Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
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03-06-2017, 09:35 PM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
(03-06-2017 09:02 PM)Clockwork Wrote:  A guy my nro knows says we're developing "old man strength."

I swear that's a real thing. I think the previously mentioned filter carries over physically in some ways. The decrease in actual muscular strength is offset by the ability to not hold back.

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03-06-2017, 09:49 PM (This post was last modified: 03-06-2017 09:58 PM by jennybee.)
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
Life goes so fast, I try and just enjoy the ride, and take care of myself as best as I can so I can weather growing older as best as I can.

I remember in college, one of my courses was The Sociology of Aging. One of our assignments was to look at images in the media and in popular culture-in terms of how older adults are portrayed. The stereotypes and negative imagery across the board were pretty rampant. I think that is such a sad commentary about our culture.
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03-06-2017, 10:01 PM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
Myself I found I just couldn't put out the work I could just 10 years ago. I've always done physical work but just can't at 71 years old.
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03-06-2017, 10:22 PM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
(03-06-2017 08:46 PM)Dom Wrote:  The 50s are super! Old enough to know what you want and young enough to do it. The 60s are still quite good too, depending on your health.

After that it just comes down to health. Which is why so many old people talk about it - everything depends on it then and it goes further and further south as your body parts wear out. Broken bones used to mean a cast signed by all your friends - when you are old, it is often a harbinger of death. Your body doesn't repair and maladies never pass, they become chronic.

Up until physical deterioration, being older is an asset as far as I am concerned.

I just returned from spending a few days with my 78 year old aunt. We went on a little road trip and ended up wading up to our knees in the bone chilling waters of Lake Superior, looking for unusual rocks. The next day, we went to Lake Itasca and walked thigh deep, twenty feet across the headwaters of the mighty Mississippi as it spills out of the lake to begin it's journey.

Just getting out to these bodies of water took some considerable walking & maneuvering over large boulders. It certainly made her daughter, my younger cousin, do some huffing and puffing! We had to take my cousin, of course - it was her 50th birthday road trip. Wink

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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03-06-2017, 10:27 PM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
Laugh out load Been there with that! I've never actually discriminated against older (or younger) people, but have always tried to make sure to take people as they come. I've had management give me some "advice" about someone who came to work under me, but I've always allowed them to find their own level (of course, while providing feedback and a safety net- we did stuff that cost millions, if a mistake was made). I was asked at the age of 60 how many more years I was going to work. Strictly illegal, but that is how my last company operated, at least in our department. I told them 5 years. Two years later (when I had not been promoted, though I had been told I would be), I talked with my money guy, who told me I could retire at 62. The company was putting lots of young (pretty much unqualified) people into positions of some real responsibility, while not promoting the true high performers in the higher age brackets. The phrase "younging up the management" was mentioned. It's a joke, when one considers that those young people hadn't been there long enough to know much. When I retired, it took 3 people to do what I had been doing. Might be a point of pride, but the company makes more money that way, since they can bill the gov by how many asses they have warming chairs. Dodgy It was to the point where I was educating Configuration Management (as an engineer) on the process for approving and releasing a drawing I had made. I took the money and ran. I'm more than happy to relax, take wood carving classes, carve on the side, and do other activities that I enjoy. One thing that I am entertaining is to approach the local school district with some teaching time in topics which I have quite a bit of experience. Not a full time job, but something that will interest the local youth in STEM education.
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03-06-2017, 10:37 PM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
(03-06-2017 09:35 PM)yakherder Wrote:  
(03-06-2017 09:02 PM)Clockwork Wrote:  A guy my brother knows says we're developing "old man strength."

I swear that's a real thing... The decrease in actual muscular strength is offset by the ability to not hold back.
We have an unscientific hypothesis: It might be underlying changes, too. Over the years, we get microfractures, ligament & tendon tears, and so on. When the body repairs itself it hardens. That and maybe the body learns how to more effectively use what it's got.
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03-06-2017, 11:58 PM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
Quote:Yep, it takes me longer to get shit done, and it annoys me, too.

Like.. literally..? because my Dad will spend like a good 45minutes on the crapper.

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04-06-2017, 05:00 AM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
Preemptive nostalgia's what I'm trying to achieve at this point (in my 50s). I'm healthy, have much less offspring wrangling to do, in a relatively stable situation, busy, living in a great area, figured out some stuff, etc. I'm trying to enjoy it now rather than wait a decade and then look back on it and think, why was I so stressed and miserable? An advantage of getting older (for me) is to be able to stop taking seriously other people's pronouncements about what's acceptable. But my old-dar pings way more than it used to.
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04-06-2017, 05:20 AM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
(03-06-2017 08:15 PM)Dom Wrote:  First you can't wait to be old enough for this or that.
Then life keeps you jumping with kids or careers or whatever.
Then you wake up old.

From what I have read, our perceptions of time depends in large part on how many specific memories we have -- i.e. if you remember a lot, the time seems longer.

Because so many of us are engrossed with our work for most of our adult lives, most of what could make up our perception of time in our lives is work-related. However, once we retire we stop thinking about all those details and soon forget them. The result is that we feel, all of a sudden, as if we just woke up old -- just as you said.

It's a perceptual trick of a kind.

Hobo
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04-06-2017, 06:44 AM
RE: Age discrimination (yep, applied to young and old)
(04-06-2017 05:20 AM)Thoreauvian Wrote:  
(03-06-2017 08:15 PM)Dom Wrote:  First you can't wait to be old enough for this or that.
Then life keeps you jumping with kids or careers or whatever.
Then you wake up old.

From what I have read, our perceptions of time depends in large part on how many specific memories we have -- i.e. if you remember a lot, the time seems longer.

Because so many of us are engrossed with our work for most of our adult lives, most of what could make up our perception of time in our lives is work-related. However, once we retire we stop thinking about all those details and soon forget them. The result is that we feel, all of a sudden, as if we just woke up old -- just as you said.

It's a perceptual trick of a kind.

Hobo

Interesting. Makes a lot of sense.

Because it seems that the times when you are in a regular routine end up becoming a blur, but times of change are properly imprinted. And, unfortunately, for most people the bulk of the years pass with one day being much like the next one, with some small diversions thrown in.

Just about everyone with kids complains that they grow up so fast. Kids change almost imperceptibly every day. Every now and then people step back and realize their kid has long entered another phase of life.

There is probably something to this "making memories" thing.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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