's a mortgage payment, insurance for half (or a year) a year or even groceries for several months. Food for a local cannery that feeds the homeless or whatever. Shit, i can think of a fuckton of things I can do with $780.

That's only if the person gives 10% of their check once a month, not every check, biweekly. If they're a "good giver" and they give all, that number doubles.

$1,560. Fuck.

Want to make that more fun? In ten years you've given one year of your wages away. Literally if you sat on your ass and did your job to give an entire year of wages away. Gone. $15,600. If the average person lives give or take let's say 30,000 days, and the average person starts paying 10% once they are old enough to have such a supportive job (Let's assume you're 20)... and you pay for the remaining years you are alive 10% every paycheck to your church, that's about 22,700 days remaining, or 62 years. Assuming you made the same wage and it never changed and you made only $1350 take home per month paying in 10% of your income over your life time you would be giving:

$96,720 (You could buy a house for your church, or a large chunk of your retirement, or a whole shit ton of local support for charities that actually do shit)

Think about that for a minute. Now...

Imagine how many people go to said church. Calculate that maybe even if 100 members are present, and only 10-15% of those give each sunday... how much money that is. Just think about it.
I wish someone would pay me that much a year to tell faerie tales to morons. Sad
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16-02-2013, 04:03 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
Think of the money you'll save for car insurance!

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16-02-2013, 04:12 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
I'd say that depends on whether that is 10% of net or gross income. Net would produce a significantly less than gross.

On a spin of this topic, the Hasidic jews are notorious for using these kind of tax loopholes. Basically the Synagogue buys the house, then the family buys the house from the Synagogue and hosts "worship" gatherings, meaning that not only are they not paying the initial tax for the purchase, but also they do not pay property tax since they argue that the home is a "place of worship".

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16-02-2013, 04:17 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
(16-02-2013 04:12 PM)DeathsNotoriousAngel Wrote:  I'd say that depends on whether that is 10% of net or gross income. Net would produce a significantly less than gross.

On a spin of this topic, the Hasidic jews are notorious for using these kind of tax loopholes. Basically the Synagogue buys the house, then the family buys the house from the Synagogue and hosts "worship" gatherings, meaning that not only are they not paying the initial tax for the purchase, but also they do not pay property tax since they argue that the home is a "place of worship".
I said take home pay, meaning net.

That's assuming the gross is somewhere in the $20k-ish per year.

I wanted to use an "in the middle" lower pay example. Imagine what the middle class home would be contributing with 10%? And the tax thing you just mentioned is new, never heard that before. Tax exempt from property tax for a house being a place of worship? man that is infuriating!
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16-02-2013, 04:21 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
(16-02-2013 04:17 PM)Logisch Wrote:  
(16-02-2013 04:12 PM)DeathsNotoriousAngel Wrote:  I'd say that depends on whether that is 10% of net or gross income. Net would produce a significantly less than gross.

On a spin of this topic, the Hasidic jews are notorious for using these kind of tax loopholes. Basically the Synagogue buys the house, then the family buys the house from the Synagogue and hosts "worship" gatherings, meaning that not only are they not paying the initial tax for the purchase, but also they do not pay property tax since they argue that the home is a "place of worship".
I said take home pay, meaning net.

That's assuming the gross is somewhere in the $20k-ish per year.

I wanted to use an "in the middle" lower pay example. Imagine what the middle class home would be contributing with 10%? And the tax thing you just mentioned is new, never heard that before. Tax exempt from property tax for a house being a place of worship? man that is infuriating!
That's New Jersey my friend.

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16-02-2013, 04:47 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
*Runs off to start a church*

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16-02-2013, 04:52 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
(16-02-2013 04:17 PM)Logisch Wrote:  
(16-02-2013 04:12 PM)DeathsNotoriousAngel Wrote:  I'd say that depends on whether that is 10% of net or gross income. Net would produce a significantly less than gross.

On a spin of this topic, the Hasidic jews are notorious for using these kind of tax loopholes. Basically the Synagogue buys the house, then the family buys the house from the Synagogue and hosts "worship" gatherings, meaning that not only are they not paying the initial tax for the purchase, but also they do not pay property tax since they argue that the home is a "place of worship".
I said take home pay, meaning net.

That's assuming the gross is somewhere in the $20k-ish per year.

I wanted to use an "in the middle" lower pay example. Imagine what the middle class home would be contributing with 10%? And the tax thing you just mentioned is new, never heard that before. Tax exempt from property tax for a house being a place of worship? man that is infuriating!
Net income my arse...pastor always emphasised that it must be gross income, and I know a lot of other churches say that too. Remember also that a tithe is only that first 10%...on top of that there are "offerings", which is also expected, and then on top of that there are the "special burdens" such as giving for the poor familys etc (tithe is not generally used for charities in my experience).

Anyway that was my experience going to a pentecostal church.

So we can probably add in the same ammount again for the "offerings", then another 5% or so for the "special burdens"...oh and if you miss a tithe it is taught that you must pay it back + 20%

And if you don't give...God will curse you.
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16-02-2013, 07:56 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
Do people really give 10% willingly? Maybe I know a lot of cheapskates, but I think my relatives and friends of the family (all Catholics) put about $2 in the collection basket every week. Hell, my mom would hold a single dollar bill in a fist so no one would see the amount and drop it in quickly. She'd give me about 35 cents a week to put in the basket, back when I went to church (I stopped attending when I was 8 years old).
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16-02-2013, 08:35 PM
RE: 10% is a lot of dough.
It depends which church you go to and how deep in you are.

I think Pentecostals are generally more hardcore and tend to give way more than 10%...I was in that group and quite serious about it.

We have churches in Australia like c3 and in NZ like Destiny who actually enforce tithing, and it is quite common to teach that you will go to hell for not doing so...the Pastors in those churches also tend to drive expensive cars, have two houses and a boat too.
If I didn't tithe one week I would get a phone call or an email asking why, and I went along with it because I thought that our church performed quite a bit of charity work and needed the money. When I worked it out though, they were pulling in way more than was going out in charity work. I walked away about two years ago now, but most christians I knew were quite serious about tithing, and most gave about 20% of their income each week.
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