Any marathon runners?
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27-12-2016, 09:08 PM
Any marathon runners?
So, ive decided that I would like to complete a half marathon (13.1 miles/21 km) on the 6th June 2017. In my old job I did a lot of running and I miss the feeling it gives. I also need to get more exercise as I now have a desk job and want to keep my blood pressure down.

Ive done a bit of research into it and touched upon some of the main topics, I still have a lot to learn though.

So if there are any runners, id love to hear as much info that you can give on:

Training regimes - I've heard some people say that you should follow training regimes and I have heard a few people say not to follow them strictly, but to go with the flow of your body.

Ive treated myself to an annual gym membership so I will be doing most of my training there, although I will also be doing running around where I live.

Nutrition - Ive done a lot of reading on different training diets and also different nutrition on the day of the run (loading carbs two days before, different gels on race day to keep away from the wall and timing etc)

Your stories - What have you done, how did you find it? How did you keep yourself motivated?

And anything else really Bowing

I feel so much, and yet I feel nothing.
I am a rock, I am the sky, the birds and the trees and everything beyond.
I am the wind, in the fields in which I roar. I am the water, in which I drown.
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28-12-2016, 02:40 AM
RE: Any marathon runners?
(27-12-2016 09:08 PM)bemore Wrote:  Training regimes -
I think, best to start off slowly, let your body get used to the exercise. slowly increase length and intensity, avoid injuries, don't take longer than 5 days off as your fitness will go backwards. Include hills in your run.

(27-12-2016 09:08 PM)bemore Wrote:  Ive treated myself to an annual gym membership
I don't see how gym helps, best to get roadwork done.

(27-12-2016 09:08 PM)bemore Wrote:  Nutrition -
I think just a well balanced diet is fine.

(27-12-2016 09:08 PM)bemore Wrote:  Your stories - What have you done, how did you find it? How did you keep yourself motivated?
I keep a spreadsheet so I can track my improvements, I generally get better every week, because I keep trying to better myself. That's how I get motivated, I focus on doing even better next time.

My best time is 1 hr 35 minutes, I was training about 3-4 times a week. 1 long run 15-18 kms, 1 easy run 12 kms and 1 run with running up a hill, walking down, running up again a few times. + another run if I could fit a fourth in.

I don't actually like running though. I don't get a buz out of it, I find it quite boring. But it is great way to get fit.
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28-12-2016, 02:58 AM
RE: Any marathon runners?
Hang on, does this thread include reading the posts by guys like Tomasia and Pop's?

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
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28-12-2016, 03:46 AM
RE: Any marathon runners?
(28-12-2016 02:40 AM)Stevil Wrote:  I don't see how gym helps, best to get roadwork done.

I've chosen to join the gym to do running, plus I will also do strength training once a week to build core and joint strength. The gym will also be more convenient and time effective for me. I will get plenty of roadwork done though.

(28-12-2016 02:40 AM)Stevil Wrote:  I think just a well balanced diet is fine.

Did you not focus on carbohydrate and protein? Did you do any loading before the race? What did you use during your races?

(28-12-2016 02:40 AM)Stevil Wrote:  I keep a spreadsheet so I can track my improvements, I generally get better every week, because I keep trying to better myself. That's how I get motivated, I focus on doing even better next time.

My best time is 1 hr 35 minutes, I was training about 3-4 times a week. 1 long run 15-18 kms, 1 easy run 12 kms and 1 run with running up a hill, walking down, running up again a few times. + another run if I could fit a fourth in.

I don't actually like running though. I don't get a buz out of it, I find it quite boring. But it is great way to get fit.

Wow, that is a really good time. I'd be very happy with that time, although for my first time my goal is to just finish.

I feel so much, and yet I feel nothing.
I am a rock, I am the sky, the birds and the trees and everything beyond.
I am the wind, in the fields in which I roar. I am the water, in which I drown.
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28-12-2016, 05:29 AM
RE: Any marathon runners?
For a half marathon, you honestly don't need to eat anything during the race. It may be worth eating some *small* thing beforehand, but make sure it's at least 30-45 minutes before, so you've got time to digest it. Also don't eat weird stuff like goos if you haven't tried them before. Shortest route to messing up your race.

I generally don't drink at all before the halfway mark, but again that's personal. I certainly wouldn't advise drinking in the first 5 km, and when you do drink don't drink a lot. You can easily over-drink and spend most of the race sloshing with too much liquid.

In terms of training, just eat a healthy balanced diet and don't obsess over details. Make sure you run at least 3 times a week - less than that your body doesn't really adapt. Depending on how soon you want to run the thing don't push your body too hard in training. The general rule is only increase 10% per week. So if you're running 5 miles each time for week 1, run maximum of 5.5 miles each time for week 2. Consistency is key in training. Just making sure you're getting out on the road regularly is of more benefit than doing high mileage. Also since this is your first I'd advise don't push the pace in training.

You don't need to taper or anything fancy either - tapering is for longer distances.

In terms of race strategy make sure that you go out at a reasonable pace. It's ironic that I say this 'cos I'm the guy who always charges off at high speed, full of the joys of spring. But you'll run a faster race overall if you start at a more relaxed pace. Be aware that the first 2-3 km you'll be excited and the pace will feel slow. If you manage to keep focused you'll have the huge payoff of not running out of power in the second half of the race. Basically running too fast in the early stages guarantees you a rough time in the later part of the race.

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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28-12-2016, 11:51 AM
RE: Any marathon runners?
(28-12-2016 05:29 AM)morondog Wrote:  For a half marathon, you honestly don't need to eat anything during the race. It may be worth eating some *small* thing beforehand, but make sure it's at least 30-45 minutes before, so you've got time to digest it. Also don't eat weird stuff like goos if you haven't tried them before. Shortest route to messing up your race.

I generally don't drink at all before the halfway mark, but again that's personal. I certainly wouldn't advise drinking in the first 5 km, and when you do drink don't drink a lot. You can easily over-drink and spend most of the race sloshing with too much liquid.

In terms of training, just eat a healthy balanced diet and don't obsess over details. Make sure you run at least 3 times a week - less than that your body doesn't really adapt. Depending on how soon you want to run the thing don't push your body too hard in training. The general rule is only increase 10% per week. So if you're running 5 miles each time for week 1, run maximum of 5.5 miles each time for week 2. Consistency is key in training. Just making sure you're getting out on the road regularly is of more benefit than doing high mileage. Also since this is your first I'd advise don't push the pace in training.

You don't need to taper or anything fancy either - tapering is for longer distances.

In terms of race strategy make sure that you go out at a reasonable pace. It's ironic that I say this 'cos I'm the guy who always charges off at high speed, full of the joys of spring. But you'll run a faster race overall if you start at a more relaxed pace. Be aware that the first 2-3 km you'll be excited and the pace will feel slow. If you manage to keep focused you'll have the huge payoff of not running out of power in the second half of the race. Basically running too fast in the early stages guarantees you a rough time in the later part of the race.

What would you reccomend for the final 2-3 weeks before the big day? You said not to taper, which I can appreciate. Should I stick to the same, progressive training all the way up to the end, or should I ease off a little to make sure im free from injury and 100% ready? Maybe do some classes like spin or pilates or something in the final week?

Because ive not really ran for nearly two years, Ive been recommended to start on the treadmill for the first week as its cushioned and will ease my joints into it. I imagine roadwork is important as compared to the treadmill, it does not give any forward momentum running on the road, whereas the treadmill does.

Ive also read that I should replace my running shoes every 350 miles. So would it be a good idea to buy two identical pairs of running shoes and alternate them between sessions? Or should I wait until a few weeks before and get a new pair and give them time to bed in?

Any recommendations on what I should look for when choosing my running shoes and any recommendations on which type/brand I should go for?

Cheers.

I feel so much, and yet I feel nothing.
I am a rock, I am the sky, the birds and the trees and everything beyond.
I am the wind, in the fields in which I roar. I am the water, in which I drown.
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28-12-2016, 11:54 AM
RE: Any marathon runners?
(27-12-2016 09:08 PM)bemore Wrote:  And anything else really Bowing

Don't do it. It's not good for you. If you must do it, walk casually carrying a shillelagh while whistling.

#sigh
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28-12-2016, 11:59 AM
RE: Any marathon runners?
Congrats on your decision to take on a half marathon. Since you have a date, I assume you signed up. That's a great step right there for staying motivated.

