An Atheist who Found God
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29-12-2016, 06:21 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
(29-12-2016 05:44 PM)PeacefulHeart Wrote:  I've known about the God Helmet for several years. I knew about it before my vision and I remember thinking it was interesting. I don't know all of the details on it anymore. Just, this happened when I wasn't wearing any such helmet.

Just My $0.02 CDN on behalf of the medical community: It isn't the helmet that generated the apparent spiritual experiences, but rather the area of the brain that was stimulated by the helmet. I have no reason to doubt that you had something profound happen to you, but am disinclined to think that anything supernatural is behind it.

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29-12-2016, 06:32 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
Quote:Nope, I did not. I wish I could show people what I saw, but I can't.

Imagine that! No picture...gosh darn it! Where was your phone?
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29-12-2016, 06:37 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
(29-12-2016 05:44 PM)PeacefulHeart Wrote:  Usually, the most obvious cause for a hallucination is schizophrenia and I've never been diagnosed with this. I'm also well past the age range for which it onsets. I don't have any other disorders that are associated with hallucinations.

There are many things that can trigger a hallucination and not all require any underlying condition. It also doesn't imply any on-going condition and may have just been a transient misfiring due to stress or diet or any number of factors.

Quote: The feeling that it was the God of the Bible was simply very strong and undeniable to me. When I had my vision, I felt it to my core, in my heart. It was very personal.

Unfortunately, your conviction about what it was is probably the least reliable gauge. People can "feel" all sorts of things to be true but with no way to repeat the condition and no actual evaluation by somebody qualified it all adds up to nothing.

Quote: I can't make anyone believe it. I think coming to God, in a lot of ways, requires putting a lot of arguments and desire for scientific evidence aside. I became a Christian, not because of arguments, but because of my experience. I think that's really the basis of belief or lack of belief.

Sorry, belief that isn't based on repeatable, demonstrable, testable evidence is of no value. Once you decide to set aside evidence you are setting aside rational thought. It may be comforting but it is a security blanket at best. I prefer the cold light of reality to the warm darkness of delusion.

You may have been an atheist at one point; it doesn't sound like you were a skeptic or a critical thinker.

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29-12-2016, 06:47 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
(29-12-2016 05:44 PM)PeacefulHeart Wrote:  
(29-12-2016 02:21 PM)Impulse Wrote:  Welcome to TTA. I won't argue with you here since this is the introductions forum. But I just wanted to say that your experience is not uncommon (in fact, another poster came here with a very similar story not very long ago) and there are explanations having nothing to do with any god.

That's true. I was very glad to find my experience wasn't uncommon. It was a great comfort to me to find stories of people who saw and felt all of the same things. There are other explanations, of course. There always are with these things. I just believe otherwise.

If you know about them and still choose to believe otherwise, that is a deliberate refusal to consider a reasonable explanation for fiction. Why should I care about what you believe if you are unprepared to justify it.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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29-12-2016, 06:49 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
(29-12-2016 01:25 PM)PeacefulHeart Wrote:  Hello, everyone. My name is Kathryn and I was an atheist for, at least, 15 years. Very recently, I became a Christian. I’ll get into that in a bit. First, I want to provide some background.

So, as young as age 10, I remember really despising the teachings of the Bible. I was very rebellious and vocal in Sunday school, openly criticizing God and stories like Lot’s wife and Abraham’s son. I said numerous times that, if God were real, I would never worship Him. The stories just seemed so inhumane and backwards that I came to conclude that God and the Bible were entirely fictitious and invented by people who thought morality and decent behavior wasn’t possible without religion, so they had to send fear into everyone with stories of Heaven and Hell. I never had any positive experiences with God. He really seemed to not be there at all. I thought the Christians around me were complete morons, incapable of critical thought for believing the Bible, and merely worshiping out of fear. When I was 14, I called myself an atheist. When I was around 15 or so, I read Richard Dawkins' book The God Delusion. I was very happy someone had put every argument I ever had against Christianity and religion into a book and I walked away for good, pretty much hating religion, but especially Christianity.

Aside from that, I grew up being a loner and a total nerd. Books, computers, science fiction television shows, and card collecting were my life. I did very well in school. I’ve always had a passion for education, learning, and bettering oneself intellectually. I loved math and science (still do). I loved math so much I would ask for extra math homework. I would even beg my teachers to let me skip recess so I could do more schoolwork. Even in elementary school, I enjoyed reading biology textbooks so much more than reading fiction. My dream was to pursue a college degree in every field imaginable and basically spend my life in academia.

So, I went off to college with dreams of studying biochemistry and genetics. I wanted to get a PhD and do epigenetics research. I was really fascinated with understanding how humans differed from one another at the smallest level. I loved this idea that humans are basically biological programs and our code is our DNA. I really wanted to spend my life in a laboratory, in solitude, conducting research that could somehow change everything. That didn’t work out for me though. Although I made great grades and got along well with my professors, early on I started to become incredibly overwhelmed. I felt like I was just mentally breaking down every semester and becoming increasingly unhealthy. I discovered I had Asperger’s Syndrome, now Autism Spectrum Disorder, and, even with accommodations, I was forced to drop out.

This was, to me, the worst thing that could’ve happened. It was my lifelong dream to get a PhD, and, for a while, it was like my world had shattered. I’d never gotten to the point where I just didn’t want to read another scientific article or pick up another chemistry textbook. It was like all of my passion got beaten out of me. A lot of people I knew who were becoming doctors, pursuing their PhD dream, attending top-tier schools, were utterly miserable in college, like myself, and I could see that was the road I was on.

Eventually, I moved on, and became happy I dropped out. I realized it really was for the best and pursued another STEM career. I was also living in this really neat city where almost no one was Christian, surrounded by other really smart people. I had money because my boyfriend had a really good job. There were lots of free activities, neat places to see, fun things to do, lots of shopping, and we traveled. It really seemed like we had everything. But after two years, it began to feel like it was just empty. I wasn’t depressed or anything. I just felt underwhelmed and began to ask myself, “Is this it?”

Then, on my birthday of this year, something completely unexpected happened to me. I had a vision, and I saw the Light of God. I don’t say that figuratively, although I understand if you wouldn’t believe me. I saw God’s Light. It was so pure, clean, and white. It was just glorious and I felt so much truth coming from the Light. Words fail to describe the beauty of what I saw and it was the most beautiful, profound experience of my life. I felt this amazing, amazing peace in my heart as well as forgiveness, love, purity, beauty, kindness. I knew God was this infinite Love and that He was the source of all love in ourselves and in the world. I could see how He stretched on for all eternity and was so much greater than the universe and that He created the universe. Immediately, part of the Bible verse Revelation 1:8 came to mind: “I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End,” says the Lord, “who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty.”

Anyway, after it happened, I fell to the floor and cried so much. It was the first time I ever felt I was lost without God. I knew how wrong I had been about the God of the Bible. I knew there is nothing bad about God and that He is pure and does everything for an ultimate good.

After that, I found a bunch of other people online who had such incredibly similar experiences that I was certain I wasn’t losing it. There are tons of videos on YouTube of people who’ve seen God, people who've seen Jesus, people with near death experiences who’ve died and went to Heaven, and people who were miraculously healed by God. I watched these and knew I wasn’t alone. I began to pray to God to prove to me if it was really Him, if He was really there, and to show me the way. I hadn’t prayed since I was, maybe, 14, and it felt very strange and awkward. But, God heard me. So many things have happened since, like feeling total joy, feeling complete lack of fear, feeling like I could die and go straight to Heaven because I felt Heaven in my heart. He’s answered all of my prayers and my life and my heart have changed so much.

Some things still remain. I still love learning, science, and education. I’m still pretty liberal. I still think I’m a critical thinker. Now, though, I don’t believe Christians are brainwashed idiots for believing anymore like I used to think. I cry now when someone says they’ll pray for me instead of becoming absolutely furious at what I perceived to be an unhelpful absurdity. I believe there is an afterlife. I feel I’ve come away with some useful understanding because of this experience and I wanted to share it with you. I would love the opportunity to post on the forum. I don’t hate atheists at all. All of my friends, except one, are atheists. My intention is to be respectful and not cross any boundaries. Given that, I think we could have some interesting debates together. Of course, I’m open to any questions you have. If you’ve managed to make it this far, thanks for reading!

popsthebuilder had a vision too. Perhaps we have a match here.

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29-12-2016, 06:51 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
Thread Moved

The into section isn't a place for a detailed or in depth discussion on delusion or religion or belief -- the intro section is more for people to say, "hi I'm here." and others to respond with "welcome".


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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29-12-2016, 06:55 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
(29-12-2016 06:21 PM)Astreja Wrote:  
(29-12-2016 05:44 PM)PeacefulHeart Wrote:  I've known about the God Helmet for several years. I knew about it before my vision and I remember thinking it was interesting. I don't know all of the details on it anymore. Just, this happened when I wasn't wearing any such helmet.

Just My $0.02 CDN on behalf of the medical community: It isn't the helmet that generated the apparent spiritual experiences, but rather the area of the brain that was stimulated by the helmet. I have no reason to doubt that you had something profound happen to you, but am disinclined to think that anything supernatural is behind it.

Welcome to our community. May you find many interesting questions and answers here.

Thank you, Astreja. That is what I would have replied (I've been out, most of the day). I was not trying to indicate that the OP was wearing the God Helmet, but rather indicating that the God Helmet demonstrates that these sort of phenomena are not at all supernatural, but are something wired into even normal human brains-- wiring which can be artificially triggered by the use of the helmet.

It's actually related to temporal lobe epilepsy (not the same as Grand Mal-type epilepsy) that can also be induced by extreme emotional states, deep meditation or prayer, or a number of other factors.

Schizoprenia is not the only cause of visions; it is simply a condition in which the person continually has hallucinations.

In other words, it's a natural phenomenon, based on how brains work (or malfunction), and that's why people seeing such visions always have visions that align with religious programming they have absorbed from their culture.

When a guy in New Guinea who has never heard of Christianity walks out of the jungle and contacts the first scientist he meets, saying "I had a vision of someone called Jesus, and don't know who that is. Can you help me?", then it will be more plausible.

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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29-12-2016, 06:58 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
(29-12-2016 01:25 PM)PeacefulHeart Wrote:  I still think I’m a critical thinker.

No, you're not.

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29-12-2016, 07:11 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
(29-12-2016 06:49 PM)Anjele Wrote:  [he-who-shall-not-be-named] had a vision too. Perhaps we have a match here.

don't go bringing him back, it's been nice lately without his ramblings

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29-12-2016, 07:34 PM
RE: An Atheist who Found God
As a Christian, I'm skeptical of your "divine experience".

I would first exhaust all medical and psychological options before you claim it as divine.

I've hallucinated, had sleep paralysis once and I've had many lucid dreams. I can tell you right now, with all honesty, to every sense of my humanity, it felt as if those experiences were a part of "real life".

However, the more I analyzed them, approached the situation without prejudices, looked at them rationally and from a place of science, I realized that these experiences weren't out of this world much less divine. They are simply a manipulation of our mind and senses by the awesome power of our brain.

Try to approach your experience as a skeptic... it's only then that you have truthful discernment.

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