Ape strength
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21-07-2012, 04:39 PM
RE: Ape strength
Ghostexorsist. I love your posts.... But I have to ask...

Do you have an Ape/Monkey Fetish? Tongue

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22-07-2012, 11:48 AM
RE: Ape strength
(21-07-2012 04:39 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  Ghostexorsist. I love your posts.... But I have to ask...

Do you have an Ape/Monkey Fetish? Tongue

I was waiting for someone to ask me that. I’ve only recently developed my fascination with Chimpanzees. It is all tied to my search for info on the origins of morality. We’ve had numerous threads here on the subject. Several books I have read in the past helped me to understand that morality is ingrained in social animals like wolves and primates. I was able to post in said threads with confidence, but I felt that I needed more exposure to the subject just in case I got into a debate with someone who felt morals only spring from supernatural sources. The books on evolutionary psychology that I read mentioned lots of experiments in this area regarding apes and monkeys. This is when I decided that I needed to read up on primate behavior. I read a few books on the subject and found that apes, particularly Chimps, are very interesting beyond the implications for evolved morality.

Everyone knows that we share nearly 99% of our DNA with Chimps, but they know little else about them. Did you know that they are excellent problem solvers (they are very good at picking locks), use stone tools, and self-medicate? There is even a community in Senegal in western Africa that hunts with spears, lounges in water (which chimps normally don’t like), and cools off in caves. The neatest thing to me is that they have culture just like humans. Culture is defined as knowledge that is passed down from one generation to the next. Different chimp communities in western, central, and eastern equatorial Africa have different preferences for food, different ways of greeting each other through hand and body gestures, and differences in stone and wood technology. Regarding stone tool use, archeologists found a site with chimp stone tools dating back 4,300 years! This usage no doubt goes back 7 million years to the joint human-chimp ancestor. Therefore, chimps are perfect for studying what the lives of our ancient pre-human ancestors must have been like. This of course reflects on the types of behaviors and technologies that we have today.
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22-07-2012, 12:32 PM
RE: Ape strength
(22-07-2012 11:48 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(21-07-2012 04:39 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  Ghostexorsist. I love your posts.... But I have to ask...

Do you have an Ape/Monkey Fetish? Tongue

I was waiting for someone to ask me that. I’ve only recently developed my fascination with Chimpanzees. It is all tied to my search for info on the origins of morality. We’ve had numerous threads here on the subject. Several books I have read in the past helped me to understand that morality is ingrained in social animals like wolves and primates. I was able to post in said threads with confidence, but I felt that I needed more exposure to the subject just in case I got into a debate with someone who felt morals only spring from supernatural sources. The books on evolutionary psychology that I read mentioned lots of experiments in this area regarding apes and monkeys. This is when I decided that I needed to read up on primate behavior. I read a few books on the subject and found that apes, particularly Chimps, are very interesting beyond the implications for evolved morality.

Everyone knows that we share nearly 99% of our DNA with Chimps, but they know little else about them. Did you know that they are excellent problem solvers (they are very good at picking locks), use stone tools, and self-medicate? There is even a community in Senegal in western Africa that hunts with spears, lounges in water (which chimps normally don’t like), and cools off in caves. The neatest thing to me is that they have culture just like humans. Culture is defined as knowledge that is passed down from one generation to the next. Different chimp communities in western, central, and eastern equatorial Africa have different preferences for food, different ways of greeting each other through hand and body gestures, and differences in stone and wood technology. Regarding stone tool use, archeologists found a site with chimp stone tools dating back 4,300 years! This usage no doubt goes back 7 million years to the joint human-chimp ancestor. Therefore, chimps are perfect for studying what the lives of our ancient pre-human ancestors must have been like. This of course reflects on the types of behaviors and technologies that we have today.
They are nice posts, I was just trying to joke around. If ya could, reccommend me the best of the books you read on the subject.

I plan on going into evolutionary biology, and I am very very curious as to the chimpanzee, and other primates similarites to us.

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23-07-2012, 01:41 AM
RE: Ape strength
(22-07-2012 12:32 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  They are nice posts, I was just trying to joke around. If ya could, reccommend me the best of the books you read on the subject.

I plan on going into evolutionary biology, and I am very very curious as to the chimpanzee, and other primates similarites to us.

No worries. I've sent you a private message so as not to derail the thread.
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24-07-2012, 09:11 AM
RE: Ape strength
This is really cool and interestingBig Grin
Maybe I should get a monkey as pet so he will move all the heavy stuff for me Tongue
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13-06-2013, 09:41 PM
RE: Ape strength
I just happened upon this video that has some nice explanatory animation.



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04-07-2013, 05:56 AM
RE: Ape strength
Picked this existing thread to post this news about chimps. The NIH is ending research using these animals!

http://www.livescience.com/37849-retired...pid=529605

The NIH expects to send some of the retired chimps to a national chimpanzee sanctuary in Louisiana, called Chimp Haven, which currently houses 166 chimps. Although Chimp Haven doesn't currently have the capacity to house all of the new retirees, sanctuary officials are in the process of expanding the facility to eventually house up to 425 chimps, according to head veterinarian Raven Jackson.

A chance to be social

For many of these chimps, this is the first opportunity to socialize with wild-born chimps — interaction that helps retirees navigate the foreign landscape.

"A chimp born in a research center may [have] never climbed a tree before. They will learn to climb a tree," said Jackson. "At no point will they be forced to be inside. They can say, 'I want to sleep outside amongst the trees and the breeze.' They are given that free choice."

“I suppose our capacity for self-delusion is boundless."
― John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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04-07-2013, 09:00 AM
RE: Ape strength
(04-07-2013 05:56 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  Picked this existing thread to post this news about chimps. The NIH is ending research using these animals!

http://www.livescience.com/37849-retired...pid=529605

The NIH expects to send some of the retired chimps to a national chimpanzee sanctuary in Louisiana, called Chimp Haven, which currently houses 166 chimps. Although Chimp Haven doesn't currently have the capacity to house all of the new retirees, sanctuary officials are in the process of expanding the facility to eventually house up to 425 chimps, according to head veterinarian Raven Jackson.

A chance to be social

For many of these chimps, this is the first opportunity to socialize with wild-born chimps — interaction that helps retirees navigate the foreign landscape.

"A chimp born in a research center may [have] never climbed a tree before. They will learn to climb a tree," said Jackson. "At no point will they be forced to be inside. They can say, 'I want to sleep outside amongst the trees and the breeze.' They are given that free choice."

That's amazingly awesome. Chimpanzee emancipation, yo.

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04-07-2013, 10:12 AM
RE: Ape strength
(04-07-2013 05:56 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  Picked this existing thread to post this news about chimps. The NIH is ending research using these animals!

I started a thread sometime ago on primate news. I haven't updated it in a while, though.

http://www.thethinkingatheist.com/forum/...imate-news

That is good news. I've been following the story for a while. The book Next of Kin: My Conversations With Chimpanzees (1997) mentions the negative mental and physical effects that medical research can have on chimps. One example of the second category is self-mutilation. Those sections of the book were heart wrenching.
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04-07-2013, 04:44 PM
RE: Ape strength
(04-07-2013 10:12 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(04-07-2013 05:56 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  Picked this existing thread to post this news about chimps. The NIH is ending research using these animals!

I started a thread sometime ago on primate news. I haven't updated it in a while, though.

http://www.thethinkingatheist.com/forum/...imate-news

That is good news. I've been following the story for a while. The book Next of Kin: My Conversations With Chimpanzees (1997) mentions the negative mental and physical effects that medical research can have on chimps. One example of the second category is self-mutilation. Those sections of the book were heart wrenching.

I wasn't aware that chimps self mutilated Sadcryface

“I suppose our capacity for self-delusion is boundless."
― John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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