Advice for joining the Navy
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14-10-2014, 04:17 PM
RE: Advice for joining the Navy
(13-10-2014 10:36 AM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  They did a 7 hour surgery called ... a genioplasty.

Wow. Did they make it bigger ? Tongue

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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14-10-2014, 04:22 PM
RE: Advice for joining the Navy
(14-10-2014 04:17 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  
(13-10-2014 10:36 AM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  They did a 7 hour surgery called ... a genioplasty.

Wow. Did they make it bigger ? Tongue

Yeah I have a chin now *beams* and my nose is straight, both side affects of the surgery. I had like a notch in my nose, but when they slid my jaws forward and bolted them to my skull, it pushed the lower end of my nose up, and now it is as straight as an arrow. I like the fact I have a chin now, my wife likes my new nose, win win.

"Belief is so often the death of reason" - Qyburn, Game of Thrones

"The Christian community continues to exist because the conclusions of the critical study of the Bible are largely withheld from them." -Hans Conzelmann (1915-1989)
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14-10-2014, 04:40 PM
RE: Advice for joining the Navy
I started my military career as a Navy CTM before eventually leaving and switching over to the Army. All I can add to what's already been said is that I really enjoyed my time in the Navy. It's not all sunshine and rainbows, of course, but it provides an opportunity to experience the world in a way that is damn near impossible in any other profession, and I wish I'd made more of it. I do love the Army, one way or another the military is in my blood, but I miss the Navy too. By the time my friends had finished college, assuming they weren't still working at McDonald's, I'd been to more countries than I can count on my fingers and toes.

Some were awesome, some were shitholes. But I value the experiences from both the good times and bad.

'Murican Canadian
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14-10-2014, 10:52 PM
RE: Advice for joining the Navy
(13-10-2014 10:36 AM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  
(11-10-2014 02:25 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  A very good friend of mine is in her first year of dental school. She has been talking to a Navy recruiter and the picture the Navy paints is very attractive. But I have brothers who went through some horrible times when the Navy promised one thing and did an about face on those promises many years ago.

Has anyone here been in the Navy recently and specifically as a corpman or even in dentistry? What questions would you ask? What guarantees can you expect?

Anyone a civilian dentist and have advice?

Thanks,

FC

I have been in the Navy now 28.5 years, active duty. Is your friend wanting to be a HM (corpsman, dental field) or going in via the direct commission route as a dentist?

What other options do they have? Are they wanting to enter so it can pay for their college (post 9/11 GI bill benefits) or pay for college debt already incurred? (navy has a program where you sign up for x years and they pay off your college debt) etc etc. There is good and bad in everything, depends on what their incentive is to join, what they wish to gain from it etc.

I was 17 yo, high school drop out, "too cool for school" or so I thought.

Joined the navy as a high school drop out. In the last 28 .5 years I have been promoted 10 times, earned a performance based officer commission, been on 9 deployments, 7 different ships, 3 shore commands, been around the world literally (world cruise 1988) been in every country, australia, romania, germany, spain, turkey the list goes forever...amazing experiences, invaluable world and life exposure to different cultures and foods and places and such.

I did do three tours in Iraq, but that is because of my field, I am a force protection specialist, ordnance specialist and missile fire control officer, so it isn't a surprise I was selected to go.

Speaking of teeth and benefits of service, I was born with amelogenesis imperfecta. The navy has spent over $250k fixing my mouth. They did a full reconstruction using herculite in 1994, then a full crown rehab a couple of years ago. I also recently had the worse case of obstructive sleep apnea they had ever seen. They did a 7 hour surgery called maxillomandibular advancement as well as a genioplasty. This broke my upper jaw and lower jaw, moved it forward about 1/3 of an inch, which opened my air way up, cut off my chin and moved it forward 1/3 of an inch, filling in the gaps with cadaver bone and held together with 15 titanium bars/plates and 30 titanium screws. They also while in there ripping me apart removed all the cartilage in my inner face to assist in air flow. The good news is I breathe amazingly well now and have zero sleep apnea, the bad news is there is some residual numbness. Cost? about $150k for this life saving surgery, and it didnt cost me a dime.

I am going to school full time, free of charge, each master's degree class costs about $1500, and they pick up the tab.

I make over $126k a year.

