Poll: Why do Americans re-make British sit-coms?
Americans don't get clever humour
Americans tend to avoid non-American shows
Both
Neither
Other
I have no idea, I just wanna vote so I don't feel left out
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American Perception Of Non-American Comedy
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10-08-2013, 11:08 PM
RE: American Perception Of Non-American Comedy
(10-08-2013 11:05 PM)evenheathen Wrote:  ...
I'm assuming you did get the implied sarcasm in my post, I forgot to apply the sarcasm font
...

I thought you were attempting irony.

But as everyone knows... Murikans can't do irony.

Big Grin

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10-08-2013, 11:15 PM
RE: American Perception Of Non-American Comedy
(10-08-2013 11:08 PM)DLJ Wrote:  
(10-08-2013 11:05 PM)evenheathen Wrote:  ...
I'm assuming you did get the implied sarcasm in my post, I forgot to apply the sarcasm font
...

I thought you were attempting irony.

But as everyone knows... Murikans can't do irony.

Big Grin

I dunno bout that ask the Iraqis about how we stabilized their government.
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(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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10-08-2013, 11:16 PM
RE: American Perception Of Non-American Comedy
(10-08-2013 11:08 PM)DLJ Wrote:  
(10-08-2013 11:05 PM)evenheathen Wrote:  ...
I'm assuming you did get the implied sarcasm in my post, I forgot to apply the sarcasm font
...

I thought you were attempting irony.

But as everyone knows... Murikans can't do irony.

Big Grin

Consider

Dodgy



That was sarcasm, right? I can never keep it straight.Rolleyes

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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11-08-2013, 02:43 AM
RE: American Perception Of Non-American Comedy
This thread inspired a longish rant about TV. Thought it might interest some of you. It's over in Health and Psychology, here. It has a link to a cool song, too.

I AM he who is called... cat furniture.
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11-08-2013, 03:04 AM
RE: American Perception Of Non-American Comedy
(10-08-2013 07:43 PM)Hughsie Wrote:  Something that has been discussed between forum members on Skype recently is the perception in parts of the world that Americans don't "get" British humour. I think this stems from the fact that, while good American sit-coms are exported to the UK, good UK sit-coms are generally re-made for American audiences. This got me wondering why this is. I've come to two possible conclusions;

1) Americans just don't get clever humour.

2) Americans have a tendency to avoid shows with non-American characters set in other countries.

Anyone agree with either of these, or does anyone have any other conclusions?

Wait a tick! I know this is a reference to me Big Grin As I pointed out, I rather like a lot of British comedies. Of course the classics are huge in America, like Monty Python, and to a lesser extent the likes of Bean, Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, The Office, The Ricky Gervais Show, and so on.

What I asked you is not what you heard, rather, I asked the opposite. Why do so many British people think that Americans don't get British humor?

I grew up watching Monty Python's Flying Circus Tongue You can keep The Inbetweeners though. Though very popular over in the UK, it is kinda meh. Big Grin

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11-08-2013, 04:13 PM (This post was last modified: 11-08-2013 07:46 PM by Atheist_pilgrim.)
RE: American Perception Of Non-American Comedy
(10-08-2013 07:43 PM)Hughsie Wrote:  Something that has been discussed between forum members on Skype recently is the perception in parts of the world that Americans don't "get" British humour. I think this stems from the fact that, while good American sit-coms are exported to the UK, good UK sit-coms are generally re-made for American audiences. This got me wondering why this is. I've come to two possible conclusions;

1) Americans just don't get clever humour.

2) Americans have a tendency to avoid shows with non-American characters set in other countries.

Anyone agree with either of these, or does anyone have any other conclusions?

Hughsie, you ignorant wanker! (Kudos if you get that American comedy riff) Have you ever seen "Episodes" on Showtime? It's a series that's all about the process of taking an English show and remaking it for the American market. Good stuff - you should check it out.

Bottom line, it boils down to money. English shows tend to have a couple of "series" that total out to a couple of dozen episodes. While the level of quality is usually undeniable ("Spaced" and "The Office" come to mind), that's hardly enough episodes to make it in syndication, which is a big moneymaker in US TV. According to Wikipedia, you need around 100 episodes to become viable for syndication, which is probably why English comedies are confined to the BBC and PBS channels. Plus, Hollywood's got plenty of starving actors and crews to keep employed, and there's always the benefit of owning all the rights to a show.

That said, there are certainly American demographics that prefer their shows to be all-American. Heck, I loved the UK Office, but even I, a fan of various English comedies and films, didn't understand all of the British vocabulary and nuances (I believe there's a subtitle option for my Office DVDs that helps clear up the dividing differences in our common language). But as for me, I say keep the English series and movies coming!
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