Advice from teachers please
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
18-06-2016, 03:14 PM (This post was last modified: 18-06-2016 03:17 PM by Banjo.)
RE: Advice from teachers please
Yesterday I found it physically difficult after my heavy procedures early in the week and by 11 am I knew I was in trouble. What I did was focus on what the students needed and tried to forget my problems. One student was a first timer. I really made a point of making her relax, feel zero pressure, and have fun.

By the time the hour was up I had her holding sticks properly, getting a proper bounce, reading basic rhythms, which at first she found tough, but with patience she went on to read an entire page of music and play it.

I thing had her count through a bar of four quarter notes and play a basic rock beat. Once she could do this, I had her play the same be, but using 8th notes. She ended up playing three rhythms and learning how to play and count whole, half, quarter and 8th notes. All within one hour.
She was ecstatic.

I told her of my own mistakes, common mistake people make. For example she made a mistake, but this mistake when played fluently, became a funk beat. So I showed her mistake played in that fashion. It blew her away.

Another teenage student who has trouble practicing at home, I made practice in class. As if it was a martial arts class In one hour we did 24 different sticking exercises. Later I sent him a text congratulating him. He was so happy.

What I like to do is pump the student up with positive energy. I make everything light hearted and easy going. I make them unafraid of screwing up. It seems to work.

Of course I teach on a one to one basis, but have lectured to larger classes and treated it the same.

This is what I do. It's not for everyone. I hear some teachers in the room next door sticking to one thing, afraid to move on. I dislike that approach and like to keep it fluid.

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like Banjo's post
18-06-2016, 05:51 PM
RE: Advice from teachers please
(18-06-2016 03:14 PM)Banjo Wrote:  Yesterday I found it physically difficult after my heavy procedures early in the week and by 11 am I knew I was in trouble. What I did was focus on what the students needed and tried to forget my problems. One student was a first timer. I really made a point of making her relax, feel zero pressure, and have fun.

By the time the hour was up I had her holding sticks properly, getting a proper bounce, reading basic rhythms, which at first she found tough, but with patience she went on to read an entire page of music and play it.

I thing had her count through a bar of four quarter notes and play a basic rock beat. Once she could do this, I had her play the same be, but using 8th notes. She ended up playing three rhythms and learning how to play and count whole, half, quarter and 8th notes. All within one hour.
She was ecstatic.

I told her of my own mistakes, common mistake people make. For example she made a mistake, but this mistake when played fluently, became a funk beat. So I showed her mistake played in that fashion. It blew her away.

Another teenage student who has trouble practicing at home, I made practice in class. As if it was a martial arts class In one hour we did 24 different sticking exercises. Later I sent him a text congratulating him. He was so happy.

What I like to do is pump the student up with positive energy. I make everything light hearted and easy going. I make them unafraid of screwing up. It seems to work.

Of course I teach on a one to one basis, but have lectured to larger classes and treated it the same.

This is what I do. It's not for everyone. I hear some teachers in the room next door sticking to one thing, afraid to move on. I dislike that approach and like to keep it fluid.

Kudos, man! You must be part Superman. My youngest brother went through surgery, chemo and radiation for laryngeal cancer, and pretty much got eaten alive by it- just "out of it", for a year and a half. He just got a job a couple of months ago, since he's now able. He's your age, and couldn't do a thing for almost a year after all that.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Fireball's post
18-06-2016, 07:47 PM
RE: Advice from teachers please
OK, first day a success! I was enthused, upbeat and happy to be there and it showed.

So glad you all piped in when I needed a boost!

FC

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Full Circle's post
18-06-2016, 07:56 PM
RE: Advice from teachers please
(16-06-2016 07:29 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  I just finished teaching yet another class and I find that my enthusiasm and pep is waning. Any advice on how to keep interested when the subject matter is old hat for you? Undecided

Maybe take a trip and explore something that is connected with your subject. I once upon a time was going thru immigration upon entering Panama and man asked me to help him fill out the immigration form. I did and he told me he had taught Spanish for 18 years , but had never learned any words beyond those required to teach his classes Spanish 1, Spanish 2, and Spanish 3 high school level.He hoped to rekindle his interest in teaching by coming to Panama and interacting with people in the language. He, as we talked pointed to a word on the form and said he had no idea what it was, and to another one and he did, it was taught in the third week of the second semester of Spanish 2!
I don't have any idea of what you teach, but something similar may help.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Born Again Pagan's post
18-06-2016, 08:04 PM
RE: Advice from teachers please
(18-06-2016 07:56 PM)Born Again Pagan Wrote:  
(16-06-2016 07:29 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  I just finished teaching yet another class and I find that my enthusiasm and pep is waning. Any advice on how to keep interested when the subject matter is old hat for you? Undecided

Maybe take a trip and explore something that is connected with your subject. I once upon a time was going thru immigration upon entering Panama and man asked me to help him fill out the immigration form. I did and he told me he had taught Spanish for 18 years , but had never learned any words beyond those required to teach his classes Spanish 1, Spanish 2, and Spanish 3 high school level.He hoped to rekindle his interest in teaching by coming to Panama and interacting with people in the language. He, as we talked pointed to a word on the form and said he had no idea what it was, and to another one and he did, it was taught in the third week of the second semester of Spanish 2!
I don't have any idea of what you teach, but something similar may help.

