Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
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30-12-2013, 07:11 PM
Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
I grew up in a fundamentalist church. Our particular brand was Plymouth Brethren. They were anti-science, ant-evolution, and women had well defined roles... namely, they didn't wear men's clothes, didn't speak during church services, wore head-coverings during church services, and were reminded they were subservient to men. I could go on and on.

Anyway, my dad is in computer repair, watches a lot of TLC, the History channel and Discover. I asked my dad recently about the age of the universe recently, and he told me he believes it's only about 12,000 years old.

Anyone else have fundamentalist, young earth creationist parents?
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30-12-2013, 07:28 PM
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
I used to have a step dad who likely is, but I never talked about it when my mom was married to him. For that matter, I was Christian at the time and didn't really know much about what I believed.

I'm guessing he was YEC because he was quite anti-science (at least in so much as it contradicts the Bible). We were talking about taxonomy for whatever reason, and I made mention that humans are animals (as opposed to plants, fungus, monera, and protists), and he freaked out. He was also a huge adherent of the idea that the man is the head of the household.

He would also be kind of weird about church attendance. For whatever reason, my mom would often stay home, and so would my younger brother (his son), but I had to go if my step dad went. One day, none of us made it, but he made me watch an hour long televangelist program, and told me he'd quiz me on it. He didn't actually watch the show, so it was pretty easy to make up whatever I wanted about the sermon.

They got divorced when I was fifteen, so I never really talked religion to him.
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30-12-2013, 07:59 PM (This post was last modified: 30-12-2013 08:23 PM by anonymous66.)
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
It didn't take me long to realize that most of their claims were just weird interpretations that were not mainstream, by any means. I started looking around at other churches when I was still in my teens, and I had no problems questioning the fundamentalist doctrine and interpretations. But, I still believed in God and searched for him until I was in my mid-40's.

I wasn't sure what to believe about evolution for many years, but I leaned towards evolution even in high-school... the evidence always appeared to be too conclusive. I looked into the evidence for evolution, and read books comparing evolution to creationism. Evolution is clearly a valid theory- it might as well be called the law of evolution. I now enjoy debating creationists and ID proponents.

I still can't get over the fact that I have family that holds such odd beliefs. Their beliefs do look very bizarre from the outside.
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30-12-2013, 10:17 PM
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
Anonymous66,
Come to my arms! You are the first ex-Plymouth Brethren atheist that I have met since I left the Brethren 4 years ago. I too come from a YEC family who hold to a 6000 year old earth and I too find it odd that my family, replete with professionals who hold high degrees and who do well in their secular lives, holds to such an indefensible position.

If I may ask, why did you become an atheist?

Please do keep in touch. I am thrilled to meet an ex-PB!

Welcome aboard!

Doc
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31-12-2013, 08:30 AM (This post was last modified: 31-12-2013 01:18 PM by anonymous66.)
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
Hey Doc. Good to meet you! I haven't met many Plymouth Brethren folks, either. An odd exception is right here where I live now.... I'm 3,000 miles away from where I grew up, and I met another former Plymouth Brethren in the small town where I now live. He's also far away from his former church. The fellow in questions does consider himself to be a Christian, but is of a liberal, mainstream variety, and does not evangelize at all, to my knowledge. It's been interesting to talk with him from time to time about growing up PB.

But, you are the first atheist, former Plymouth Brethren I've communicated with.

My road to disbelief has been a long one. I got "saved" when I was about 6. I attended our PB church until I went away to a private Christian college after high school. For the longest time (about 40 years), I thought our church was just messed up, but I still believed God existed.

I really enjoyed Bible study on my own and in groups. I tried to listen to God and understand what He was trying to say to me. I read a lot of Philip Yancey, C.S. Lewis, Max Lucado, Billy Graham, and many other Christian authors. I think Philip Yancey actually may have started me along the road to atheism. I started reading authors he suggested, also, and started reading G.K. Chesteron, Frederick Buechner and Annie Dillard.

I also engaged in what might be called "spiritual tourism". Starting during college, I attended churches of various denominations. I was a regular attender of an Independent Baptist church, then another mainstream Baptist church, I attended a Wesleyan church for a number of years and met my wife there. She grew up in the Church of God denomination (of Anderson, Indiana- no speaking in tongues or snake handling, lol), and we got married there and attended her church for many years. Then we started attending a local Catholic church, and eventually converted.... That was about 10 years ago. My wife is still a Christian, and I've come out to her as an atheist (well, first as an agnostic), but she doesn't attend church on a regular basis, either, and when she does, so goes to the Church of God. I consider the Church of God to be of the mainstream variety, with nothing really weird going on, except that they believe there is a deity behind the writing of the Bible. Even when we were first married, we made decisions rationally, we were never really the type to look for "signs".

So, anyway, after attending all these churches and reading as much as I have, I gradually came to the conclusion that there is no way to pick between all these denominations, or objectively decide who is more "right". I've also been aware of the 3 Abrahamic religions since childhood, and have come to the conclusion there is no way to pick between these, either. The most likely explanation was that there is no God, and that all religions are merely man-made. In the last few months, I've been reading and listening to Richard Carrier, Bart Ehrman, and Robert Price, and also listening to The Atheist Experience. The evidence is in. Anyone who studies the history of religions is bound to come to the conclusion that religions are man-made. There is nothing in any world religion that would suggest some all-knowing deity is communicating with people, but rather all the evidence suggests that religions were created by people with no better morals, and no more knowledge about the world, as anyone else living during the time period they were written.

I suppose there could be some deity responsible for the creation of the universe in the beginning, and there is no way to disprove the idea, but the only reason the idea exists in the first place is because humans have a history of ascribing agency to natural phenomenon. Deities are becoming extinct at an alarming rate. Humans have a history of believing that deities are responsible for things we don't understand, but we keep finding out that there is no reason to believe this. It's more likely that the universe was created by natural processed we just don't understand.

How about you, Doc? What's your story? Was yours a closed group? Our church required a letter from another church bearing witness to the fact that you were a member in good standing. Or if you didn't have church, you would be interviewed before being allowed to partake in the Lord's Supper.
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31-12-2013, 08:34 AM
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
My father is an anglican and my mother is catholic. My father fucking hates catholics like if there was nothing worse on the world and my mother believes that protestants are generaly cold and heartless people.

This resulted in them arguing over which faith I should be raised with. They didnt chose any, and thought it would be wise I chose myself when old enought.

I didn`t chose at all.

[Image: RPYH95t.png]
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31-12-2013, 11:25 AM
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
(31-12-2013 08:30 AM)anonymous66 Wrote:  but the only reason the idea exists in the first place is because humans have a history of ascribing agency to natural phenomenon. Deities are becoming extinct at an alarming rate. Humans have a history of believing that deities are responsible for things we don't understand, but we keep finding out that there is no reason to believe this. It's more likely that the universe was created by natural processed we just don't understand.

*applause* perfectly put.

1) An un evidenced, unverifiable God possesses certain presupposed attributes as found in religious propaganda, folklore and literature.

2) It is impossible for any presupposed un evidenced entity to attain any verifiable attributes without the intervention of a creative entity.

3) Overwhelming evidence indicates that humans create and compose propaganda, folklore and literature having to do with all gods.

Therefore a creative entity superior to all presupposed gods exists, and that entity is man. Smartass

May I suggest you get a copy of "Manual for creating atheists" by peter boghossian (it was recommended here via a pod cast I heard a couple months ago), it was like $11 on amazon, I got it, and love it. Simple read, easy to understand and is a great book to use in debates.

Also christopher hitchens work is solid.

I went from christian southern baptist, to spiritual to agnostic to atheist, the more I read and thought and researched, the less I believed. Welcome to the club.
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31-12-2013, 11:52 AM
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
Thank you. I'll look into Peter Boghossian. I've listened to several of Christopher Hitchens' debates, but he is sometimes just too anti-theist for my taste. But, to each his own.

My current favorite atheists are Robert Price, Jerry DeWitt and Dan Barker.
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31-12-2013, 01:11 PM (This post was last modified: 31-12-2013 01:16 PM by docskeptic.)
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
Anonymous66,
My story is similar to yours. I was a fourth generation Plymouth Brethren. My life revolved around the church. For some reason, I never fully cottoned on to the faith, although I tried my darnedest for about 40 years. Something inoculated me against the virus (as I like to call it) or meme, if you prefer. I always gravitated towards science, finding it more beautiful and satisfying than religion. A scientist exploring new explanations for a problem was, I thought, more brave and bold than a cowardly and timid elder, priest, mullah, or whatever relying on an invisible God as the end-all and be-all of solutions.

Like you, I read all that I could about my faith and then gradually what lay beyond it. I am grateful to the Brethren for instilling in me a love for Bible study, which remains my choice of literature (other than Elizabethan and Victorian literature.) It was through intensive Bible study that I came across multiple discrepancies or errors in the Bible that could only be explained by the human origin of the text.

Like you, I am familiar with the feeling of being on the outside, looking in and wondering at the beliefs of my ex-co-religionists and being amazed at myself for once believing in the same things.

My family remains intensely religious and this leads to some interesting encounters which usually end by them declaring me insane or demon-possessed. In the end though, they remain loving and cordial and I am grateful for that.

I run a "Sunday School" in the forum which you are welcome to "attend" and participate in.

BTW, shouldn't your name be anonymous666?

Doc
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31-12-2013, 03:15 PM (This post was last modified: 31-12-2013 03:37 PM by anonymous66.)
RE: Anyone Else with Fundamentalist YEC Parents?
(31-12-2013 01:11 PM)docskeptic Wrote:  Anonymous66,
My story is similar to yours. I was a fourth generation Plymouth Brethren. My life revolved around the church. For some reason, I never fully cottoned on to the faith, although I tried my darnedest for about 40 years. Something inoculated me against the virus (as I like to call it) or meme, if you prefer. I always gravitated towards science, finding it more beautiful and satisfying than religion. A scientist exploring new explanations for a problem was, I thought, more brave and bold than a cowardly and timid elder, priest, mullah, or whatever relying on an invisible God as the end-all and be-all of solutions.

Like you, I read all that I could about my faith and then gradually what lay beyond it. I am grateful to the Brethren for instilling in me a love for Bible study, which remains my choice of literature (other than Elizabethan and Victorian literature.) It was through intensive Bible study that I came across multiple discrepancies or errors in the Bible that could only be explained by the human origin of the text.

Like you, I am familiar with the feeling of being on the outside, looking in and wondering at the beliefs of my ex-co-religionists and being amazed at myself for once believing in the same things.

My family remains intensely religious and this leads to some interesting encounters which usually end by them declaring me insane or demon-possessed. In the end though, they remain loving and cordial and I am grateful for that.

I run a "Sunday School" in the forum which you are welcome to "attend" and participate in.

BTW, shouldn't your name be anonymous666?

Doc
Thanks Doc,
Was your church "exclusive" or "open"? We were definitely an exclusive group.

My upbringing instilled in me an interest in denominations, religions, and their history.

Another thing that led me down the road to skepticism is that apologists left me unimpressed. I remember listening to and reading Josh McDowell, specifically. There was just something about his arguments that didn't jive with me. I think it was obvious his claims are mere assertions, rather than an honest look at the historical accuracy of the Bible. the same goes for Lee Strobel.

I just read the last couple of posts in your Sunday School, thanks. I'll keep an eye on that thread.

My dad grew up in an alcoholic household, and struggles with alcoholism himself. I suspect he holds his beliefs tightly because for him, it's either believe what he was taught to believe in the Plymouth Brethren church, or go back to living a "sinful" life. It's all-or-nothing, black and white. He cannot look at his beliefs objectively. I don't talk about religion much with my family, it's not worth the drama. I prefer the anonymity of online forums.

In regards to the "66", he he. It's just my birthyear.
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