100 years later - remembering world war 1
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
22-01-2014, 09:57 AM
100 years later - remembering world war 1
One of my favorite megazines has a few weeks ago started publishing a series on the 100 year anniversery of the outbrake of ww1. The articles summerise the events and shows some developments that took place after the war.
It is divided into several parts published seperatly in each edition. For the history interested like me, I`ll leave the links here:

1:

Quote: Disaster Centennial: The Disturbing Relevance of World War I

It has now been 100 years since the outbreak of World War I, but the European catastrophe remains relevant today. As the Continent looks back this year, old wounds could once again be rubbed raw.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...41523.html

2:

Quote: Great War Centenary: Britain's Careful Celebration of WWI

The Great War has long played a significant role in Britain's historical memory. This year, the country is planning several events to celebrate the 100th anniversary and several new books have already hit the shelves. Jingoism, however, is to be avoided.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...43645.html

3:

Quote: The Bosnian Knot: Conflicts Unchanged in Birthplace of WWI

The 1914 assassination of Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo came in the midst of a bitter power struggle among major European powers in the Balkans. One hundred years and three devastating wars later, peace still eludes the multi-ethnic region.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/euro...42482.html

4:

Quote: World War I Centenary: The Symbolic Power of French Victory

The passionate commemoration of World War I is a vital element of France's contemporary national cohesion. But before a momentous turning point in August 1914, the country looked to be on the brink of defeat.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...43412.html

5:

Quote: Stolen Triumph: Russia Revisits Pivotal Role in World War I

Getty Images

At the beginning of World War I, Russia was a member of the Triple Entente, which went on to win the conflict. By then, however, the Russian czarist empire had vanished and the war was swept under the historical rug. Putin is now bringing it back.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...42500.html

6:

Still to come: How the US engaged in the role of world police for the first time, only to then retreat after victory, into focusing on domestic issues.

(22-05-2014 06:23 PM)Jeremy E Walker Wrote:  I abstain from all forms of sexual acts.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like The Germans are coming's post
22-01-2014, 10:03 AM
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
Yup.

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
22-01-2014, 10:04 AM
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
(22-01-2014 10:03 AM)cjlr Wrote:  Yup.

and now?

(22-05-2014 06:23 PM)Jeremy E Walker Wrote:  I abstain from all forms of sexual acts.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
22-01-2014, 10:23 AM
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
(22-01-2014 10:04 AM)The Germans are coming Wrote:  
(22-01-2014 10:03 AM)cjlr Wrote:  Yup.

and now?

What, 99 years ago?

The Ottomans joined the war November 1914, but the next major player (Italy) joined later (May 1915).

The Serbian front was ironically fairly quiet through the winter of 1914-1915; the Austrians didn't want to waste effort on a sideshow (nevermind that Serbia was the nominal cause for it all).

By that winter the race to the sea had ended in the West; Marne and Ypres were over, and Artois petering out. And again not much happened until spring...

The Russians captured Galicia from Austria-Hungary and occupied it, but the fighting stalled in the Carpathians over the winter.

Said success caused the Germans to put a little more into the East than they'd planned (since their entire strategy was based on taking care of France first). But the Prussian campaign was Russia's to lose and did they ever. A cock-up for the ages, with a huge portion of the pre-war trained army annihilated at Tannenberg and Masuria. But the Germans were still much more busy out West and didn't pursue very far into Poland.

The first Canadian forces were mobilized immediately and trickled into the UK over the remainder of 1914. What became the First Canadian Division (including men from my hometown, my parents' hometowns, and my current home) was officially constituted on January 26 1915 and left for France in February.

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
22-01-2014, 03:17 PM
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
Blackadder remembers how WWI started:



Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like ghostexorcist's post
23-01-2014, 07:37 PM
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
For anyone really interested in WWI, I highly recommend The Guns of August by Barbara W. Tuchman. It is considered the preeiminent work on the topic and, even after 50 years, still holds up against most any work on the topic.

Shackle their minds when they're bent on the cross
When ignorance reigns, life is lost
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
24-01-2014, 02:00 AM
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
(22-01-2014 09:57 AM)The Germans are coming Wrote:  One of my favorite megazines has a few weeks ago started publishing a series on the 100 year anniversery of the outbrake of ww1. The articles summerise the events and shows some developments that took place after the war.
It is divided into several parts published seperatly in each edition. For the history interested like me, I`ll leave the links here:

1:

Quote: Disaster Centennial: The Disturbing Relevance of World War I

It has now been 100 years since the outbreak of World War I, but the European catastrophe remains relevant today. As the Continent looks back this year, old wounds could once again be rubbed raw.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...41523.html

2:

Quote: Great War Centenary: Britain's Careful Celebration of WWI

The Great War has long played a significant role in Britain's historical memory. This year, the country is planning several events to celebrate the 100th anniversary and several new books have already hit the shelves. Jingoism, however, is to be avoided.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...43645.html

3:

Quote: The Bosnian Knot: Conflicts Unchanged in Birthplace of WWI

The 1914 assassination of Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo came in the midst of a bitter power struggle among major European powers in the Balkans. One hundred years and three devastating wars later, peace still eludes the multi-ethnic region.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/euro...42482.html

4:

Quote: World War I Centenary: The Symbolic Power of French Victory

The passionate commemoration of World War I is a vital element of France's contemporary national cohesion. But before a momentous turning point in August 1914, the country looked to be on the brink of defeat.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...43412.html

5:

Quote: Stolen Triumph: Russia Revisits Pivotal Role in World War I

Getty Images

At the beginning of World War I, Russia was a member of the Triple Entente, which went on to win the conflict. By then, however, the Russian czarist empire had vanished and the war was swept under the historical rug. Putin is now bringing it back.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...42500.html

6:

Still to come: How the US engaged in the role of world police for the first time, only to then retreat after victory, into focusing on domestic issues.


Thanks for the links, they are a good read. Thumbsup

[Image: GrumpyCat_01.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-01-2014, 01:25 AM
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
(22-01-2014 10:23 AM)cjlr Wrote:  
(22-01-2014 10:04 AM)The Germans are coming Wrote:  and now?

What, 99 years ago?

The Ottomans joined the war November 1914, but the next major player (Italy) joined later (May 1915).

The Serbian front was ironically fairly quiet through the winter of 1914-1915; the Austrians didn't want to waste effort on a sideshow (nevermind that Serbia was the nominal cause for it all).

By that winter the race to the sea had ended in the West; Marne and Ypres were over, and Artois petering out. And again not much happened until spring...

The Russians captured Galicia from Austria-Hungary and occupied it, but the fighting stalled in the Carpathians over the winter.

Said success caused the Germans to put a little more into the East than they'd planned (since their entire strategy was based on taking care of France first). But the Prussian campaign was Russia's to lose and did they ever. A cock-up for the ages, with a huge portion of the pre-war trained army annihilated at Tannenberg and Masuria. But the Germans were still much more busy out West and didn't pursue very far into Poland.

The first Canadian forces were mobilized immediately and trickled into the UK over the remainder of 1914. What became the First Canadian Division (including men from my hometown, my parents' hometowns, and my current home) was officially constituted on January 26 1915 and left for France in February.

Wait, are you saying that WW1 was Canada's first war?
What about the Bore War? New Zealand troops fought in the Bore War, surely Canadian troops did also.

I don't talk gay, I don't walk gay, it's like people don't even know I'm gay unless I'm blowing them.
[Image: 10h27hu.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-01-2014, 03:02 AM
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
(28-01-2014 01:25 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  
(22-01-2014 10:23 AM)cjlr Wrote:  What, 99 years ago?

The Ottomans joined the war November 1914, but the next major player (Italy) joined later (May 1915).

The Serbian front was ironically fairly quiet through the winter of 1914-1915; the Austrians didn't want to waste effort on a sideshow (nevermind that Serbia was the nominal cause for it all).

By that winter the race to the sea had ended in the West; Marne and Ypres were over, and Artois petering out. And again not much happened until spring...

The Russians captured Galicia from Austria-Hungary and occupied it, but the fighting stalled in the Carpathians over the winter.

Said success caused the Germans to put a little more into the East than they'd planned (since their entire strategy was based on taking care of France first). But the Prussian campaign was Russia's to lose and did they ever. A cock-up for the ages, with a huge portion of the pre-war trained army annihilated at Tannenberg and Masuria. But the Germans were still much more busy out West and didn't pursue very far into Poland.

The first Canadian forces were mobilized immediately and trickled into the UK over the remainder of 1914. What became the First Canadian Division (including men from my hometown, my parents' hometowns, and my current home) was officially constituted on January 26 1915 and left for France in February.

Wait, are you saying that WW1 was Canada's first war?
What about the Bore War? New Zealand troops fought in the Bore War, surely Canadian troops did also.

I don't see him saying that WWI was Canada's first war; only that the First Canadian Division was formed then. The FCD was formation of the Canadian Expeditionary Force; basically a military force deployed in a foreign nation.

Also, in point of fact: Canadian forces were deployed by the British Empire during the Second Boer War. Over 7,000 Canadian soldiers and support personnel were involved in the second Boer war from October 1899 to May 1902. Prior to WWI, it was the largest military action undertaken by Canadian forces.

A single action is worth more than the words it takes to describe it.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Free Thought's post
30-01-2014, 08:21 PM (This post was last modified: 30-01-2014 08:25 PM by Brownshirt.)
RE: 100 years later - remembering world war 1
(28-01-2014 01:25 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  
(22-01-2014 10:23 AM)cjlr Wrote:  What, 99 years ago?

The Ottomans joined the war November 1914, but the next major player (Italy) joined later (May 1915).

The Serbian front was ironically fairly quiet through the winter of 1914-1915; the Austrians didn't want to waste effort on a sideshow (nevermind that Serbia was the nominal cause for it all).

By that winter the race to the sea had ended in the West; Marne and Ypres were over, and Artois petering out. And again not much happened until spring...

The Russians captured Galicia from Austria-Hungary and occupied it, but the fighting stalled in the Carpathians over the winter.

Said success caused the Germans to put a little more into the East than they'd planned (since their entire strategy was based on taking care of France first). But the Prussian campaign was Russia's to lose and did they ever. A cock-up for the ages, with a huge portion of the pre-war trained army annihilated at Tannenberg and Masuria. But the Germans were still much more busy out West and didn't pursue very far into Poland.

The first Canadian forces were mobilized immediately and trickled into the UK over the remainder of 1914. What became the First Canadian Division (including men from my hometown, my parents' hometowns, and my current home) was officially constituted on January 26 1915 and left for France in February.

Wait, are you saying that WW1 was Canada's first war?
What about the Bore War? New Zealand troops fought in the Bore War, surely Canadian troops did also.

Boer Wars

I've had grandparents, great grandparents, great uncles fight and die in both World Wars and feel a strange animosity to the Germans. Given most Germans I've met have been nice, apart from their extensive tracksuit collections I don't have anything bad to say.

Anyway, my point?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25156510
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: