A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
19-02-2013, 11:56 PM
Video A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
Dr. Gregory Sadler of Marist College recently discussed Ayn Rand's The Virtue of Selfishness in his Spring 2013 Ethics class and posted the video to YouTube:





I remember that my professor in Philosophy 101 discussed Ayn Rand and that the textbook had an excerpt from the introduction to The Virtue of Selfishness. But I don't think that my professor was as good at explaining Rand as Dr. Sadler is.

I do have a couple of critiques of his presentation, though:

Regarding 51:27, Rand considers virtues eminently practical. A breach of integrity has very real, self-destructive consequences in the long-term. There is no gap between morally principled action and practical action. (Practical for achieving long-term flourishing.)
Also, contrary to 52:48, Rand wouldn't say the choice of friends is arbitrary, but ought to depend on their objective virtues/values. Vicious people harm one's own life when you're involved with them; virtuous people typically benefit one's own life.
---
Did anyone else have philosophy professors who discussed Rand?

Blog: Objectivism for Intellectuals

My Introduction to Objectivism Playlist on YouTube Thumbsup

The Is/Ought Gap has been bridged: Read Viable Values by Dr. Tara Smith.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
20-02-2013, 12:50 AM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
I've never had a philosophy professor, in the traditional sense of the word so, no. I have, however, read and heard a lot of philosophers talking about Ayn Rand. She contributed a lot to philosophy but she ran afoul with the intellectual community when she applied logic to the state. That's a no no in academia.


On another note... can you summarize the solution to the is/ought dichotomy, mentioned in your signature?
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
20-02-2013, 06:00 AM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
I've never had a professor


Of any description.


Weeping

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
20-02-2013, 07:02 AM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
(20-02-2013 06:00 AM)DLJ Wrote:  I've never had a professor
Of any description.
Weeping
I have a class this semester from Professor RATigan. Really, I do. Weeping

[Image: DVD_Ratigan.jpg]

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating Yogi, CAAT-LY.
Assistant Manager, Vice Detection, Whoville : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
20-02-2013, 07:19 AM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
So, I've just watched the lecture.

Thanks for posting it SoA.

The dude needs to go on a Presentation Skills course! Bland delivery Sad

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
21-02-2013, 11:57 AM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
(20-02-2013 12:50 AM)bbeljefe Wrote:  I've never had a philosophy professor, in the traditional sense of the word so, no. I have, however, read and heard a lot of philosophers talking about Ayn Rand. She contributed a lot to philosophy but she ran afoul with the intellectual community when she applied logic to the state. That's a no no in academia.


On another note... can you summarize the solution to the is/ought dichotomy, mentioned in your signature?
You're right, that is a no no in academia.

As David Hume noted, deductive reasoning is incapable of generating an "ought" conclusion from purely "is" premises. However, induction from observation is capable of doing this. (Inductive reasoning is the rational method of reaching any general truth.) All living creatures act to sustain their lives in the face of the life/death alternative that they face. These actions are directed toward goals that serve the fundamental goal of maintaining their lives. These goals are values. So the flourishing of life is the ultimate basis of all values, including moral values.

So, the fact that man is a living creature determines what he ought to do. Man, unlike other living creatures, is free to reject his own life as the goal of his actions. But he is not free to escape the fact that he is a living creature and the consequences of that fact. If a man rejects his own life as the goal of his actions, then he is engaged in the process of self-destruction.

If you want some more discussion of values and the choice of an ultimate value, (outside of buying Tara Smith's book) I recommend this post that I wrote: Values Are Relational But Not Subjective.

Blog: Objectivism for Intellectuals

My Introduction to Objectivism Playlist on YouTube Thumbsup

The Is/Ought Gap has been bridged: Read Viable Values by Dr. Tara Smith.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
21-02-2013, 12:25 PM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
Thanks a lot. I agree with that conclusion and I enjoyed reading your post on values. You might be interested in the book, "Universally Preferable Behavior, A Rational Proof of Secular Ethics", by Stefan Molyneux. The book is free and is available in audio as well as several text formats.

He was heavily influenced by Rand and his answer to the is ought dichotomy is spot on with the one you presented. UPB is a methodology for testing moral claims and it's foundations are similar to the principles you outlined.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
21-02-2013, 12:32 PM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
(19-02-2013 11:56 PM)Sword of Apollo Wrote:  Did anyone else have philosophy professors who discussed Rand?

No. However, I used to drink with a philosophy professor and our discussions of Rand went like this:

Me: What an elitist cunt.
Him: Yea, she was kind of a whiny whore.

The end.

Kind of a long time ago so, not sure if either of us have changed our respective views of her work. Probably not. Drinking Beverage

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like kim's post
21-02-2013, 03:13 PM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
During my short stint in school, my philosophy professor said something about actually wanting to teach real philosophy.

If you couldn't guess, we didn't cover Rand; Egoism was covered, however.

The Paradox Of Fools And Wise Men:
“The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser men so full of doubts.” ― Bertrand Russell
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
21-02-2013, 09:59 PM
RE: A Philosophy Professor Discusses Ayn Rand in his Ethics Class
(21-02-2013 03:13 PM)TrulyX Wrote:  During my short stint in school, my philosophy professor said something about actually wanting to teach real philosophy.

If you couldn't guess, we didn't cover Rand; Egoism was covered, however.

What are your criteria of what constitutes "real philosophy" and what makes you think Rand doesn't fit in that category?

Blog: Objectivism for Intellectuals

My Introduction to Objectivism Playlist on YouTube Thumbsup

The Is/Ought Gap has been bridged: Read Viable Values by Dr. Tara Smith.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: