Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
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17-09-2015, 10:01 AM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
(17-09-2015 09:24 AM)MrKrispy601 Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 05:59 AM)Octapulse Wrote:  I feel like I'm watching you slowly turn into Jerry Seinfeld

I was thinking the exact same thing.

It's pretty easy to tell me from Jerry Seinfeld....

One is trim, rich, good looking and gets laid a lot.....

The other one is me....

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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17-09-2015, 10:05 AM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
My mom collects antiques. I like more modern decor so I don't really like that sort of thing unless it is in a museum. However, I do collect vintage jewelry. There are some cool pieces that are quite unique and I don't mind spending a little extra for them.
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17-09-2015, 10:13 AM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
I love looking at antiques and speculating about the lives of the people who made and used them, but I don't have any in my house. Not my aesthetic, and not in my budget. If I had the funds, I might collect antique musical instruments and manuscripts, because those are meaningful to me.

My criteria when acquiring furniture:
1. I like the look of it,
2. I don't have to assemble it, and
3. I won't have a nervous breakdown if the cat vomits on it.
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17-09-2015, 10:48 AM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
(17-09-2015 08:45 AM)Mr. Boston Wrote:  Coming from New England, the birthplace of "antiques" with some of the oldest crap in America kicking around I agree that the pricing can be ridiculous. Really hardcore antique buffs are some of the weirdest people you'd ever care to meet. But I also understand the attraction. Can we honestly say we expect the couches, beds, and dressers being cranked out today to stand up to 200+ years of daily use? Sure, I can get a super cheap particle-board bookcase, maybe even with some kind of warrantee, but do I even WANT a piece of furniture like that to last the rest of my life? When you buy an antique bookshelf or end table the "warrantee" is essentially the plain fact that it was built during the Taft administration and it's still standing. If it's already outlasted a few generations of human beings, I'm fairly sure my books aren't going to utterly screw it up.

There's some truth to the old "they don't make 'em like they used to" mantra. They don't. It would deleterious for modern businesses to produce goods that last 50 or 100 years. There's a lot more profit in making something that'll do the job for 5-10 years and then need to be replaced. Back in the day though, when everything was made by hand with natural materials, you attracted customers by producing the BEST rocking chair or end table; something people could buy and feel secure would never need to be replaced. It was expensive because someone spent 100s of hours skillfully making the object, you paid for the craftsmanship as much as the object itself. I can see the appeal in that. There's not much I side with hipsters about, but their focus on artisanal, bespoke objects does make sense to me, it's a way to make economies more local again and hopefully produce a higher quality of goods. Maybe it's not so much that antique furniture is way too expensive as it is that modern furniture is way too cheap.

When my wife and I got married, my mother gave us a couple hundred bucks specifically to be used to purchase an antique rocking chair. She had a really old rocking chair when my brother and I were born and it meant a lot to her that we'd have something to rock our future babies in, something that would stand up to time. So we found a really cool looking chair from around 1905. It's our only antique "piece" but it's outlasted ALL the more affordable IKEA modular-construction crapola we furnished our first apartment with, and the odds are good our great-grandchildren will one day rock their kids to sleep in it. I don't think there are a lot of consumer goods being made these days that can live up to that kind of expectation.

That said, the obvious downside is most families I know of have tons of old stuff hanging around from some long-deceased great great aunt they never even met. So maybe longevity is a curse too, lol.

My kitchen table and chairs are over 100 years old now.

Purchased by husband's great great grandmother, passed to his great mother, who passed it onto her son when he got married. That table has been used constantly. It was the pasta table, the wine making table...until we got it and have used it for just about every single meal for the last 15 years!

When we got married we got a table set 8 piece (1 table, one 1 leaf, 6 chairs)...it didn't last 10 years...and the first 5 were before kids and honestly, we hardly used it.

The faux top started peeling...the chairs wobbled and eventually started to just fall apart. You know it's bad when a toddler (who wieghed barely 20lbs soaking wet) sits on a chair and it cracks. By the time we got rid of it, we only three chairs.

Yet this old table, with four original chairs has outlasted just about everything! Countless spills, endless homework struggles....The gears to put in the leafs still work even, which is kinda amazing.

So yeah, I'll take the old set over the new crap today.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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17-09-2015, 12:01 PM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
My house was built in the 1880's....

Anybody want to trade for one built this year - of the same size???


No???

hmmmmmm.....

See how that works???

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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17-09-2015, 12:03 PM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
(17-09-2015 12:01 PM)onlinebiker Wrote:  My house was built in the 1880's....

Anybody want to trade for one built this year - of the same size???


No???

hmmmmmm.....

See how that works???

Ooooooh I totally would trade.

You can have this poorly put together over priced price of shit with its plastic pipes.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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17-09-2015, 12:09 PM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
LOL....

SOLD....

You know why I call it "central heating"??

Because the woodstove is in the middle of the living room....

No central heat.

One bathroom.

Most of the house barely has electrical service.

Several walls have no insulation.

The "foundation" under the northern part is way under code -- just fieldstone with patched and repatched mortar.

OH yeah -- and plastic plumbing.

And leaky assed double hung windows that need constant maintenance to keep the wind out in the winter....

Did I mention termites???? (Dad said they were here when they moved in in 1936...)

When do I get to move in????


Big Grin

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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17-09-2015, 12:19 PM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
Paying more for something just because it's old is stupid IMHO. However, some old things can be beautiful. Paying for something you like because it's beautiful is not more stupid than paying for a vacation because it's enjoyable. And of course, if you are a dealer, you pay for antiques because you can sell them for more. I've been to antique stores and seldom have I seen anything I thought was beautiful, but then different people like different things.

The oldest things I own are things I bought new a long time ago. This computer is almost an antique.

"El mar se mide por olas,
el cielo por alas,
nosotros por lágrimas."
-- Jaime Sabines
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17-09-2015, 12:23 PM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
(17-09-2015 10:48 AM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 08:45 AM)Mr. Boston Wrote:  Coming from New England, the birthplace of "antiques" with some of the oldest crap in America kicking around I agree that the pricing can be ridiculous. Really hardcore antique buffs are some of the weirdest people you'd ever care to meet. But I also understand the attraction. Can we honestly say we expect the couches, beds, and dressers being cranked out today to stand up to 200+ years of daily use? Sure, I can get a super cheap particle-board bookcase, maybe even with some kind of warrantee, but do I even WANT a piece of furniture like that to last the rest of my life? When you buy an antique bookshelf or end table the "warrantee" is essentially the plain fact that it was built during the Taft administration and it's still standing. If it's already outlasted a few generations of human beings, I'm fairly sure my books aren't going to utterly screw it up.

There's some truth to the old "they don't make 'em like they used to" mantra. They don't. It would deleterious for modern businesses to produce goods that last 50 or 100 years. There's a lot more profit in making something that'll do the job for 5-10 years and then need to be replaced. Back in the day though, when everything was made by hand with natural materials, you attracted customers by producing the BEST rocking chair or end table; something people could buy and feel secure would never need to be replaced. It was expensive because someone spent 100s of hours skillfully making the object, you paid for the craftsmanship as much as the object itself. I can see the appeal in that. There's not much I side with hipsters about, but their focus on artisanal, bespoke objects does make sense to me, it's a way to make economies more local again and hopefully produce a higher quality of goods. Maybe it's not so much that antique furniture is way too expensive as it is that modern furniture is way too cheap.

When my wife and I got married, my mother gave us a couple hundred bucks specifically to be used to purchase an antique rocking chair. She had a really old rocking chair when my brother and I were born and it meant a lot to her that we'd have something to rock our future babies in, something that would stand up to time. So we found a really cool looking chair from around 1905. It's our only antique "piece" but it's outlasted ALL the more affordable IKEA modular-construction crapola we furnished our first apartment with, and the odds are good our great-grandchildren will one day rock their kids to sleep in it. I don't think there are a lot of consumer goods being made these days that can live up to that kind of expectation.

That said, the obvious downside is most families I know of have tons of old stuff hanging around from some long-deceased great great aunt they never even met. So maybe longevity is a curse too, lol.

My kitchen table and chairs are over 100 years old now.

Purchased by husband's great great grandmother, passed to his great mother, who passed it onto her son when he got married. That table has been used constantly. It was the pasta table, the wine making table...until we got it and have used it for just about every single meal for the last 15 years!

When we got married we got a table set 8 piece (1 table, one 1 leaf, 6 chairs)...it didn't last 10 years...and the first 5 were before kids and honestly, we hardly used it.

The faux top started peeling...the chairs wobbled and eventually started to just fall apart. You know it's bad when a toddler (who wieghed barely 20lbs soaking wet) sits on a chair and it cracks. By the time we got rid of it, we only three chairs.

Yet this old table, with four original chairs has outlasted just about everything! Countless spills, endless homework struggles....The gears to put in the leafs still work even, which is kinda amazing.

So yeah, I'll take the old set over the new crap today.

We have the new crap today because it's possible to cheaply manufacture. Back when your table was made, they didn't have plastics and fiberboard or formica. They all had to be made of solid wood.

As well, you can still find well made furniture created by people who still take 100 hours to build one table, they're just expensive. The primary difference is that all tables had to be made by a craftsman 100 years ago, so they would all be rather expensive. Now, you don't have to save up or spend an obscene amount of money to get a table. You can just go buy a cheapo one, and then buy another cheapo one in a few decades. Your kids can buy their own cheapo one after that.

There is something to be said for heirlooms like that, though. If the item has already been purchased many many years ago and is in good condition, then there's little additional cost to maintaining it and it makes good sense. I have a desk that is a family heirloom and I'll give it to my nephew when he gets older.

Excuse me, I'm making perfect sense. You're just not keeping up.

"Let me give you some advice, bastard: never forget what you are. The rest of the world will not. Wear it like armor, and it can never be used to hurt you." - Tyrion Lannister
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17-09-2015, 12:27 PM
RE: Antique - isn't that Latin for "you paid too much"?
(17-09-2015 12:09 PM)onlinebiker Wrote:  LOL....

SOLD....

You know why I call it "central heating"??

Because the woodstove is in the middle of the living room....

No central heat.

One bathroom.

Most of the house barely has electrical service.

Several walls have no insulation.

The "foundation" under the northern part is way under code -- just fieldstone with patched and repatched mortar.

OH yeah -- and plastic plumbing.

And leaky assed double hung windows that need constant maintenance to keep the wind out in the winter....

Did I mention termites???? (Dad said they were here when they moved in in 1936...)

When do I get to move in????


Big Grin

Not unlike the house I grew up in (built by my stepfather's great grandfather) Tongue When adding a room at one point, we found late 1800s newspapers used as insulation in some of the walls. Cast iron stove in the living room (though not in the middle). As a kid, one of my daily chores was to chop firewood, if necessary, and have a fire going by the time my stepfather got home. Another chore was to use the machete to fight a constant battle against the blackberry bushes that were always trying to envelop the woodshed lol. The house was an antique, and not a pretty one. It was comfortable enough, though, and the island property it was on would probably be worth a couple million at this point if a bunch of hippie activists hadn't managed to get it labeled as a historic property, thereby making it illegal for us to build new structures on our own property, essentially making it unsellable. His family claimed it back when all you had to do was get there and say it was yours and then wait for your title to be issued.

'Murican Canadian
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