A world without war
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13-11-2017, 11:49 AM
RE: A world without war
(13-11-2017 11:20 AM)BikerDude Wrote:  
(13-11-2017 11:04 AM)ImFred Wrote:  That interview is fantastic!

Huxley is frightening.
Because he shows that progression toward totalitarianism is so subtle and inevitable.
And when you listen to him it sounds like he predicted things.
Like his thing about drugs. Today any kid that acts up gets labeled as "having a disease" and gets put on drugs to make him conform.
And I can't help but hear echos of my favorite "modern" philosopher the Unabomber.
LOL. Yeah I said that. And I'll stick with it.

As best I understand, the Unabomber’s argument goes like this:

  1. Personal freedoms are constrained by society, as they must be.
  2. The stronger that technology makes society, the less freedoms.
  3. Technology destroys nature, which strengthens technology further.
  4. This ratchet of technological self-amplification is stronger than politics.
  5. Any attempt to use technology or politics to tame the system only strengthens it.
  6. Therefore technological civilization must be destroyed, rather than reformed.
  7. Since it cannot be destroyed by tech or politics, humans must push industrial society towards its inevitable end of self-collapse.
  8. Then pounce on it when it is down and kill it before it rises again





And Huxley has the honor of having The Doors take their name from his book "The Doors Of Perception" about his use of mescaline. Which was all the rage.
Sartre wrote Nausea after a mescaline trip. Intellectually were all tripping balls back in the 30's. It was all the rage. Think Height Ashbury for your great grand dad.

I thought about the Unabomber Manifesto while I was watching that.

Have you ever read about Huxley’s death?
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13-11-2017, 11:52 AM
RE: A world without war
(13-11-2017 11:20 AM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  The vast majority of humans who have ever lived might as well have not lived.

Wrong. Everything on this planet has made it what it is. Even the still born baby, who affected it's parents, who in turn affected their other children and their children and so on. Even the childless ones affect everyone and everything around them.

What you ate today has affected the fauna and flora of this planet. The grass you stepped on affected the millions of organisms living in the soil beneath it. It's all interwoven and over time each single thing each single person does affects the world forever because it all sets chain reactions in motion.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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13-11-2017, 12:10 PM
RE: A world without war
(13-11-2017 11:49 AM)ImFred Wrote:  I thought about the Unabomber Manifesto while I was watching that.

Have you ever read about Huxley’s death?

Reading this I just googled it.
Tripped to death.
I didn't think that was possible.


Quote:On his deathbed, unable to speak due to advanced laryngeal cancer, Huxley made a written request to his wife Laura for "LSD, 100 µg, intramuscular". According to her account of his death[54] in This Timeless Moment, she obliged with an injection at 11:20 a.m. and a second dose an hour later; Huxley died aged 69, at 5:20 p.m. (Los Angeles time), on 22 November 1963.[55]

Media coverage of Huxley's death — as with that of the author C. S. Lewis – was overshadowed by the assassination of US President John F. Kennedy on the same day.[56] This coincidence served as the basis for Peter Kreeft's book Between Heaven and Hell: A Dialog Somewhere Beyond Death with John F. Kennedy, C. S. Lewis, & Aldous Huxley, which imagines a conversation among the three men taking place in Purgatory following their deaths.[57]

Huxley's memorial service took place in London in December 1963 which was led by his older brother Julian, and on 27 October 1971[58] his ashes were interred in the family grave at the Watts Cemetery, home of the Watts Mortuary Chapel in Compton, Guildford, Surrey, England.[59]

Huxley had been a long-time friend of Russian composer Igor Stravinsky, who later dedicated his last orchestral composition to Huxley. Stravinsky began Variations in Santa Fé, New Mexico, in July 1963, and completed the composition in Hollywood on 28 October 1964. It was first performed in Chicago on 17 April 1965, by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Robert Craft.[60][61]

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13-11-2017, 12:11 PM (This post was last modified: 13-11-2017 12:18 PM by BikerDude.)
RE: A world without war
(13-11-2017 11:52 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(13-11-2017 11:20 AM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  The vast majority of humans who have ever lived might as well have not lived.

Wrong. Everything on this planet has made it what it is. Even the still born baby, who affected it's parents, who in turn affected their other children and their children and so on. Even the childless ones affect everyone and everything around them.

What you ate today has affected the fauna and flora of this planet. The grass you stepped on affected the millions of organisms living in the soil beneath it. It's all interwoven and over time each single thing each single person does affects the world forever because it all sets chain reactions in motion.

They mattered to their people.
That's all that matters.

We have hijacked the hell out of this thread.
I'm out.

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13-11-2017, 09:52 PM
RE: A world without war
Last summer I stood on cemetery ridge and thought about walking calmly across that field, facing not to accurate but lethal weapons. I would ask all would you like to do that.
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13-11-2017, 10:23 PM
RE: A world without war
(13-11-2017 09:52 PM)JAH Wrote:  Last summer I stood on cemetery ridge and thought about walking calmly across that field, facing not to accurate but lethal weapons. I would ask all would you like to do that.

I don’t know that reference if it is one. If not, I’m not really sure what it means. Is it to face violence with pacifism?
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