I spend most of my time underwater with the students when not in a classroom Big Grin

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Full Circle's post
22-06-2016, 12:18 PM
RE: Advice from teachers please
I think too often, we can succumb to teaching facts (especially depending on the class) which can get monotonous for everyone involved. I have recently been experimenting with getting students closer to the scientific method and how we use logic to draw conclusions. For example, in chemistry we not only teach reactions, but also reaction mechanisms. While we can directly observe the products of reactions, the mechanism of reactions (or how the reaction takes place) can only be inferred indirectly. So when teaching mechanisms, I begin with the data available (kinetics, stereochemistry, isotope effects, solvent effects, etc.) and state that whatever mechanism is proposed has to be consistent with the data. I further elaborate that you can't prove a mechanism, you can only disprove a mechanism and that just because a new piece of data is consistent with a mechanism, that does not prove the mechanism. At this point I sometimes get a students asking if we can't prove it why should we learn it? Just because we can't prove a mechanism it doesn't mean it is wrong. It may be that we are completely right in the mechanism, we just can't prove it (this is a good point to add that they would be surprised how many things we can't actually prove, but in spite of that look at all that science has accomplished). As such, a proposed mechanism goes out in the literature where other chemists will test it, maybe propose alternative mechanisms and if the mechanism stands the test of time without being disproven it becomes "accepted". I also stress that an "accepted" mechanism is still just the best truth for what we know and as we learn more that truth may have to change (this is also a pretty good life lesson). So, I use reaction mechanisms in this example, but the approach could be used for anything that is studied indirectly.

I have never felt comfortable doing lectures with powerpoint. I just feel like I am up there talking and the students just sit there listening. I prefer instead to make up skeleton notes that have the organization of a lecture with some of the information on them. I can then fill in the missing information as the lecture proceeds. I find this to be a happy medium between all power point and all "chalk" talks where the students write everything down that I write on the board. I have been using an ipad for these lectures that I can mirror on an apple tv and project on the screen. This allows me to walk around the class with the ipad and have students answer questions on the ipad and thus make it more interactive (you obviously have to handle it well if someone writes down the wrong answer).

Best of luck FC!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Iñigo's post
22-06-2016, 12:51 PM
RE: Advice from teachers please
(22-06-2016 12:18 PM)Iñigo Wrote:  I think too often, we can succumb to teaching facts (especially depending on the class) which can get monotonous for everyone involved. I have recently been experimenting with getting students closer to the scientific method and how we use logic to draw conclusions. For example, in chemistry we not only teach reactions, but also reaction mechanisms. While we can directly observe the products of reactions, the mechanism of reactions (or how the reaction takes place) can only be inferred indirectly. So when teaching mechanisms, I begin with the data available (kinetics, stereochemistry, isotope effects, solvent effects, etc.) and state that whatever mechanism is proposed has to be consistent with the data. I further elaborate that you can't prove a mechanism, you can only disprove a mechanism and that just because a new piece of data is consistent with a mechanism, that does not prove the mechanism. At this point I sometimes get a students asking if we can't prove it why should we learn it? Just because we can't prove a mechanism it doesn't mean it is wrong. It may be that we are completely right in the mechanism, we just can't prove it (this is a good point to add that they would be surprised how many things we can't actually prove, but in spite of that look at all that science has accomplished). As such, a proposed mechanism goes out in the literature where other chemists will test it, maybe propose alternative mechanisms and if the mechanism stands the test of time without being disproven it becomes "accepted". I also stress that an "accepted" mechanism is still just the best truth for what we know and as we learn more that truth may have to change (this is also a pretty good life lesson). So, I use reaction mechanisms in this example, but the approach could be used for anything that is studied indirectly.

I have never felt comfortable doing lectures with powerpoint. I just feel like I am up there talking and the students just sit there listening. I prefer instead to make up skeleton notes that have the organization of a lecture with some of the information on them. I can then fill in the missing information as the lecture proceeds. I find this to be a happy medium between all power point and all "chalk" talks where the students write everything down that I write on the board. I have been using an ipad for these lectures that I can mirror on an apple tv and project on the screen. This allows me to walk around the class with the ipad and have students answer questions on the ipad and thus make it more interactive (you obviously have to handle it well if someone writes down the wrong answer).

Best of luck FC!

Bolding mine. Beautiful phrasing of the Scientific Method! Next time some dip tries to tell you that science is wrong, you can give this as a reply. Science is a process (read that around here somewhere, heh heh).
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: