About to meet DLJ
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
16-10-2015, 03:51 PM
RE: About to meet DLJ
We laughed and ate and drank and had a great time. Pics to follow, on way to airplane.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 5 users Like Full Circle's post
16-10-2015, 04:21 PM
RE: About to meet DLJ
(16-10-2015 03:51 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  We laughed and ate and drank and had a great time. Pics to follow, on way to airplane.

This whole alleged meeting remains firmly in the fiction section until photographic evidence is supplied to the forum. Drinking Beverage

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Chas's post
16-10-2015, 04:30 PM
RE: About to meet DLJ
How come I have this unnerving feeling that two of the Illuminati have just met to decide all our fates?
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Mathilda's post
16-10-2015, 04:33 PM
RE: About to meet DLJ
(16-10-2015 04:30 PM)Mathilda Wrote:  How come I have this unnerving feeling that two of the Illuminati have just met to decide all our fates?

As long as they don't meet with earmuffs and psikeyhack they don't have a quorum.

#sigh
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
16-10-2015, 09:41 PM
RE: About to meet DLJ
(16-10-2015 04:21 PM)Chas Wrote:  ...
This whole alleged meeting remains firmly in the fiction section until photographic evidence is supplied to the forum. Drinking Beverage

If you insist...

Warning: Image cropped to comply with TTA rules, but still may cause psychological damage to those hoping to see a Nurse, undergroundp or a GWoG.
[Image: 9rkrxh.jpg]

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 11 users Like DLJ's post
16-10-2015, 10:15 PM
RE: About to meet DLJ
(16-10-2015 09:41 PM)DLJ Wrote:  
(16-10-2015 04:21 PM)Chas Wrote:  ...
This whole alleged meeting remains firmly in the fiction section until photographic evidence is supplied to the forum. Drinking Beverage

If you insist...

Warning: Image cropped to comply with TTA rules, but still may cause psychological damage to those hoping to see a Nurse, undergroundp or a GWoG.
[Image: 9rkrxh.jpg]

Seems like some sort of regular guy. I am disappoint. I was looking for some smoke.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
17-10-2015, 01:08 AM
RE: About to meet DLJ
The Big Picture.

My evening with DLJ was going great, we acquainted ourselves over a fine Chinese dinner and toasted with a bottle of hot Sake. When we were done I brought out my computer and played a slide show of my favorite underwater images taken during our recent trip to Lembeh Strait in Northern Sulawesi and the area known as Raja Ampat (The Five Kings) off of West Papua, New Guinea, Indonesia.

DLJ gave them his undivided attention and when the slide show was finished he paid me a much appreciated compliment telling me that the photos had moved him but then he asked the probing question that has led me to this writing and that is; to what end? Besides the inherent beauty of the images of fish and coral reefs was there a further usefulness to capturing images of the underwater world?

I found myself struggling to defend my passion. I began stammering in an effort to give my work a greater meaning. I mentioned that we (my wife and I) were the largest contributors of fish identification images to the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute outside of the authors, that some of our findings were expanding the known range of species, that marine biologist regularly contacted us for the use of our images to publish in their papers, that we were going to be co-authors of an upcoming scientific paper that documented changes in species biogeography over a fifty year span and that we also sold our photos to be published in magazines, books and even to a museum. I also told him how we, as volunteers of a non-profit organization, give presentations twice a month to post-graduate interns and the public at large on fish behavior and identification. After regurgitating all of this I was still left with the empty feeling that perhaps this wasn’t enough to warrant all the time, effort and expense I devote to my obsession.

I found myself wrestling with my inner demons…fish pictures…big deal.

We left the Chinese restaurant and headed one floor up to a bar and continued to thoroughly enjoy ourselves telling stories of our life, family, travels and exotic foods we’ve eaten like horse meat stew in Mongolia and Guinea pig thermidor in Peru. Of course we also discussed the TTA forum and its cast of characters while DLJ imbibed Kahlua and Coke and I had multiple rounds of Glenmorangie single malt scotch that helped loosen our tongues to the point of sharing our middle names heretofore sworn to secrecy. Don’t even ask.

The night ended too soon, I was tired from a long day of travel and my flight would be early in the morning so we said our goodbyes and I left sincerely hoping that we would meet again in the future. DLJ, besides leaving me with the sense of having made a real connection, also left me with the nagging thought…fish pictures…big deal.

This morning as I walked the terminal in the Singapore airport I stopped at a bookstore to browse the pitifully small Science section. I bought a book entitled Ten Million Aliens about the weird life forms found on planet Earth and then I browsed through the latest issue of National Geographic and as I did this the answer to his query hit me.

