Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
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16-02-2016, 09:09 AM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
(16-02-2016 08:57 AM)Nurse Wrote:  The world made much more sense without a god, certainly functions as if there is no God.

These are some perfect words. "certainly functions as if there is no god".

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16-02-2016, 12:05 PM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
(16-02-2016 09:09 AM)Heatheness Wrote:  
(16-02-2016 08:57 AM)Nurse Wrote:  The world made much more sense without a god, certainly functions as if there is no God.

These are some perfect words. "certainly functions as if there is no god".

+1

When people chat with me about my beliefs, this is the direction I steer them toward by saying, "If you just remove your god from the equation, EVERYTHING makes sense." It's so true.

Why are we here? Because we're here. Roll the bones.

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16-02-2016, 12:11 PM (This post was last modified: 16-02-2016 12:18 PM by carol.)
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
(13-01-2016 06:58 AM)edbaldwin Wrote:  I was baptised Catholic but was never forced to take religion seriously. I prayed a nighttime prayer as a kid. Asked God to fix certain situations as an adult but often questioned if he existed. My ah ha moment is still something I can't forgive myself for.
My mom was dying from pancreas cancer. She was religious as well as a certain set of aunt and uncle that was in the room. My mom was very sick and unable to speak. Their pastor was in the room and they started in with trying to save me. My mom was giving me a really concerned look and my aunt and uncle were trying to be persuasive. I realized I had totally lost my faith when I couldn't even pretend to go along with it. After my mom died my aunt and uncle told me that my mom told them how much it would mean to her to see me saved. I know let my mom down. Even though she doesn't know anyone, I do.
Ed

So sorry to hear this, you were simply being honest and were unwilling to lie about it, I hope that you can feel better over time about this.
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16-02-2016, 12:29 PM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
No "a-ha" moment for me. I was raised a Southern Baptist. My first questioning start when I was about nine or ten, after we moved overseas and were exposed to different religions.

My faith took a sturdy hammerblow with the Revolution in 1978, where the Problem of Evil finally occurred to me.

But it took a few more years of me fighting a rearguard action against the erosion of my faith before I stopped being afraid and said, "I don't believe in god".

And even after realizing that I was an atheist, it still took me a few years before I found myself in the light of reason -- I spent a few years wandering the wilderness of wooism first.
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16-02-2016, 01:13 PM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
Yes and no, or sort of. Consider

I never felt I believed in God or Christianity, but our mother took us to church/Sunday school weekly.
I suppose she thought it fair to expose us to it or that it was the socially acceptable or proper thing to do.

I recall sitting in Sunday school class when I was 9 or 10 half listening to the teacher going on about some story like the flood or Jonah.
He was the father of a classmate and a colonel in the Air Force, yet he was telling this fairy tale as though it were a fact or part of history.

I was looking at the maps in my Bible (we were given a Bible at the end of third grade) and suddenly thought,
"Wait, does he actually believe that?" The idea that a grown-up actually took the stories seriously made me cringe.
I got the idea that the stories were like fairy tales or fables that had some lesson embedded,
but it had never occurred to me before that people actually thought they were factual. Shocking

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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17-02-2016, 06:44 AM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
I did't really carefully consider or question Christianity until about the age of 10. When I dd, I had some serious doubts. Within a year or two I decided that the Christians were wrong - at least about the historical accounts. I had serious doubts as to the rest of it as well. By the time I was 13 I didn't believe in any of it. At thirteen we got the internet in our house. I eventually came across quotes from some of histories best known deists and atheists. That's how I discovered that there were others really. They had also taken considerations which I had not yet made.. I don't remember the first time I saw the term 'atheist' or learned what it meant, but it's not something I learned about at home, certainly. Such things were not discussed.

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17-02-2016, 08:34 AM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
I read the bible around the same time I read Grimm's fairy tales, at age 10. Up to then I loved religion, although I skipped church on occasion and lied during confession (made up sins since I couldn't think of any real ones).

After reading the bible I figured it was at the same level as Grimm's and put both books away and haven't opened them since. I quit going to church but still got the rituals - communion and confirmation. (Catholic).

My parents were not church goers, and I didn't find out until decades after that they were atheist. They never actively influenced me.

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17-02-2016, 03:12 PM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
(16-02-2016 01:13 PM)Chas Wrote:  Yes and no, or sort of. Consider

I never felt I believed in God or Christianity, but our mother took us to church/Sunday school weekly.
I suppose she thought it fair to expose us to it or that it was the socially acceptable or proper thing to do.

I recall sitting in Sunday school class when I was 9 or 10 half listening to the teacher going on about some story like the flood or Jonah.
He was the father of a classmate and a colonel in the Air Force, yet he was telling this fairy tale as though it were a fact or part of history.

I was looking at the maps in my Bible (we were given a Bible at the end of third grade) and suddenly thought,
"Wait, does he actually believe that?" The idea that a grown-up actually took the stories seriously made me cringe.
I got the idea that the stories were like fairy tales or fables that had some lesson embedded,
but it had never occurred to me before that people actually thought they were factual. Shocking

This was essentially my experience. I was raised Catholic, but if I ever actually believed, it would have been around the same time that I was still young enough to think Santa was real. I have no conscious memory of ever being religious. I just put up with Sunday school and Mass for the sake of my mother.

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17-02-2016, 03:21 PM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
I was a never believer (though I did try for a little bit, always felt like mimicry more than anything though, never real) so I've never had any aha moments when it comes to losing faith.

I have had other Ah ha moments in my life though.
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25-02-2016, 09:31 PM
RE: Ah Ha Moment, did you have one?
I grew up protestant. I went to private school for my elementary education. I went to church regularly, and have strongly religious family. I even studied an a major christian university. I majored in Philosophy with a minor in Biblical Studies.

There were several things that led me away. First, my studies in Philosophy. I took philosophy of religion classes and learned apologetic arguements. But there were several that were unconvincing (arguement from design, the ontological arguement). Second, I was exposed to other thoughts and ideas in Christianity. All of the ideas were mutually exclusive. I was already deviating away from standard christian beleif. I lost my beleif in mind body dualism, and was often accused of being a closet deist. But the final straw for me came a month ago.

Last year was the worst in my entire life, and I prayed and my family and friends prayed too. None of them were answered. No prayers get answered. I then concluded that God does not exist.
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