First, and very important, you need to go to your local running store and get fitted for running shoes. One of the surest ways to get injured is by wearing non-running shoes or even the wrong running shoes. What's "right" is different for everyone, so let your local running store clerk help you find the right running shoes for you.

Training (I'm assuming you're starting with little running fitness at this point):
I recommend spending a couple of months just building a running base. By that, I mean just work up to being reasonably comfortable running 2-3 miles 3 or 4 times per week. Don't worry about running pace. Just complete the mileage. Most half marathon training plans are somewhere around 12 weeks so you have plenty of time to build the base before you would need to start a plan.

It's also important to alternate rest/recovery with harder/longer runs. You can find training plans on the internet that will help with this, but you can alternate in several ways. Days running vs. days not running, longer mileage vs. shorter mileage, faster pace vs. slower pace. As a beginner it is usually good to run no more than every other day. Do run at least 3 times per week. (When you become more experienced, this can be changed and you might eventually run, for example, Sun, Tues, Wed, Thurs, Sat and not on Mon or Fri.)

It's also important to balance listening to your body with not making excuses. In other words, if you're feeling overtired, then run a short, slow run for that day. Or take the day off completely if you need that. But remember, you will feel tired on some days. That's normal and you don't want it to become an excuse to take too many days off. The key is running breaks down your muscle fibers and then the muscles heal stronger. So you don't want to break them down too far. That's why rest and recovery are vitally important to give your muscles a chance to heal and build. Finally, any abnormal pain should be taken seriously. Cutting back if you feel an injury coming on may save your race while pushing through might guarantee you can't participate. It's not always so easy to tell the difference between normal training pains and injury pains. Just be cautious. If the pain lasts too many days, I'd be concerned.

I also agree that you need road mileage. Treadmills are completely different than running on the road. They're ok here and there when weather is bad, but I'd say at least 80% of your mileage should be on the road. More is better.

Nutrition:
I agree with morondog, just eat a balanced diet which should contain carbohydrates and protein anyway. In addition, I recommend, within 30 minutes after finishing your runs, drink a recovery drink. Chocolate milk is great for this, but sports drinks will do too or protein shakes if you prefer those. Research has shown that your muscles will absorb more during the first 30 minutes after exercise which is the reason for the time-frame.

You may not need to eat anything the day of the race if it's first thing in the morning, but if you do, eat light and eat at least an hour before the race if it's anything substantial. 30 minutes may be okay if it's light. You should practice what and when to eat during your training so you'll know what sits in your stomach okay beforehand. DON'T eat ANYTHING on race day that you haven't tried before in training.

Also, carboloading should really be done throughout your training as a portion of your normal, balanced diet. Carboloading the night before your race may just leave your stomach feeling full and heavy on race day. It's okay to eat something like pasta the night before in order to boost the carbs, but just enough to be satisfied, not stuffed.

Other
Most of my experience lately is with marathons ("lately", because I also ran 2 mile, 5k, and 10k races quite a bit when I was a lot younger). I have run only 1 half marathon. I agree with morondog that you won't need to eat anything in the half marathon. You will need to hydrate, but not in the first third and only minimally after that.

I have used a marathon training plan by Hal Higdon and liked it well enough. I never used a half marathon training plan, but his is probably fine for that too. Unfortunately, another plan I used for marathons doesn't have a half marathon version. But you can also just gradually increase your mileage using the 10% rule that morondog mentioned and the principal of alternating hard/easy workouts with rest in between.

I also really like the Marathon Training Academy podcast. The hosts are a married couple and they're just average runners with a lot of good information, especially for beginners. While their main focus is on marathons, much of their information applies to half marathons too. They're interpersonal dynamic is great and keeps it entertaining IMHO.

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28-12-2016, 12:10 PM
RE: Any marathon runners?
(28-12-2016 11:51 AM)bemore Wrote:  What would you reccomend for the final 2-3 weeks before the big day? You said not to taper, which I can appreciate. Should I stick to the same, progressive training all the way up to the end, or should I ease off a little to make sure im free from injury and 100% ready? Maybe do some classes like spin or pilates or something in the final week?
I would keep progressing up to the final week and then run some easier runs the week of the race, a very short run 2 days before, and nothing at all the day before. I've heard cross training can be good throughout, but I'm not the best to give advice on that because I generally don't do it other than some core muscle workouts.

(28-12-2016 11:51 AM)bemore Wrote:  Because ive not really ran for nearly two years, Ive been recommended to start on the treadmill for the first week as its cushioned and will ease my joints into it. I imagine roadwork is important as compared to the treadmill, it does not give any forward momentum running on the road, whereas the treadmill does.
Spot on.

(28-12-2016 11:51 AM)bemore Wrote:  Ive also read that I should replace my running shoes every 350 miles. So would it be a good idea to buy two identical pairs of running shoes and alternate them between sessions? Or should I wait until a few weeks before and get a new pair and give them time to bed in?
I replace mine about every 400-450 miles. Alternating 2 pairs is good although I don't do it myself. I've heard that gives the cushioning more time to rebound between runs. At the very least, it can help when one pair gets wet in the rain. Definitely, don't race in anything that hasn't been broken in.

(28-12-2016 11:51 AM)bemore Wrote:  Any recommendations on what I should look for when choosing my running shoes and any recommendations on which type/brand I should go for?
Everyone has different gaits, weight, foot strikes, pronation levels, etc. It's best to seek the advice at a running store. Have them do a gait analysis if they do that.

@DonaldTrump, Patriotism is not honoring your flag no matter what your country/leader does. It's doing whatever it takes to make your country the best it can be as long as its not violent.
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28-12-2016, 03:52 PM
RE: Any marathon runners?
(28-12-2016 11:51 AM)bemore Wrote:  What would you reccomend for the final 2-3 weeks before the big day? You said not to taper, which I can appreciate. Should I stick to the same, progressive training all the way up to the end, or should I ease off a little to make sure im free from injury and 100% ready? Maybe do some classes like spin or pilates or something in the final week?
Hmm. That's a tough one. I'd stick to normal training until a week before or so, then ease off just a tiny bit. Definitely no long run for the last 3 days beforehand, and I'd advise don't change eating habits either. Carbo-loading sounds good in theory, but ja, in my experience messing with your food is the number one way to fuck up your race. What happens if you wake up on race day and try to take a dump and nothing comes out, meantime you loaded up last night? Fucking midway emergency, that's what Weeping

Quote:Because ive not really ran for nearly two years, Ive been recommended to start on the treadmill for the first week as its cushioned and will ease my joints into it. I imagine roadwork is important as compared to the treadmill, it does not give any forward momentum running on the road, whereas the treadmill does.
Oh boy... injuries... Bro, you're gonna have to feel your way here. I'd definitely use the treadmill to ease in. Injuries are difficult because there's a difficult mental thing of "is this thing flaring up? Am I gonna aggravate it? Am I just being a pansy?" Basically I'd keep a close eye on what your knees are doing, accept some pain within reason if they do start acting up, and ease off if the pain becomes such that you don't look forward to going for your run. It's a very delicate thing to deal with and everyone has to work that stuff out for themselves. Experience is the guide, and unfortunately the only way to get experience is to have to work your way through a couple of injuries and the recovery process. Good idea to stick a bag of peas in your freezer and use it to ice anywhere that feels dodgy straight after the run. Don't ice for longer than 10 minutes at a time or you'll start killing tissue Smile

Quote:Ive also read that I should replace my running shoes every 350 miles. So would it be a good idea to buy two identical pairs of running shoes and alternate them between sessions? Or should I wait until a few weeks before and get a new pair and give them time to bed in?
I've done the alternating thing once in my life. It was quite nice and it does mean that you have two nicely worn in pairs of shoes for any occasion. Otherwise yeah, you'll need to replace them probably when they get to that mileage or a bit more, like Impulse said. Do make sure if you need to replace them before the race that you do get them with a couple of weeks at least to wear in, running in new shoes on race day is something everyone should try at least once, just so they know never to do it again Tongue But don't feel that you have to replace them before race day - if they've still got miles in them it's nicer to run in the pair you're comfortable with.

Quote:Any recommendations on what I should look for when choosing my running shoes and any recommendations on which type/brand I should go for?
That's a very personal thing. Depends on all kinds of things. Height, running style, weight... really you need to go to a good running store and get them to help you choose.

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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