My retirement in a year and a half will be 75% of my base pay for life, payable monthly starting immediately, as well as being 100% disabled by VA and they will pay me an additional $20k a year for life. This adds up to just over $100k a year for life in retirement benefits, and because i am 100% disabled but employable, my kids will get to go to college for free as well, and then I will roll right into a high 5/low 6 figure government related job the second I retire.

I am in no way bragging, for it is nothing to brag about, it is my attempt to be transparent and show that the military isn't the horrible place people always think, it isn't the 'low paying job for those who can't make it in the real world" either. An E5 (can be promoted to that in 2-3 years of service) makes $55k a year, plus full benefits, and free college upon getting out. Oh, I got my high school diploma while in the navy, 2 bachelors and now working on my masters. Like everything else in life, it is what you make of it. If you have any questions, please let me know.

Thank you GWG for taking the time to elaborate. With your permission I'd like to copy/paste your reply to her. Again, thanks for including such detail, I think this will help her.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
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15-10-2014, 04:39 AM
RE: Advice for joining the Navy
(14-10-2014 10:52 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  
(13-10-2014 10:36 AM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  I have been in the Navy now 28.5 years, active duty. Is your friend wanting to be a HM (corpsman, dental field) or going in via the direct commission route as a dentist?

What other options do they have? Are they wanting to enter so it can pay for their college (post 9/11 GI bill benefits) or pay for college debt already incurred? (navy has a program where you sign up for x years and they pay off your college debt) etc etc. There is good and bad in everything, depends on what their incentive is to join, what they wish to gain from it etc.

I was 17 yo, high school drop out, "too cool for school" or so I thought.

Joined the navy as a high school drop out. In the last 28 .5 years I have been promoted 10 times, earned a performance based officer commission, been on 9 deployments, 7 different ships, 3 shore commands, been around the world literally (world cruise 1988) been in every country, australia, romania, germany, spain, turkey the list goes forever...amazing experiences, invaluable world and life exposure to different cultures and foods and places and such.

I did do three tours in Iraq, but that is because of my field, I am a force protection specialist, ordnance specialist and missile fire control officer, so it isn't a surprise I was selected to go.

Speaking of teeth and benefits of service, I was born with amelogenesis imperfecta. The navy has spent over $250k fixing my mouth. They did a full reconstruction using herculite in 1994, then a full crown rehab a couple of years ago. I also recently had the worse case of obstructive sleep apnea they had ever seen. They did a 7 hour surgery called maxillomandibular advancement as well as a genioplasty. This broke my upper jaw and lower jaw, moved it forward about 1/3 of an inch, which opened my air way up, cut off my chin and moved it forward 1/3 of an inch, filling in the gaps with cadaver bone and held together with 15 titanium bars/plates and 30 titanium screws. They also while in there ripping me apart removed all the cartilage in my inner face to assist in air flow. The good news is I breathe amazingly well now and have zero sleep apnea, the bad news is there is some residual numbness. Cost? about $150k for this life saving surgery, and it didnt cost me a dime.

I am going to school full time, free of charge, each master's degree class costs about $1500, and they pick up the tab.

I make over $126k a year.

My retirement in a year and a half will be 75% of my base pay for life, payable monthly starting immediately, as well as being 100% disabled by VA and they will pay me an additional $20k a year for life. This adds up to just over $100k a year for life in retirement benefits, and because i am 100% disabled but employable, my kids will get to go to college for free as well, and then I will roll right into a high 5/low 6 figure government related job the second I retire.

I am in no way bragging, for it is nothing to brag about, it is my attempt to be transparent and show that the military isn't the horrible place people always think, it isn't the 'low paying job for those who can't make it in the real world" either. An E5 (can be promoted to that in 2-3 years of service) makes $55k a year, plus full benefits, and free college upon getting out. Oh, I got my high school diploma while in the navy, 2 bachelors and now working on my masters. Like everything else in life, it is what you make of it. If you have any questions, please let me know.

Thank you GWG for taking the time to elaborate. With your permission I'd like to copy/paste your reply to her. Again, thanks for including such detail, I think this will help her.

Absolutely, let me know if she has any questions.

"Belief is so often the death of reason" - Qyburn, Game of Thrones

"The Christian community continues to exist because the conclusions of the critical study of the Bible are largely withheld from them." -Hans Conzelmann (1915-1989)
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