Appliances You Can Live Without
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16-12-2016, 12:53 PM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
(15-12-2016 02:31 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  Good gawd people. How do you survive without a refrigerator? Some of you must not have kids.

Oh! That's what that big white box in the kitchen is for! Keeping kids in when they get stroppy?

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16-12-2016, 02:52 PM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
(16-12-2016 12:50 PM)Anjele Wrote:  
(16-12-2016 12:43 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  When I was a kid (most of you know this already) we lived in a cabin in the woods with no indoor bathroom. We had an outhouse. We were a family of 6 living in a two rooms and the winters were brutal. My poor mother had to scrub all the clothes and wash them in the sink then wring them out and hang them around the cabin to dry during the winter. When we kids had to take a bath (once a week, sometimes two) my mother had to boil a huge pots of water and pour them into a horse trough then mix it with cool water so it didn't scald us.

That poor woman. She never sat down. She never had time to read books or do the things she really wanted to do like paint and write poetry or simply just THINK. She finally put her foot down with my dad and his backwoods crap and demanded that we move out of that clap-trap cabin. She threatened to leave and let HIM wash the damned laundry by hand. He was a nice guy but sometimes clueless.

When we moved from the cabin in Tahoe to Northern California and lived in a regular house (sort of) with an indoor bathroom and a washing machine (it was an old piece of shit from the 1940"s) she never wanted to go back to a no appliance world. It was pure drudgery for her. I think people forget how much work women had to do without appliances. It really was true that "women's work was never done". It was simply endless.

I can remember taking baths in a tub (actually more of a bucket) at my maternal grandmother's house. Since two of my aunts and one uncle are very close to my age we were lined up and bathed in that tub in the kitchen...same thing heating the water and then cooling it so as not to parboil us. They had running water but you couldn't drink it as it was rain water caught in a cistern and plumbed into the house...sort of. That's how I know I am highly allergic to Typhoid shots as I was given one before a visit at age 2 and nearly died...always raises eyebrows with medical personnel when I list that as an allergy. Tongue

My other grandmother had a wringer washer in the cellar that I ended up with in my early 20s. There's nothing quite so fun as being up to your armpits in water and wet clothes in an unheated cellar in the middle of winter in Iowa. At least there was a functional water heater.

My great granny had a wringer washer, she gave to my granny. I used to use it once in a while, just for kicks. It still works.
It actually makes a lot more sense, you can control so much more about what it's doing, and how long it runs and how much water to put in bla bla bla.

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16-12-2016, 03:22 PM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
(16-12-2016 02:52 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  
(16-12-2016 12:50 PM)Anjele Wrote:  I can remember taking baths in a tub (actually more of a bucket) at my maternal grandmother's house. Since two of my aunts and one uncle are very close to my age we were lined up and bathed in that tub in the kitchen...same thing heating the water and then cooling it so as not to parboil us. They had running water but you couldn't drink it as it was rain water caught in a cistern and plumbed into the house...sort of. That's how I know I am highly allergic to Typhoid shots as I was given one before a visit at age 2 and nearly died...always raises eyebrows with medical personnel when I list that as an allergy. Tongue

My other grandmother had a wringer washer in the cellar that I ended up with in my early 20s. There's nothing quite so fun as being up to your armpits in water and wet clothes in an unheated cellar in the middle of winter in Iowa. At least there was a functional water heater.

My great granny had a wringer washer, she gave to my granny. I used to use it once in a while, just for kicks. It still works.
It actually makes a lot more sense, you can control so much more about what it's doing, and how long it runs and how much water to put in bla bla bla.

Many zippers, snaps, and buttons lost their lives thanks to those wringers. Confused

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF

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17-12-2016, 11:16 AM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
Deluxe Electric cheese straightener Smile
Iron
Dishwasher
Toaster
Blow dryer
Popcorn popper
Blender
Waffle iron
Esspresso machine
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17-12-2016, 11:30 AM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
You can mail all of your unwanted appliances to me Thumbsup

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17-12-2016, 01:28 PM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
(17-12-2016 11:30 AM)bemore Wrote:  You can mail all of your unwanted appliances to me Thumbsup

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17-12-2016, 01:37 PM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
Iron
Ironing board
Washing machine
Vacuum cleaner
Kitchen sink
. . .

I just hate housework!

Wanted:
Disposable one-time-use clothes, bedheets, cutlery, crockery . . .

Of course, they would all have to be recyclable, I'm not a total waster! Think of the energy saved washing and drying stuff.

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17-12-2016, 02:07 PM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
(16-12-2016 12:50 PM)Anjele Wrote:  
(16-12-2016 12:43 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  When I was a kid (most of you know this already) we lived in a cabin in the woods with no indoor bathroom. We had an outhouse. We were a family of 6 living in a two rooms and the winters were brutal. My poor mother had to scrub all the clothes and wash them in the sink then wring them out and hang them around the cabin to dry during the winter. When we kids had to take a bath (once a week, sometimes two) my mother had to boil a huge pots of water and pour them into a horse trough then mix it with cool water so it didn't scald us.

That poor woman. She never sat down. She never had time to read books or do the things she really wanted to do like paint and write poetry or simply just THINK. She finally put her foot down with my dad and his backwoods crap and demanded that we move out of that clap-trap cabin. She threatened to leave and let HIM wash the damned laundry by hand. He was a nice guy but sometimes clueless.

When we moved from the cabin in Tahoe to Northern California and lived in a regular house (sort of) with an indoor bathroom and a washing machine (it was an old piece of shit from the 1940"s) she never wanted to go back to a no appliance world. It was pure drudgery for her. I think people forget how much work women had to do without appliances. It really was true that "women's work was never done". It was simply endless.

I can remember taking baths in a tub (actually more of a bucket) at my maternal grandmother's house. Since two of my aunts and one uncle are very close to my age we were lined up and bathed in that tub in the kitchen...same thing heating the water and then cooling it so as not to parboil us. They had running water but you couldn't drink it as it was rain water caught in a cistern and plumbed into the house...sort of. That's how I know I am highly allergic to Typhoid shots as I was given one before a visit at age 2 and nearly died...always raises eyebrows with medical personnel when I list that as an allergy. Tongue

My other grandmother had a wringer washer in the cellar that I ended up with in my early 20s. There's nothing quite so fun as being up to your armpits in water and wet clothes in an unheated cellar in the middle of winter in Iowa. At least there was a functional water heater.

We are two generations, maybe even three generations removed from the world without any electrical appliances. It's the same world that didn't have childhood vaccinations and antibiotics. People forget how much work women had to do every day. It was mind numbing. I LOVE all my appliances. LOVE THEM!

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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17-12-2016, 03:15 PM (This post was last modified: 17-12-2016 03:53 PM by Gloucester.)
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
(17-12-2016 02:07 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  
(16-12-2016 12:50 PM)Anjele Wrote:  I can remember taking baths in a tub (actually more of a bucket) at my maternal grandmother's house. Since two of my aunts and one uncle are very close to my age we were lined up and bathed in that tub in the kitchen...same thing heating the water and then cooling it so as not to parboil us. They had running water but you couldn't drink it as it was rain water caught in a cistern and plumbed into the house...sort of. That's how I know I am highly allergic to Typhoid shots as I was given one before a visit at age 2 and nearly died...always raises eyebrows with medical personnel when I list that as an allergy. Tongue

My other grandmother had a wringer washer in the cellar that I ended up with in my early 20s. There's nothing quite so fun as being up to your armpits in water and wet clothes in an unheated cellar in the middle of winter in Iowa. At least there was a functional water heater.

We are two generations, maybe even three generations removed from the world without any electrical appliances. It's the same world that didn't have childhood vaccinations and antibiotics. People forget how much work women had to do every day. It was mind numbing. I LOVE all my appliances. LOVE THEM!

Yeah, Britain was slways a bit behind the US on electrical stuff.

But if a generation is 25 years it's probably 4 generations now. At 72 I renember, in the 40s-50s, that our only electrical items were a radio and the lights. Irons were heated on the gas cooker, volume hot water from a "copper" heated by a gas ring, filled and drawn off using a large enamelled jug. Our tub hung on a nail on the svullery wall.The main heating was the open fire in the living room - we opened the door to the stairs about half an hour before bedtime to let some warmth up to the bedrooms. There was a little parafin heater that stopped the scullery pipes freezing up in the winter. We had to drain the cistern of the outside toilet in freezing weather and take a bucket of water out to flush it each time!

The first electrical appliance we had was a Hoover cylinder vacuum cleaner, open coal/wood fires were dirty things. My parents never had a washing machine nor a fridge up to their deaths in the 1970s.

Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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17-12-2016, 03:53 PM
RE: Appliances You Can Live Without
Favourite kit is my kettle, pressure cooker, microwave, panini press/grill and halogen oven/grill.

But I did, at an archaeologucal dig, learn to cook on an open fire using clay, green sticks, flat stones and leather bag/fire heated pebbles. Fish cooked with herbs in clay; rabbit or pigeons grilled on sticks next to the fire or as a stew in the leather bag, yum!

We had to catch dinner ourselves - but we had tinned stuff just in case!

Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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