10%-ish as what I know: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
03-07-2014, 01:31 AM
10%-ish true: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
Writing for Washington Post seems pretty easy sometimes ...

What I got from search engine returns is that it is forbidden, or not recommended, for CPC members, government officials, teachers and students to participate in the Ramadan fast by some local authorities in Xin Jiang.

CPC members have vowed to take the philosophy of matter over mind. It is ridiculous for a CPC member to be religious.

As for government officials, teachers and students, they have their own duties and responsibilities, due to which fasting from dawn to dust is not a wise choice.

Ill-advised ? Ha ...

------

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worl...n-ramadan/

China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan

By Adam Taylor July 2 at 8:54 AM

Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and prayer, is just beginning. But for many Muslims in the Chinese Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, it may not even start.

During Ramadan, pious Muslims are expected to fast from dusk until dawn. However, according to Agence France-Presse, numerous official Web sites in Xinjiang are posting notices that are discouraging Muslims from fasting during Ramadan. The statements appear to indicate that government officials, teachers and children are all being restricted from the traditional Islamic practice.

One local Web site features Uighur Muslims in traditional dress eating a large meal, for example. "Although the meal coincided with the Muslim festival of Ramadan, the cadres who took part expressed a positive attitude and will lead the non-fasting," the accompanying article reads, according to AFP's translation.

An image from the Web site of the state office which manages the Tarim River basin which shows Uighur Muslims eating during Ramadan.

China is officially an atheist country, and many religious or spiritual groups face some sort of persecution, whether it is the Christian "house churches," where worshiping is prohibited, or the Falun Gong spiritual movement, which is banned outright.

Islam, and in particular the Uighur Muslims, represent a special problem, however. For years, members of the Uighur minority, ethnically Turkic and distinct from China's dominant Han ethnic group, have complained of repression. Over the past few years, terrorist attacks apparently perpetrated by ethnic Uighur extremists have become more frequent and often gruesomely spectacular. In May, for example, attackers killed at least 31 people in a bomb attack in the market area of Urumqi, Xinjiang's capital city. Even Beijing, far from the western areas where Uighurs mostly live, isn't safe: In October of last year, three men said to be Uighurs drove a car through the crowds at Tiananmen Square, killing five people including those in the car.

Ramadan is one of the most important periods on the Muslim calender, and there have been reports that the Xinjiang government has placed restrictions on Ramadan for the past few years, though officials usually deny these accusations. In 2012, Hou Hanmin, a spokeswoman for the Xinjiang government, told the state newspaper Global Times that "authorities do encourage residents to eat properly for study and work purposes, but do not force people to eat during Ramadan."

That may be true, but the practice is still problematic. Discouraging fasting may seem like relatively minor repression, but it's just one thing on a long list of cultural slights: razing the historic Old Town of Kashgar or downgrading the status of the Uighur language, for example. And that's ignoring the heavy police response to protests and militancy -- Human Rights Watch is just one group that has drawn attention to mass arrests and disappearances of Uighur people.

As my colleague Ishaan Tharoor pointed out recently, China's terrorism problem seems to be getting worse, and two of the biggest reasons are the repression and marginalization of the Uighur people. It seems unlikely that clamping down on Ramadan -- again -- will make that any better.
Adam Taylor writes about foreign affairs for The Washington Post. Originally from London, he studied at the University of Manchester and Columbia University.

Want something? Then do something.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
03-07-2014, 07:41 AM
RE: 10%-ish as what I know: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
You're a retard and China is shit country with a poor human rights record.

[Image: oscar.png]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
03-07-2014, 08:57 PM
RE: 10%-ish true: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
@DLJ just noticed that I duplicated this thread. Would you please delete this one ?

Want something? Then do something.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
03-07-2014, 09:03 PM
RE: 10%-ish true: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
I hate China, as it is right now, destroying Tibet, and killing the Tibetan Culture, and lately the people. It feels like Nazis clearing out ethnic Poland for German colonization- but Germany didn't supply literally all of our goods.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
03-07-2014, 11:49 PM
RE: 10%-ish as what I know: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
(03-07-2014 09:03 PM)Rinpoche Wrote:  I hate China, as it is right now, destroying Tibet, and killing the Tibetan Culture, and lately the people. It feels like Nazis clearing out ethnic Poland for German colonization- but Germany didn't supply literally all of our goods.

I really hope that people like you can live up to your hatred, so that I will have the chance to thank you on Thanksgiving.

I wish you could have the intelligence to understand what I said above.

Want something? Then do something.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
04-07-2014, 12:50 AM
RE: 10%-ish as what I know: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
The most effective way to influence behaviour is through $$$.

Societies have tried moral incentives (see Cafia Church) and social incentives (see National Socialist propaganda; pop-culture / peer pressure; no vodka is allowed to be sold on the first day of the month in Mongolia, etc.) but financial penalties and incentives work best:

Wanna trade with the Romans? You gotta sign up to our rules.
Various forms of taxation and pricing e.g. incentives for having more (or less) children.
How much do you want for kidney?
Etc.

I think it's about time that China used its trade influence to promote atheism more.

They should ban burka for starters... not by declaring it not exempt from the national security policy but simple by saying, "Do you want cheap products? No problem, just put your signature next to this bit of the contract where it says you are NOT a muslim."

Same for any openly registered christian organisation... A Chick-fil-A in Hong Kong? Sure. See this non-affiliation clause?

Thumbsup

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
04-07-2014, 03:25 AM
RE: 10%-ish as what I know: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
(04-07-2014 12:50 AM)DLJ Wrote:  The most effective way to influence behaviour is through $$$.

Societies have tried moral incentives (see Cafia Church) and social incentives (see National Socialist propaganda; pop-culture / peer pressure; no vodka is allowed to be sold on the first day of the month in Mongolia, etc.) but financial penalties and incentives work best:

Wanna trade with the Romans? You gotta sign up to our rules.
Various forms of taxation and pricing e.g. incentives for having more (or less) children.
How much do you want for kidney?
Etc.

I think it's about time that China used its trade influence to promote atheism more.

They should ban burka for starters... not by declaring it not exempt from the national security policy but simple by saying, "Do you want cheap products? No problem, just put your signature next to this bit of the contract where it says you are NOT a muslim."

Same for any openly registered christian organisation... A Chick-fil-A in Hong Kong? Sure. See this non-affiliation clause?

Thumbsup

A deal was made about 64 years ago when the Chinese Catholic branch published an Three-Self Announcement (meaning independent missionary work, finance and administration) and was granted a legitimate status. Since the reform and opening up of China in the 1980s, local and central government have been extensively subsidizing major religious groups that seem mild. There are the Minorities and Religious Affairs Ministry and its branches on different levels of government, whose officials quite often use their authorities to unfairly speak for minorities and those religious to quench conflicts between them and those who are Han or non-religious. And it's been like this for quite some time, long enough to make some religious extremists to think that their needs and requests are special.

People get disappointed when what was promised to them was not met eventually. So it is no wonder quite many have turned to religions for solace after the illusion of communistic good life promised to them in the 1950s was gradually grinded down in the 1960s and 70s. Now in Northern China, according to an academic report, only about 35%-40% of the population is estimated to be non-religious. Those non-religious ones even includes those cult believers because cult isn't deemed as religion in that study.

So, you can see the difficulty in continue making such generous deals especially when they are growing both in number and appetite.

Yet similar to how natural and man-made clamaties have made many renounce things they once fanatically believed, where China currently stands also make many by virtue of what are we here.

To me, one such thing is to stop begging for mercy and to stand up firm on my own feet. So, though I also wish those seriously religious' extremism could be bought or traded, knowing that they are those who sold themselves to an invisible guy and can't stand on their own feet, I hope more actually work could be done like banning religious activity in schools and universities, as well as restricting its influence in government.

Want something? Then do something.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes HU.Junyuan's post
04-07-2014, 06:14 AM
RE: 10%-ish as what I know: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
(04-07-2014 12:50 AM)DLJ Wrote:  The most effective way to influence behaviour is through $$$.

Societies have tried moral incentives (see Cafia Church) and social incentives (see National Socialist propaganda; pop-culture / peer pressure; no vodka is allowed to be sold on the first day of the month in Mongolia, etc.) but financial penalties and incentives work best:

Wanna trade with the Romans? You gotta sign up to our rules.
Various forms of taxation and pricing e.g. incentives for having more (or less) children.
How much do you want for kidney?
Etc.

I think it's about time that China used its trade influence to promote atheism more.

They should ban burka for starters... not by declaring it not exempt from the national security policy but simple by saying, "Do you want cheap products? No problem, just put your signature next to this bit of the contract where it says you are NOT a muslim."

Same for any openly registered christian organisation... A Chick-fil-A in Hong Kong? Sure. See this non-affiliation clause?

Thumbsup

Except it doesn't work that way because 1) Chinese are fake atheists and the only reason they're considered atheists is because the communist party isn't an invisible man in the sky and 2) You say it yourself, money is a great incentive. "You want our money China? sell us your cheap goods" Drinking Beverage

edit: Yes! :cup: works now. Winning.

[Image: oscar.png]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
04-07-2014, 07:00 AM
RE: 10%-ish as what I know: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
(03-07-2014 01:31 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  Writing for Washington Post seems pretty easy sometimes ...

What I got from search engine returns is that it is forbidden, or not recommended, for CPC members, government officials, teachers and students to participate in the Ramadan fast by some local authorities in Xin Jiang.

CPC members have vowed to take the philosophy of matter over mind. It is ridiculous for a CPC member to be religious.

As for government officials, teachers and students, they have their own duties and responsibilities, due to which fasting from dawn to dust is not a wise choice.

Ill-advised ? Ha ...

------

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worl...n-ramadan/

China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan

By Adam Taylor July 2 at 8:54 AM

Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and prayer, is just beginning. But for many Muslims in the Chinese Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, it may not even start.

During Ramadan, pious Muslims are expected to fast from dusk until dawn. However, according to Agence France-Presse, numerous official Web sites in Xinjiang are posting notices that are discouraging Muslims from fasting during Ramadan. The statements appear to indicate that government officials, teachers and children are all being restricted from the traditional Islamic practice.

One local Web site features Uighur Muslims in traditional dress eating a large meal, for example. "Although the meal coincided with the Muslim festival of Ramadan, the cadres who took part expressed a positive attitude and will lead the non-fasting," the accompanying article reads, according to AFP's translation.

An image from the Web site of the state office which manages the Tarim River basin which shows Uighur Muslims eating during Ramadan.

China is officially an atheist country, and many religious or spiritual groups face some sort of persecution, whether it is the Christian "house churches," where worshiping is prohibited, or the Falun Gong spiritual movement, which is banned outright.

Islam, and in particular the Uighur Muslims, represent a special problem, however. For years, members of the Uighur minority, ethnically Turkic and distinct from China's dominant Han ethnic group, have complained of repression. Over the past few years, terrorist attacks apparently perpetrated by ethnic Uighur extremists have become more frequent and often gruesomely spectacular. In May, for example, attackers killed at least 31 people in a bomb attack in the market area of Urumqi, Xinjiang's capital city. Even Beijing, far from the western areas where Uighurs mostly live, isn't safe: In October of last year, three men said to be Uighurs drove a car through the crowds at Tiananmen Square, killing five people including those in the car.

Ramadan is one of the most important periods on the Muslim calender, and there have been reports that the Xinjiang government has placed restrictions on Ramadan for the past few years, though officials usually deny these accusations. In 2012, Hou Hanmin, a spokeswoman for the Xinjiang government, told the state newspaper Global Times that "authorities do encourage residents to eat properly for study and work purposes, but do not force people to eat during Ramadan."

That may be true, but the practice is still problematic. Discouraging fasting may seem like relatively minor repression, but it's just one thing on a long list of cultural slights: razing the historic Old Town of Kashgar or downgrading the status of the Uighur language, for example. And that's ignoring the heavy police response to protests and militancy -- Human Rights Watch is just one group that has drawn attention to mass arrests and disappearances of Uighur people.

As my colleague Ishaan Tharoor pointed out recently, China's terrorism problem seems to be getting worse, and two of the biggest reasons are the repression and marginalization of the Uighur people. It seems unlikely that clamping down on Ramadan -- again -- will make that any better.
Adam Taylor writes about foreign affairs for The Washington Post. Originally from London, he studied at the University of Manchester and Columbia University.

So... How's about them religious freedoms...

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
"Anti-environmentalism is like standing in front of a forest and going 'quick kill them they're coming right for us!'" - Jake Farr-Wharton, The Imaginary Friend Show.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
04-07-2014, 07:14 AM
RE: 10%-ish as what I know: China launches ill-advised crackdown on Ramadan
(03-07-2014 11:49 PM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  
(03-07-2014 09:03 PM)Rinpoche Wrote:  I hate China, as it is right now, destroying Tibet, and killing the Tibetan Culture, and lately the people. It feels like Nazis clearing out ethnic Poland for German colonization- but Germany didn't supply literally all of our goods.

I really hope that people like you can live up to your hatred, so that I will have the chance to thank you on Thanksgiving.

I wish you could have the intelligence to understand what I said above.

Could you please elaborate?
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: