Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
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19-06-2014, 05:49 PM
Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
Atlantis scholars here by chance?

I've read a few books about the myth now and i find the whole thing fascinating Smile

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19-06-2014, 06:18 PM
RE: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
(19-06-2014 05:49 PM)barcelonic Wrote:  Atlantis scholars here by chance?

I've read a few books about the myth now and i find the whole thing fascinating Smile

How about a reference to the book you liked the most ?

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19-06-2014, 06:25 PM
RE: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
Well that'd easily be Plato's Critias - the only remotely credible work on the subject (lol)

But how about this one.. http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Ro...edir_esc=y

I do'nt have much faith in its author as altogether credible to be honest but neither did I have faith in the author of 'An Antediluvian World' (Ignatius Donnelly) but that's likely because serious scholars tend not to go near this subject.

Still, if you can pick apart wishful thinking from sensical reasoning then I'd say all 3 books are well worth a look!

Critias is only short too so it's easy to pick up for cheap and read in an hour. That's the one that got the whole thing started, although sadly it was never actually completed because he died Sad

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19-06-2014, 06:57 PM
RE: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
(19-06-2014 06:25 PM)barcelonic Wrote:  Well that'd easily be Plato's Critias - the only remotely credible work on the subject (lol)

But how about this one.. http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Ro...edir_esc=y

I do'nt have much faith in its author as altogether credible to be honest but neither did I have faith in the author of 'An Antediluvian World' (Ignatius Donnelly) but that's likely because serious scholars tend not to go near this subject.

Still, if you can pick apart wishful thinking from sensical reasoning then I'd say all 3 books are well worth a look!

Critias is only short too so it's easy to pick up for cheap and read in an hour. That's the one that got the whole thing started, although sadly it was never actually completed because he died Sad

I'll read it, but it sounds like a "morality play". (Springs of water feeding Athens ... sounds a lot like the "Garden of Eden"). If it really happened, would there not be Greek records of the battle, (even if Atlantis could not be placed, for sure ?) Are there Greek records of this ?

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19-06-2014, 07:36 PM
RE: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
http://www.helike.org/

Quote:In 373 BC, a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami destroyed and submerged the ancient Greek city of Helike, on the southwest shore of the Gulf of Corinth. The sunken city gradually silted over until it disappeared without a trace. Ancient writers ascribed the disaster to the wrath of Poseidon, god of earthquakes and the sea.

In 373 BC the 53 year old Plato was living in nearby Athens. He later wrote Critias.

I wonder where he got his inspiration from?

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20-06-2014, 02:17 AM
RE: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
Is it a coincidence that Atlantis happened to have the exact political system that Plato considered to be the perfect one?

This is nothing more than a fictional story based on some real events. Plato was known to use fictional and mythical stories to make a point.
Should we take Prometheus or Er literally?

There were probably lots of stories about sinking islands and civilizations disappearing (see Minoan eruption of Thera) so Plato could easily have been inspired by that.

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20-06-2014, 03:52 AM
RE: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
Yes Atlantis is mentioned by other historical works but by whom and where I cannot tell you I'm sorry.

The books I've read are essentially more modern attempts to give credibility to existence of such a place.

The one thing I keep coming back to though is that the siege of Troy was considered a fiction (Homer's 'The Iliad') until very recently, when archeologists discovered the place itself which was believed to be purely mythical. The location is now known and Troy was in Dardinia in present-day Turkey.

It was found because a guy read the Iliad and used every clue he could find within and followed them. The book itself actually gave enough useful information for it to be dicscovered.

Also, much in the same way that stories like Robin Hood, the Deluge and the Garden of Eden were most likely based off some truth originally, Atlantis could be a long-lost recollection of a story handed down about a very real place, which likely was nowhere near as grand and utopian as Plato's account suggests.

For instance, many people believe that the Garden Of Eden may have its origins with the ancient city of Babylon and its Hanging Gardens.

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20-06-2014, 04:30 AM
RE: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
(20-06-2014 03:52 AM)barcelonic Wrote:  The one thing I keep coming back to though is that the siege of Troy was considered a fiction (Homer's 'The Iliad') until very recently, when archeologists discovered the place itself which was believed to be purely mythical. The location is now known and Troy was in Dardinia in present-day Turkey.

It was found because a guy read the Iliad and used every clue he could find within and followed them. The book itself actually gave enough useful information for it to be dicscovered.

Actually, the Trojan war was mentioned by various sources. Homer's Iliad only helped in locating the actual city. It's not actually "very recently". Homer has been known to have given many historical and geographical clues for years, maybe centuries now.

Plato is the only person who talked about Atlantis, and its existence is very improbable, since there is no single sign of it.

It's tempting to think otherwise, even I think it would be awesome if there actually was anything like Atlantis, but I doubt it's anything more than wishful thinking.

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20-06-2014, 07:15 AM
Re: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
In any real context Plato wrote about it won't exist. It by far seems unimaginable by the power and size descriptions he described. He might of believed it to be real but the sources of his info we're probably massively misinformed of the actual places specs.

I recall some archeology discoveries I read a few years ago finding some sunken former coastline city in Spain that had a circular port that seems similar to the port description of Plato.

Id be more interested in the legend of the Amazons, who we're probably warriors from the Steps if real.

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20-06-2014, 06:36 PM
RE: Anyone here interested in Plato's Atlantis?
(20-06-2014 03:52 AM)barcelonic Wrote:  Yes Atlantis is mentioned by other historical works but by whom and where I cannot tell you I'm sorry.

The books I've read are essentially more modern attempts to give credibility to existence of such a place.

The one thing I keep coming back to though is that the siege of Troy was considered a fiction (Homer's 'The Iliad') until very recently, when archeologists discovered the place itself which was believed to be purely mythical. The location is now known and Troy was in Dardinia in present-day Turkey.

It was found because a guy read the Iliad and used every clue he could find within and followed them. The book itself actually gave enough useful information for it to be dicscovered.

Also, much in the same way that stories like Robin Hood, the Deluge and the Garden of Eden were most likely based off some truth originally, Atlantis could be a long-lost recollection of a story handed down about a very real place, which likely was nowhere near as grand and utopian as Plato's account suggests.

For instance, many people believe that the Garden Of Eden may have its origins with the ancient city of Babylon and its Hanging Gardens.

Plato made it up out of whole cloth to make a point. There is no mention of it before Plato.

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