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31-01-2014, 06:26 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
Perhaps this is more of a physician question, but I was wondering if I can still be considered a donor. I am a breast cancer survivor. I did not do any chemo or radiation and am at the 4+ year mark of being cancer free after mastectomies. Would I still be considered an acceptable donor?

Reading this thread kind of brought to mind that I have been a donor for so long that it didn't occur to me to ask that question.

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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31-01-2014, 06:38 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
To be as succinct as possible, and not to bother anyone, my only remaining curiosity was the one I last asked the mortician, and I'll repeat it again:

are there situations in which, specifically to prevent a dead body's fingers and toes from curling and instead keep them straight, morticians need to inject bodies with some kind or another of embalming fluid not during or after, but rather, *before* the full embalming?

Yes, I *know* I said that one already, so please don't bash me for it. But I just want to be sure about the issue. Anyone else can discuss it, but after I get that one answered, I assure you that I'll drop the topic. I had no intention of bothering anybody, and I am very sorry if I did, in fact, bother anyone thus far.
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31-01-2014, 06:40 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
(31-01-2014 04:41 PM)Invisible Boy Wrote:  
(31-01-2014 04:24 PM)Ohio Sky Wrote:  Wow! There's a lot of new questions here so I'll try to get to them as quickly as I can.


I call bullshit. On all of it. It's theoretically possible for someone to be in a catatonic state- near death, with shallow breathing, and be mistakenly pronounced dead. It's happened all over the world, though wirh current technologu in any developed nation it's all but unheard of.
However, embalming fluid is toxic. Very toxic. Even breathing the fumes is quite hazardous. If more than a few drops entered the blood stream, it would undoubtedly kill the person. There's no way the embalming process had begun already, then the person somehow came back to life.
Methods vary wildly throughout the world, but I've never heard of anyone using a syringe to inject preservatives before starting the full process. I don't see any reason that would be done. Usually a syringe is used after the embalming to put a lottle more chemical in areas that may not have gotten well preserved.

I see what your saying. A 'pre-embalming' injection in an actual dead body, *before* a full embalming, is of course quite absurd, since it would do little to slow decay. The fluid would just stagnate around the injected area. But what about the other possibility - that it was done in the hands & feet to prevent them from curling? Perhaps because to wait until the time of the full embalming, they would have already been curled and thus it would be too late to straighten them? Is that sort of practice, or something like it, done by morticians?

No. The hands don't really curl for no apparent reason. If the person was not yet in rigor, the fluid would help keep them in whatever position was desired, but rigor is far from irreversible. And if they were goomg to go through that trouble, I see no reason why they wouldn't just go ahead and embalm the body.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it- not even if I have said it- unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. - Buddha
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31-01-2014, 06:46 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
My thanks to Ohio Sky for answering my questions. That will be the last of it from me, and I do appreciate your patience!
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01-02-2014, 11:34 AM
RE: Ask a mortician
Hi, have you ever come across any pranks? We had a case here a while back were a golf ball was found lodged in the mouth of a mans body. According to the coroners court it was inserted between post mortem and embalmment. Very upsetting for the family and had people wondering if pranks happen more often and just go unnoticed.
http://www.irishcentral.com/news/dead-ma...74101.html

“The first duty of a man is to think for himself” ― José Martí
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01-02-2014, 06:25 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
(31-01-2014 09:48 AM)Luminon Wrote:  
(31-01-2014 07:10 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  Rolleyes

So, you are outside of nature and don't want to pollute nature with yourself. In other words, you consider yourself supernatural? People have been rotting in grounds for hundreds on millions of years, and ,millions will continue to do so on a daily basis. Your physiology isn't different form theirs. Also, any heavy metals your body contains came from 'mother earth'. They are returning from whence they came. Dying is a natural process for natural being back into a natural celestial body. You're not special.

Now I want to cheat mother earth and get shot into space - not my ashes, my body. Hopefully by the time I kick the bucket it will be a possibility. Not that it much matters when you're dead, but I don't like the idea of my body being embalmed nor being incinerated. Tomb would be my second choice. Just chucking me in the ground in a trash bag would be choice number three. After that, I guess burial at sea. Nothing else appeals to me particularly, but I guess some preservation would be cool. Who knows? You could wind up in a museum some day. Plastinization, mummification, cryogenics, pickling, there are lots of options.
I'm not outside of nature, but what about my mercury dental fillings, what about my future arthritic deposits, heavy metals and toxins in fat, tapeworm eggs in my muscles, viruses in my nerve cell coatings, who am I to release all that crap into the nature?

People have been rotting in ground for millions of years and people have also been getting sick for millions of years. Somebody should do a good study on how viruses, bacteria and all the other parasites survive in ground, where do they get carried by worms and so on. What about the deep ground waters and cadaverous fluids seeping into it?

All that shit exists in nature; every chemical, every parasite, every toxin, every metal. You are very small in the big scheme of things; utterly insignificant. All of the things that you perceive of as being 'bad for nature' is part of it, and all of those things are present in millions of other living things that die every day. The materials that compose us all is recycled, regardless of how you go out.

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01-02-2014, 07:06 PM (This post was last modified: 01-02-2014 07:19 PM by Luminon.)
RE: Ask a mortician
(31-01-2014 05:12 PM)Ohio Sky Wrote:  First, I have to say that I find your views on funerals and the dead to be a little disrespectful.
The days of people wanting a full funeral just because it's traditional for their religion are fast disappearing. People want viewings because in many cases, it's the only chance they will get to say goodbye to someone who means a lot to them. People who pass away suddenly, like in auto accidents, are among the most likely to be embalmed and viewed. Why? Because seeing the person helps give people closure. If you lost a young child in an unexpected accident, would ypu want a chance to say goodbye? Many people benefot from this and it's a part of the healing process. To write is off as 'morbid' is insulting and incredibly mean spirited.
Secondly, if the Mercury in your fillings hasn't affected your health yet, what makes you think it's going to be substantial enough to cause any issues after you are dead and gone? The amount of heavy metals in the human body is negligible and inconsequential. As far as viruses and such go, this is the primary reason for embalming. Formaldehyde kills pretty much everything under the sun.
Thirdly, in most areas of the US, you must be buried in a sealed casket and/or a vault. The odds of any tape worm eggs surviving long enough for the concrete around you to degrade is pretty slim.
There's really no difference between us and the rest of the animal kingdom, and everyone has buried a family pet in their backyard without causing widespread disease or zombie apocalypse or anything. Your view of death as icky and scary has no rational basis.

As far as your question though, there is currently no widely available method for final disposition aside from the traditional burial or cremation. I've seen something similar to wwhat you described, though I'm not sure if it's exactly thr same. But I've never actually encountered a funeral home that offered it. The technology is far more expensive than a standard crematorium, so it could be a while still before we see this sort of thing in use regularly.
Well, my aching heart might be a bit non-sentimental. As a boy, I had read the books about Tibet by Lobsang Rampa (pseudonym of a British author, I know) and you know how they used to dispose of the bodies there - chop them up, crush the bones and skull, offer it all to vultures. It didn't bother me back then and it doesn't bother me now. Yes, it's messy. But it is much less messy that to put the body into the ground, encapsulated in clothes, wooden casket and concrete tomb.

For me, the body is something like a car. A car is equipment and our cars get crushed at a scrap yard and recycled. Recycling is good. If we believe that consciousness is the process, what we love is the process, not the substance. We can not hold onto the process.

= I am messed up and nobody important died on me yet.

(01-02-2014 06:25 PM)Dark Light Wrote:  All that shit exists in nature; every chemical, every parasite, every toxin, every metal. You are very small in the big scheme of things; utterly insignificant. All of the things that you perceive of as being 'bad for nature' is part of it, and all of those things are present in millions of other living things that die every day. The materials that compose us all is recycled, regardless of how you go out.
Not necessarily me. But what about the humanity? What if a world-wide law prohibited dumping bodies into the ground, instead filtering them chemically... would that cause a decrease in disease occurrence in several centuries? There are 7 billions of us today, that's a lot of viruses. Nevermind nature, what about what WE want to have in our environment? Is burial really an intelligent, scientific way to behave? Surely there are better ways to honor the living relatives' feelings than by contaminating the air, soil and waters. I'd rather be honored by a hi-tech ecological body disposal method than undergo a long and undignified process of letting go of the soft tissue.
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01-02-2014, 07:29 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
Split thread.

I hope it's ok now. Smile


God is a concept by which we measure our pain -- John Lennon

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01-02-2014, 07:50 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
I'm always against outlawing nature. So far it hasn't done us much good. Aside from that, I don't think there are tangible benefits to it, and it would be impossible to pass such a world-wide law, and just and impossible to enforce. If we lived in such a world where something like that could be passed and enforced I wouldn't care to live in it.

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01-02-2014, 08:36 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
(31-01-2014 05:43 PM)BrokenQuill92 Wrote:  Do you ever get creeped out by the dead bodies?
No. It's never bothered me. Everyone is different in this regard, though. Some people are and get used to it, and some just never get used to it.

(31-01-2014 05:51 PM)BrokenQuill92 Wrote:  Are dead people really heavy?
If they were heavy before they died, yes.
There's a lot of technique to moving bodies that doesn't require just lifting them. Even if the person is quite petite, a body is a very awkward thing to lift so we try to avoid it.

(31-01-2014 05:52 PM)BrokenQuill92 Wrote:  Are dead people stay cold or do they go back to room temp at some point?
Dead bodies are always room temperature. That's why we keep them in refrigeration if they aren't embalmed.

(31-01-2014 05:54 PM)BrokenQuill92 Wrote:  Is it true that under black women's scalps it's all gross from the relaxer chemicals that straighten hair?

I can't say I've ever seen the inside of a black woman's scalp, honestly. We don't do much business in the african american community here. I don't think it would somehow seep into the scalp though. That seems improbable.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it- not even if I have said it- unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. - Buddha
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