I know why I do what I do, and that is for the sheer pleasure of gathering knowledge, personal knowledge mostly and sometimes if I’m lucky, adding to the greater body of science at large. Will any of this extrapolate to the betterment of the human condition? Probably not. But I am hopeful that if our images spur even one future marine biologist, one more person to care for our planet and its denizens, above or below the ocean surface, then maybe a pretty fish picture is more than what meets the eye and I can live with that.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 11 users Like Full Circle's post
17-10-2015, 01:14 AM
RE: About to meet DLJ
(16-10-2015 10:22 AM)Lightvader Wrote:  FC is a dude? -_-

Let me look again...yup. Big Grin

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Full Circle's post
17-10-2015, 01:31 AM
RE: About to meet DLJ
(17-10-2015 01:08 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  I know why I do what I do, and that is for the sheer pleasure of gathering knowledge, personal knowledge mostly and sometimes if I’m lucky, adding to the greater body of science at large.

That's why people become scientists. And human society benefits from this. The fact that you can sell your pictures, or are asked to allow them to be published or give talks about them means that there is a demand for them and they are useful in some way. You just don't necessarily know all the ways in which they are useful.

I'm a scientist and no one ever references my papers or gives me funding to do my research. But I continue to do it in my spare time despite this because I am passionate about it and I want to know the answers.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Mathilda's post
17-10-2015, 04:27 AM (This post was last modified: 17-10-2015 07:03 AM by DLJ.)
RE: About to meet DLJ
(17-10-2015 01:08 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  The Big Picture.

My evening with DLJ was going great, we acquainted ourselves over a fine Chinese dinner and toasted with a bottle of hot Sake. When we were done I brought out my computer and played a slide show of my favorite underwater images taken during our recent trip to Lembeh Strait in Northern Sulawesi and the area known as Raja Ampat (The Five Kings) off of West Papua, New Guinea, Indonesia.

DLJ gave them his undivided attention and when the slide show was finished he paid me a much appreciated compliment telling me that the photos had moved him but then he asked the probing question that has led me to this writing and that is; to what end? Besides the inherent beauty of the images of fish and coral reefs was there a further usefulness to capturing images of the underwater world?

I found myself struggling to defend my passion. I began stammering in an effort to give my work a greater meaning. I mentioned that we (my wife and I) were the largest contributors of fish identification images to the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute outside of the authors, that some of our findings were expanding the known range of species, that marine biologist regularly contacted us for the use of our images to publish in their papers, that we were going to be co-authors of an upcoming scientific paper that documented changes in species biogeography over a fifty year span and that we also sold our photos to be published in magazines, books and even to a museum. I also told him how we, as volunteers of a non-profit organization, give presentations twice a month to post-graduate interns and the public at large on fish behavior and identification. After regurgitating all of this I was still left with the empty feeling that perhaps this wasn’t enough to warrant all the time, effort and expense I devote to my obsession.

I found myself wrestling with my inner demons…fish pictures…big deal.

We left the Chinese restaurant and headed one floor up to a bar and continued to thoroughly enjoy ourselves telling stories of our life, family, travels and exotic foods we’ve eaten like horse meat stew in Mongolia and Guinea pig thermidor in Peru. Of course we also discussed the TTA forum and its cast of characters while DLJ imbibed Kahlua and Coke and I had multiple rounds of Glenmorangie single malt scotch that helped loosen our tongues to the point of sharing our middle names heretofore sworn to secrecy. Don’t even ask.

The night ended too soon, I was tired from a long day of travel and my flight would be early in the morning so we said our goodbyes and I left sincerely hoping that we would meet again in the future. DLJ, besides leaving me with the sense of having made a real connection, also left me with the nagging thought…fish pictures…big deal.

This morning as I walked the terminal in the Singapore airport I stopped at a bookstore to browse the pitifully small Science section. I bought a book entitled Ten Million Aliens about the weird life forms found on planet Earth and then I browsed through the latest issue of National Geographic and as I did this the answer to his query hit me.

I know why I do what I do, and that is for the sheer pleasure of gathering knowledge, personal knowledge mostly and sometimes if I’m lucky, adding to the greater body of science at large. Will any of this extrapolate to the betterment of the human condition? Probably not. But I am hopeful that if our images spur even one future marine biologist, one more person to care for our planet and its denizens, above or below the ocean surface, then maybe a pretty fish picture is more than what meets the eye and I can live with that.

Ooops.

Apologies for causing you some existential angst, there.

I agree that "adding to the body of knowledge" is a good answer to the "to what end?" question.

Thing is, I was being a little more specific with my question... I acknowledge the passion of the cataloguists (new word?) but was really trying to establish whether there was some mechanism (established or currently forming) that would link the research, that you and your peers are doing, to the action of addressing the damage being done by coral bombs etc (and the underlying social conditions that lead to that damage).

In other words ... how does your research lead to activism / policy change?

Edit: That question is not intended as a criticism in any way. I'm not saying that you personally have a duty to be any kind of activist.
Your pictures and your story stirred something in me. I felt your pain regarding the destruction of the habitat you love.
It seems like the next logical question ... What can be done? And what is being done?

Data (your pictures) should lead to Information (your story) should lead to Knowledge (global awareness) should lead to Wisdom (better decisions regarding economic and environmental policies).

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: