AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
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05-03-2017, 11:54 AM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
(05-03-2017 11:19 AM)Anjele Wrote:  Thump and Rear View beat me to it. Any doctor who has any knowledge regarding addiction is going to know that falling off the wagon (and lying about it) is part of the deal.

To get help you have to first be honest with yourself and then be honest with those you go to for help/care. I firmly believe the first is much harder than the second.

Falling off the wagon doesn't mean you can't get back on. Thumbsup

Thanks anjele, but even if I succeed my life span is limited due to my previous behaviour. That's ok though, I'm at peace with that.
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05-03-2017, 11:57 AM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
That's right. The recovery forum where I read and post, when someone falls off, I'll tell 'em, "Get back on the horse and ride some more." Keep moving towards the goal, and forgive yourself imperfection is execution. Beating yourself up over slips can turn them from slips to full-blown relapse.
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05-03-2017, 12:05 PM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
(05-03-2017 11:54 AM)adey67 Wrote:  
(05-03-2017 11:19 AM)Anjele Wrote:  Thump and Rear View beat me to it. Any doctor who has any knowledge regarding addiction is going to know that falling off the wagon (and lying about it) is part of the deal.

To get help you have to first be honest with yourself and then be honest with those you go to for help/care. I firmly believe the first is much harder than the second.

Falling off the wagon doesn't mean you can't get back on. Thumbsup

Thanks anjele, but even if I succeed my life span is limited due to my previous behaviour. That's ok though, I'm at peace with that.

You ain't goin' anywhere. I will be 60 this summer and lord (or someone) knows how I made it this far...holy crap the self-destructive things I did. No Even those closest to me don't know how far I went along a highway to hell of my own making.

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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05-03-2017, 12:29 PM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
(05-03-2017 12:05 PM)Anjele Wrote:  You ain't goin' anywhere. I will be 60 this summer and lord (or someone) knows how I made it this far...holy crap the self-destructive things I did. No Even those closest to me don't know how far I went along a highway to hell of my own making.

Yep right there with ya

I get to decide what my life looks like, not the other way around.
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05-03-2017, 12:47 PM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
(27-02-2017 08:16 AM)RearViewMirror Wrote:  I've been sober for about the same amount of time as you. I went to AA for a while and while I certainly take nothing away from the program, it just wasn't for me. It's a wonderful program and If you can get past the first step I highly recommend it. I could get to the first step and admit I was an alcoholic but releasing it to a higher power was just not in the cards for me. I was much like you and had to hit my "rock bottom" before I could get my feet back under me and stand back up. I wish you continued success my friend.

Is there some "rule" that says this "higher power" thing has to be anything other than the commitment(sobriety)? Or maybe the self?

I have always wondered about this whole higher power thing. To me, it would be a guarantee of getting the rug pulled out from under one again and again.

**
Hypothetically:
If I have no boundaries concerning what is set in front of me... guess what? ... I am addicted to what is set in front of me. I am the one with no boundaries - not some "higher power". Shouldn't I be making this commitment to my self?

If nothing else, wouldn't the continual challenge and exercise of self worth, strengthen the commitment as well as my self? Each time I'm challenged by what is set in front of me, I could rely on my self and/or the commitment to my self to help me avoid what is set in front of me. Each time this happens, I could put a notch on my self esteem belt - I could pat me on the back for a change.

Why can't I do ^^that^^ -- instead of continually telling myself that something else is in control of shitty me and shitty life ... which makes me want ... what is set in front of me?
**

I guess I just don't get how this whole "higher power" thing is supposed to work. Consider

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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05-03-2017, 01:10 PM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
Yeah, when they told me that my HP "could be that doorknob", that's when I figured it was an inherently meaningless concept for me.
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05-03-2017, 01:25 PM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
(05-03-2017 12:47 PM)kim Wrote:  
(27-02-2017 08:16 AM)RearViewMirror Wrote:  I've been sober for about the same amount of time as you. I went to AA for a while and while I certainly take nothing away from the program, it just wasn't for me. It's a wonderful program and If you can get past the first step I highly recommend it. I could get to the first step and admit I was an alcoholic but releasing it to a higher power was just not in the cards for me. I was much like you and had to hit my "rock bottom" before I could get my feet back under me and stand back up. I wish you continued success my friend.

Is there some "rule" that says this "higher power" thing has to be anything other than the commitment(sobriety)? Or maybe the self?

I have always wondered about this whole higher power thing. To me, it would be a guarantee of getting the rug pulled out from under one again and again.

**
Hypothetically:
If I have no boundaries concerning what is set in front of me... guess what? ... I am addicted to what is set in front of me. I am the one with no boundaries - not some "higher power". Shouldn't I be making this commitment to my self?

If nothing else, wouldn't the continual challenge and exercise of self worth, strengthen the commitment as well as my self? Each time I'm challenged by what is set in front of me, I could rely on my self and/or the commitment to my self to help me avoid what is set in front of me. Each time this happens, I could put a notch on my self esteem belt - I could pat me on the back for a change.

Why can't I do ^^that^^ -- instead of continually telling myself that something else is in control of shitty me and shitty life ... which makes me want ... what is set in front of me?
**

I guess I just don't get how this whole "higher power" thing is supposed to work. Consider

Much like Thump alluded to. You could release it to a higher power greater than yourself how you personally see God (or doorknobs).

AA Rules 2 & 3

2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to
sanity.

3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we
understood Him

Those are the steps that I couldn't make a commitment to so I made it a personal mission to do this for myself and my family. And with that commitment I was able to accomplish this goal with my family's help and a personal willingness to admit that I had a problem and that I needed to be held accountable for my actions. Again, I don't discredit AA by any stretch of the imagination but it just wasn't "for me". It is a wonderful program that helps many people and for that I'm grateful that it is a service that is available. It just wasn't for me.

I get to decide what my life looks like, not the other way around.
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05-03-2017, 02:08 PM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
Higher power, God, spirituality, prayer - it's big part of AA

Sometimes I comment on how stupid it is but usually I ignore it and keep myself directly focused on sobriety.

It's sort of like this:

I like (American) football but I don't like flag waving and truck commercials. I still watch the games.

The game is to football what sobriety is to AA.

I don't need a higher power any more than I need truck commercials.

At this point I've come to believe that AA helps me stay off booze. So I'm still going to meetings. Me not drinking. That's my deal.
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05-03-2017, 02:13 PM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
(05-03-2017 02:08 PM)ImFred Wrote:  Higher power, God, spirituality, prayer - it's big part of AA

Sometimes I comment on how stupid it is but usually I ignore it and keep myself directly focused on sobriety.

It's sort of like this:

I like (American) football but I don't like flag waving and truck commercials. I still watch the games.

The game is to football what sobriety is to AA.

I don't need a higher power any more than I need truck commercials.

At this point I've come to believe that AA helps me stay off booze. So I'm still going to meetings. Me not drinking. That's my deal.

Exactly the reason that I am happy that there is a program out there like AA. It truly is a great program and helps millions of people everyday.

I get to decide what my life looks like, not the other way around.
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05-03-2017, 02:25 PM
RE: AA - Atheists and Alcoholism
It's a positive tool. My dad complained about it, but I think it did help him too.
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