A bite of the Sichuan Cuisine Episode 1
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30-03-2013, 10:38 AM
A bite of Sichuan Cuisine
So, when eating chicken feet, is it customary to eat the bones or to spit them out? I don't like eating bones either. It's one of the reasons I have trouble eating sardines.

When I visited Shanghai I asked my coworker there to take me to his favorite place to eat at lunch. He took me to the local Sichuan restaurant. That was some delicious food. My coworker was surprised to see an American enjoying spicy food. I admit I am atypical for the US in some ways.

One of the dishes we ate looks like the first photo posted but had fish. I extracted a fillet from the dish (very soupy and red) and ate it. Apparently inside the fold of the fillet I took was hidden some form of peppercorn (best guess). That was the single most spicy thing I think I've ever eaten. To describe the sensation requires having had the experience of putting one's tongue to the two contacts of a 9V battery (when I was a kid! On a dare, of course!). My tongue had no idea what was happening! Felt like electric shock.

So, Junyuan, some of the dishes above have plenty of red chilies in them. Do you eat those too? Just curious. I always avoid them because of their texture.

Also, thanks for this thread. It's delicious!
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30-03-2013, 10:47 AM
RE: A bite of Sichuan Cuisine
(30-03-2013 10:38 AM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  One of the dishes we ate looks like the first photo posted but had fish. I extracted a fillet from the dish (very soupy and red) and ate it. Apparently inside the fold of the fillet I took was hidden some form of peppercorn (best guess). That was the single most spicy thing I think I've ever eaten. To describe the sensation requires having had the experience of putting one's tongue to the two contacts of a 9V battery (when I was a kid! On a dare, of course!). My tongue had no idea what was happening! Felt like electric shock.

So, Junyuan, some of the dishes above have plenty of red chilies in them. Do you eat those too? Just curious. I always avoid them because of their texture.

Maybe the culprit isn't the peppercorn but the mountain pepper.

[Image: 67585_Cx62H.jpg]

I don't eat the seasoning red chilies. But when I chewed up one mountain pepper once, I felt the same thing. Electric shock is a pretty precise description.

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30-03-2013, 10:51 AM
A bite of Sichuan Cuisine
(30-03-2013 10:47 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  
(30-03-2013 10:38 AM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  One of the dishes we ate looks like the first photo posted but had fish. I extracted a fillet from the dish (very soupy and red) and ate it. Apparently inside the fold of the fillet I took was hidden some form of peppercorn (best guess). That was the single most spicy thing I think I've ever eaten. To describe the sensation requires having had the experience of putting one's tongue to the two contacts of a 9V battery (when I was a kid! On a dare, of course!). My tongue had no idea what was happening! Felt like electric shock.

So, Junyuan, some of the dishes above have plenty of red chilies in them. Do you eat those too? Just curious. I always avoid them because of their texture.

Maybe the culprit isn't the peppercorn but the mountain pepper.

[Image: 67585_Cx62H.jpg]

I don't eat the seasoning red chilies. But when I chewed up one mountain pepper once, I felt the same thing. Electric shock is a pretty precise description.

Interesting. But what I ate was much smaller and round and hard like a peppercorn. Perhaps it was a seed from one of these. In any case it was the most interesting culinary experience I'd ever had.
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30-03-2013, 10:59 AM
RE: A bite of Sichuan Cuisine
(30-03-2013 10:29 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  
(30-03-2013 10:25 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  Bay leaf cashew chicken fry´╝č

[Image: 1_100522090658_1.jpg]

Could very well be. Looks similar.

Mmmmm. One of my favourites too. Beef and chicken combo. Drooling

I had it at least once a week when I lived in Sydney. One of those places that's irritatingly named Thai-riffic or Thai-tanic or some such.

My first week in Singapore I was it on a menu and had to try it. One mouthful and I was imploring the waitress for water, tears rolling down my face. She thought I was having a heart attack, I think.

I few weeks later, I tried it in Bangkok. It made the Singa dish seem mild.

Lesson learned.

I'm obviously just a suk (as they say in Oz)... not in the Cardinal's league.
Weeping

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30-03-2013, 11:08 AM
RE: A bite of Sichuan Cuisine
(30-03-2013 10:51 AM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  
(30-03-2013 10:47 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  Maybe the culprit isn't the peppercorn but the mountain pepper.

[Image: 67585_Cx62H.jpg]

I don't eat the seasoning red chilies. But when I chewed up one mountain pepper once, I felt the same thing. Electric shock is a pretty precise description.

Interesting. But what I ate was much smaller and round and hard like a peppercorn. Perhaps it was a seed from one of these. In any case it was the most interesting culinary experience I'd ever had.

Since it was small and round, I guess it was green prickleyash, which provide a numbing experience exactly as you described.

Numbing and spicy are the two quintessences of Sichuan cuisine realized by different types of spices and peppers.

[Image: u=1061670657,3197652315&fm=21&gp=0.jpg]

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30-03-2013, 11:17 AM
RE: A bite of Sichuan Cuisine
Spicy is great. Chicken Vindaloo (yes I know its an indian dish) is one of my favourite dishes due to that Smile

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30-03-2013, 01:22 PM
A bite of the Sichuan Cuisine Episode 1
(30-03-2013 11:17 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  Spicy is great. Chicken Vindaloo (yes I know its an indian dish) is one of my favourite dishes due to that :)

Ok, now you guys are making me hungry. And I just ate!

Wife just made me some Huevos con Chorizo para el desayuno. I'm spoiled.
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30-03-2013, 01:26 PM
A bite of the Sichuan Cuisine Episode 1
(30-03-2013 11:08 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  
(30-03-2013 10:51 AM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  Interesting. But what I ate was much smaller and round and hard like a peppercorn. Perhaps it was a seed from one of these. In any case it was the most interesting culinary experience I'd ever had.

Since it was small and round, I guess it was green prickleyash, which provide a numbing experience exactly as you described.

Numbing and spicy are the two quintessences of Sichuan cuisine realized by different types of spices and peppers.

[Image: u=1061670657,3197652315&fm=21&gp=0.jpg]

By Jove, this must be it! Thank you!

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sichuan_pepper#section_2
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30-03-2013, 01:32 PM
RE: A bite of the Sichuan Cuisine Episode 1
(30-03-2013 01:22 PM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  
(30-03-2013 11:17 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  Spicy is great. Chicken Vindaloo (yes I know its an indian dish) is one of my favourite dishes due to that Smile

Ok, now you guys are making me hungry. And I just ate!

Wife just made me some Huevos con Chorizo para el desayuno. I'm spoiled.

Love eggs and sausages.Smile

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