Ape strength
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29-03-2015, 10:38 PM
RE: Ape strength
This thread has become one giant argument about nothing.

Sad, I found it interesting in the beginning.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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30-03-2015, 04:45 AM
RE: Ape strength
(29-03-2015 06:29 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(27-03-2015 09:55 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/...s-science/


Here is the actual study.

http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/art...io.1001871

Let's get the thread back on track. I think this study has interesting implications for (non-human) ape strength. Ape brains have remained the same size for millions of years, so natural selection had no reason to tinker with their muscles.

It may be more to the point that weak muscles in non-human apes would be selected against, while human muscle strength has been less and less 'visible' to selection pressure over evolutionary time.

And it has very recently receded even more dramatically from importance to selection. The taming of animals to do work, the industrial revolution, and the technology revolution have pushed physical strength way down in importance to survival.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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30-03-2015, 07:54 AM (This post was last modified: 30-03-2015 08:04 AM by ghostexorcist.)
RE: Ape strength
(30-03-2015 04:45 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(29-03-2015 06:29 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  Let's get the thread back on track. I think this study has interesting implications for (non-human) ape strength. Ape brains have remained the same size for millions of years, so natural selection had no reason to tinker with their muscles.

It may be more to the point that weak muscles in non-human apes would be selected against, while human muscle strength has been less and less 'visible' to selection pressure over evolutionary time.

And it has very recently receded even more dramatically from importance to selection. The taming of animals to do work, the industrial revolution, and the technology revolution have pushed physical strength way down in importance to survival.

True. Being adapted to climbing trees would ensure they remained strong. Genetics suggest chimps have changed more than we have since our respective split from the last common ancestor 6 to 7 million years ago. The fossil record seems to support this as early hominins like Ardipithecus ramidus (4.4 MYA), for example, lacked the structural anatomy for knuckle-walking utilized by chimps and gorillas and were probably better adept at bipedal walking due to a more modern pelvis and a more robust heel.
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30-03-2015, 08:12 AM
RE: Ape strength
By the way, here is the 2009 paper that I referred to in my very first post. See the attachment below.


Attached File(s)
.pdf  The Strength of Great Apes and the Speed of Humans.pdf (Size: 303.58 KB / Downloads: 30)
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