A question about medical appointment in the West.
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
08-03-2014, 05:28 AM
A question about medical appointment in the West.
I know the word "appointment" is used in Western healthcare, but am not clear about its frequency.

If I have an acute tooth pain now, I will go to a hospital nearby, get registrated, wait for some ten minitues (usually less than 1 hour) and then a doctor will give me a diagnose and a nurse will treat me accordingly.

So, I understand what an appointment means but have rarely had it.

What is it like ?

Want something? Then do something.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-03-2014, 05:31 AM
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
(08-03-2014 05:28 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  I know the word "appointment" is used in Western healthcare, but am not clear about its frequency.

If I have an acute tooth pain now, I will go to a hospital nearby, get registrated, wait for some ten minitues (usually less than 1 hour) and then a doctor will give me a diagnose and a nurse will treat me accordingly.

So, I understand what an appointment means but have rarely had it.

What is it like ?

Generally speaking an appointment is for routine check-ups and yearly physicals. Things that are not in need of immediate care and can be scheduled well in advance.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Revenant77x's post
08-03-2014, 07:12 AM
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
(08-03-2014 05:31 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  Generally speaking an appointment is for routine check-ups and yearly physicals. Things that are not in need of immediate care and can be scheduled well in advance.

I got a stereotype notion about medical appointment like the following:

"I need to see the doctor. I have a toothache."

"Do you have an appointment, sir ?"

"No ... but really need to see the doctor now. It's killing me ! "

"Sorry sir, but you need to get an appointment first. The nearest available time is ... three weeks later."

"What the ... ! "

"I am sorry sir. But that's the best we can do right now."

------

That's formed from the movies I watched, I guess.

It probably applies for private clinics / doctors but not for public institutions or big hospitals, right ?

Want something? Then do something.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-03-2014, 07:20 AM
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
(08-03-2014 07:12 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  
(08-03-2014 05:31 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  Generally speaking an appointment is for routine check-ups and yearly physicals. Things that are not in need of immediate care and can be scheduled well in advance.

I got a stereotype notion about medical appointment like the following:

"I need to see the doctor. I have a toothache."

"Do you have an appointment, sir ?"

"No ... but really need to see the doctor now. It's killing me ! "

"Sorry sir, but you need to get an appointment first. The nearest available time is ... three weeks later."

"What the ... ! "

"I am sorry sir. But that's the best we can do right now."

Well I guess that's accurate if you looking at a private clinic or a doctor's surgery, but here in Australia, you don't need appointments at hospitals, you just turn up and go through the triage process and wait for the doc to see to you.

Plus a lot of private clinics and public surgeries tend to have walk-in policies on certain days. Though try to do a walk-in at a dentists office or optometrist, you'll probably be turned right back round and told to schedule an appointment. For some reason which is beyond me, dentistry and optometry aren't really included as anything outside private medicine...

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
"Anti-environmentalism is like standing in front of a forest and going 'quick kill them they're coming right for us!'" - Jake Farr-Wharton, The Imaginary Friend Show.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Free Thought's post
08-03-2014, 07:43 AM
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
Mine is also an Australian perspective. Usually the following applies:
* A General Practitioner (GP) is your local doctor. If you are unwell you call to make an appointment. If you call in the morning you can usually arrange an appointment on that day, but it depends on the GP clinic. Some areas have shortages of GPs and appointments can take longer. If you have something non-urgent to do such as a general health checkup or to check in for a recurring health issue you'll usually make an appointment at least a few days in advance: "I can't come in to work today because I have a doctor's appointment"
* If you arrive at a hospital emergency room you do not need an appointment. They will treat the sickest patients first, and if you are that person you'll get good service. If you are just unwell you might wait a few hours before you are seen.
-- However there is some crossover between GPs and hospital emergency rooms. GPs will generally have a sign up saying that if you have any kind of medical emergency you must tell them immediately and they will see you right away or organise an ambulance to take you to emergency. In the other direction, hospital emergency rooms often serve as GPs for people who need a doctor over the weekend or otherwise don't have a regular GP who can serve them quickly.

After GPs and emergency rooms come "specialists". A specialist is someone who is trained in a particular area of the body such as "ear, nose and throat", "gynaecology", etc. Specialists generally only operate by appointment and you can't see one in Australia without a written referral from a GP. Specialists will be called in to help out with the emergency room if their speciality is relevant - in fact one speciality is "emergency".

As Free Thought says, optical and dental are separate to the main health system. Generally you'll make an appointment but both will see you quickly if you have an emergency of some kind. These are private businesses and the rules will vary depending on where you go.

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Hafnof's post
08-03-2014, 08:37 AM (This post was last modified: 08-03-2014 08:45 AM by HU.Junyuan.)
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
There are private optical and dental clinics in China too (mostly dental). A lot of such illness case, at least to my experience, are treated in public hospitals.

Diagnoses on most illnesses are generally by a walk-in policy. Procedures involving CT, B ultrasonic, color Doppler ultrasound and etc. may take a while but normally within the same day. Operations are definitely scheduled, or in other terms, according to the appointments (now I understand it better).

We don't have GPs in general public hospitals. Doctors are mostly specialists, take turns to appear in the office if there are quite a few of them in the same clinical department, and normally don't require an appointment. But there is always an experienced nurse at the registration desk who helps the patients identify a suitable specialist.

So we rarely say "I can't come in to work today because I have a doctor's appointment" to boss. Instead, we say "I can't come in to work today. I feel sick. I am going to see a doctor."

Thanks for your explanations, Revenant77x, Free Thought and Hafnof.

Edit: I think my uncle probably is a GP. He works at an airport's clinic and treats people if they suddently get sick there.

Want something? Then do something.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-03-2014, 08:48 AM
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
(08-03-2014 07:12 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  
(08-03-2014 05:31 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  Generally speaking an appointment is for routine check-ups and yearly physicals. Things that are not in need of immediate care and can be scheduled well in advance.

I got a stereotype notion about medical appointment like the following:

"I need to see the doctor. I have a toothache."

"Do you have an appointment, sir ?"

"No ... but really need to see the doctor now. It's killing me ! "

"Sorry sir, but you need to get an appointment first. The nearest available time is ... three weeks later."

"What the ... ! "

"I am sorry sir. But that's the best we can do right now."

------

That's formed from the movies I watched, I guess.

It probably applies for private clinics / doctors but not for public institutions or big hospitals, right ?

Are we talking Canada or the US? I thought people in the US didn't have to wait for weeks. I was under the impression that in the US folks just walk on in and get to see a doctor within minutes. At least that's one of the arguments I've heard from guys that claim the American system is superior. That, and they toss around the most fears word in America... Socialism!
But anyway...
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Drunkin Druid's post
08-03-2014, 08:51 AM
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
Dental work is not covered in Canada by the universal healthcare system. Dental offices are privately run but if I go to my dentist with an emergency I get in right away. But that could just be my dentist. I dunno..
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Drunkin Druid's post
08-03-2014, 08:57 AM
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
(08-03-2014 07:12 AM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  
(08-03-2014 05:31 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  Generally speaking an appointment is for routine check-ups and yearly physicals. Things that are not in need of immediate care and can be scheduled well in advance.

I got a stereotype notion about medical appointment like the following:

"I need to see the doctor. I have a toothache."

"Do you have an appointment, sir ?"

"No ... but really need to see the doctor now. It's killing me ! "

"Sorry sir, but you need to get an appointment first. The nearest available time is ... three weeks later."

"What the ... ! "

"I am sorry sir. But that's the best we can do right now."

------

That's formed from the movies I watched, I guess.

It probably applies for private clinics / doctors but not for public institutions or big hospitals, right ?

In America, I want to say in theory because the way things are SUPPOSED to work and the way they ACTUALLY work are two different things..

So in theory- hospitals are for seriously ill, need round the clock medical care, walk ins are supposed to be true emergencies, broken limbs, stitches, trauma, treat me now or it's going to get ugly fast situations.

Other illnesses, non emergency, in theory, you are supposed to call your primary care doctor, the one that knows your history, that you see for preventative care. A good office will keep part of their daily appointments for walk in / sick patients that they are already seeing. In real life, they are overbooked and you can't get in. Only pediatrics office is where I have been able to get a same day appointment.

With no sick appointments available, but people need same day treatment we end up at the emergency room of the hospital, and pay $ out the ass. Most communities are getting what we call urgent care offices. Where you can get minor illnesses and injuries treated in a walk in setting. They are also nicknamed "Doc in a Box" because they are usually located in shopping centers or near neighborhoods. Their hours are normally 7am-9pm. So if you need something outside that time, you are going to the hospital with a non life threatening injury that will have you in the waiting room for 4 hours waiting to be seen.


"Life is a daring adventure or it is nothing"--Helen Keller
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Bows and Arrows's post
08-03-2014, 09:01 AM
RE: A question about medical appointment in the West.
For regular dental care I know that I have to make an appointment. I have one Tuesday afternoon that I made six months ago at my last cleaning and exam. However, I have been going to the same dentist for about seven years now. When I have had a couple severe dental issues I was able to call (even the after hours number) and have been able to be seen on the same day.

I can almost always get a same day appointment with my regular doctor. Both my dentist and doctor set aside time each day for urgent cases.

Not all medical practices are like that though.

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Anjele's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: