Academic credibility
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12-10-2013, 09:34 AM
RE: Academic credibility
My litmus test is publishing in a respected journal in the field in question.

Anyone can write a book, anyone can have an opinion.

Journal articles are scrutinized, first by editors and reviewers, then by the readership of the journal.

If an author is willing to submit his work to this and gets published, that's legitimacy right there. Doesn't matter if the content is later proven wrong or whatever, proves they're an expert.

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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16-10-2013, 12:42 PM
RE: Academic credibility
Almost every person who founded almost every exalted university in the West was a devout Theist if not a Christian. They were all religious, which is why there are so many "truth and virtue" portions of university mottos out there. Some of the schools that people "pray" to get into, including atheist supplicants, were started not as secular universities but as seminaries...

Harvard and Yale (originally Puritan) and Princeton (originally Presbyterian) once had rich Christian histories. Harvard was named after a Christian minister. Yale was started by clergymen, and Princeton’s first year of class was taught by Reverend Jonathan Dickinson. Princeton’s crest still says “Dei sub numine viget,” which is Latin for “Under God she flourishes.”

The people who gave the people who gave the people who gave the people who gave your peers and supervisors tenure were all Christians.

Checkmate, Cratheists.
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16-10-2013, 12:57 PM
RE: Academic credibility
^^Look at him there ^^... still struggling to convince himself to believe. Drinking Beverage

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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16-10-2013, 01:07 PM
RE: Academic credibility
(16-10-2013 12:57 PM)kim Wrote:  ^^Look at him there ^^... still struggling to convince himself to believe. Drinking Beverage

Just ignore him. Maybe he'll go away...
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16-10-2013, 01:12 PM
RE: Academic credibility
(16-10-2013 01:07 PM)Chopdoc Wrote:  
(16-10-2013 12:57 PM)kim Wrote:  ^^Look at him there ^^... still struggling to convince himself to believe. Drinking Beverage

Just ignore him. Maybe he'll go away...

Perhaps we should pray that he does. Tongue

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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16-10-2013, 01:13 PM
RE: Academic credibility
(16-10-2013 12:57 PM)kim Wrote:  ^^Look at him there ^^... still struggling to convince himself to believe. Drinking Beverage

He does unintentionally raise a point. All the great halls of learning in Europe were begun as seminaries. However now most have moved on to become very secular. If you take the presuppositions that God is real and Christianity is the true faith would the opposite not be true? If reality was exactly as proclaimed by the bible why would there be an inverse correlation between education and religion? As more of reality was discovered would it not bring people closer to God rather than push it further and further away into the few remaining gaps? Makes one wonder.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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16-10-2013, 01:14 PM
RE: Academic credibility
It shouldn't be that surprising, weren't clergy usually the most literate people all the way back to Roman times?

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16-10-2013, 01:42 PM
RE: Academic credibility
(11-10-2013 12:51 PM)Chopdoc Wrote:  I'm posting this as a new discussion thread because while it pertains to some current threads, it's a broader topic and I didn't want to derail any specific discussion. My thanks to Mark Fulton for being my sounding board before posting.

As a relative newcomer to online discussion/debate formats, including blogs, forums, “reply to” videos, and the ever-present accompanying comment sections, I’ve noticed the “my Ph.D. is bigger than your Ph.D.” argument used often. At times academics use this to dismiss or even ignore criticism of his or her work made by someone the scholar sees as not having the prerequisite gravitas. Without naming names, I’ve seen so-called religious apologists do this regularly and unfairly. Other times people cite an academic’s work to support their position, and then are (sometimes unfairly, sometimes with reason) accused of the argumentum ad verecundiam fallacy. Don't we all rely on expert opinion within a specific field to some extent? After all, we can’t all be PhD’s in every subject area we discuss. And aren’t we entitled to a considered opinion on a given topic? I try to evaluate evidence, compare what recognized experts have to say on said (relevant) data, and synthesize that into forming my own opinion.
While it would be unreasonable to expect a professional scholar to respond to every wing nut who posts on their blog or website, it is unfair to assume that a person’s assertions are invalid simply because they don’t have terminal degree letters after their name. I recognize that our society does not value undocumented knowledge—rightfully so in some cases, but I’ve also been to school (hold a Master’s and am an ABD in cultural musicology) and I think it’s a mistake to disregard a person’s independent study and conclusions if their statements are reasoned, credible, and have the support of evidence.

Hopefully this will generate some discussion. Tell me what you think.

I found this to be a good part of the conversation on the Amazon book reviews regarding Dr. Reza Aslan's book Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. Those disagreeing with the book sited his Ph.D not being exactly in religious studies and of course that he is a Muslim , those agreeing with the book were throwing around his scholarly degrees in religion. There's over 2000 reviews now and the comments go on forever, much of it arguing over who has what kind of academic degree. It goes on for pages and pages. Of course I side with Reza Asian and plan to read his book but after reading through many of the posts my brain is now numb.Shocking

http://www.amazon.com/Zealot-Life-Times-...140006922X

If you want to waste a good portion of the day read all the dolts with the one star reviews. Hobo

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16-10-2013, 02:06 PM
RE: Academic credibility
(16-10-2013 01:14 PM)Anjele Wrote:  It shouldn't be that surprising, weren't clergy usually the most literate people all the way back to Roman times?

In the lower middle ages in Europe, only the clergy and the aristocracy could read. The university system, with some exceptions, evolved from that circumstance. Not for nuthin', but that period of time is commonly referred to as the dark ages. It continued until the general level of literacy was raised, leading to the Enlightenment.
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16-10-2013, 02:35 PM
RE: Academic credibility
(16-10-2013 01:13 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  He does unintentionally raise a point. All the great halls of learning in Europe were begun as seminaries. However now most have moved on to become very secular. If you take the presuppositions that God is real and Christianity is the true faith would the opposite not be true? If reality was exactly as proclaimed by the bible why would there be an inverse correlation between education and religion? As more of reality was discovered would it not bring people closer to God rather than push it further and further away into the few remaining gaps? Makes one wonder.

Doesn't make me wonder, they did the best with what they had at the time. Something Philhellenes wrote sometime back:

Quote:Yes, many of those thinkers to whom I owe my mental freedom were religious, like Newton, a Christian, who believed God made the Earth but who then showed me why the Earth would have formed without a god's help. Or Plank and Schrodinger, two more Christians, who believed God ruled the Universe but showed me how God could not control a single electron. The discoveries these and many other people made, the laws they are famous for, are the very things that make gods getting humans pregnant, or angels whispering to prophets in caves, look infantile. I could never and would never question their intelligence. Their honesty and intellectual consistency are a different matter.

Weird...

I can stand on the shoulders of giants and see what even they seemingly could not.

I'm not against the Creator(s), if they exist, if they ever existed. I'm not against the search for the Creator(s). What blows MY mind is that people think religion has anything to do with it at all.

I can stand on the shoulders of giants and see what even they seemingly could not. That is what a university is for and what academic credibility is supposed to be about. Universities are charged with aiding in the progress of humanity, to strive for a continuously forward moving future, not stagnancy.

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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