Ask a mortician
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01-12-2013, 12:37 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
(01-12-2013 12:31 PM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  I don't know if this has been asked already, but how did you get into the field? If its already been asked just skip this question, lol

I did answer this briefly earlier, but I don't mind repeating myself (I do it often enough without realizing it).

I grew up in a very small town and worked in a restaurant through college. I was there for a long time and really starting to hate my job. Ok, had hated it for a while. The owner of the local mortuary came in regularly and asked one of the waitresses one day if she knew anyone who might be interested in working for him. She gave him my name and he called and asked me to come in for an interview, and hired me on the spot. I started out making arrangements with families, doing inventory, filing death certificates and insurance policies and other office-type stuff. The funeral director got me in the back pretty quickly doing cosmetics and I discovered I quite enjoyed it and had a natural talent for it that far exceeds my people skills.

A few years and a few jobs later, I was offered an apprenticeship at a mortuary in a nearby city and decided to take it. Again, I didn't apply for or seek this position. I wasn't even working in the field at that time. It just kinda keeps pulling me back in. lol

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it- not even if I have said it- unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. - Buddha
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01-12-2013, 12:39 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
(01-12-2013 12:32 PM)ALMASSAH Wrote:  
(01-12-2013 12:30 PM)Ohio Sky Wrote:  No. Rolleyes

It's true; the Judeo-Nazi-Capitalist-Communist Demons used it to their advantage in WWII!

I've discovered black people have thicker skin and are generally harder to embalm. What do you suppose is the reason for that?

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it- not even if I have said it- unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. - Buddha
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01-12-2013, 12:43 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
(01-12-2013 12:39 PM)Ohio Sky Wrote:  
(01-12-2013 12:32 PM)ALMASSAH Wrote:  It's true; the Judeo-Nazi-Capitalist-Communist Demons used it to their advantage in WWII!

I've discovered black people have thicker skin and are generally harder to embalm. What do you suppose is the reason for that?

'Cause they don't want to be?

As it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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01-12-2013, 12:47 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
(01-12-2013 12:37 PM)Ohio Sky Wrote:  
(01-12-2013 12:31 PM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  I don't know if this has been asked already, but how did you get into the field? If its already been asked just skip this question, lol

I did answer this briefly earlier, but I don't mind repeating myself (I do it often enough without realizing it).

I grew up in a very small town and worked in a restaurant through college. I was there for a long time and really starting to hate my job. Ok, had hated it for a while. The owner of the local mortuary came in regularly and asked one of the waitresses one day if she knew anyone who might be interested in working for him. She gave him my name and he called and asked me to come in for an interview, and hired me on the spot. I started out making arrangements with families, doing inventory, filing death certificates and insurance policies and other office-type stuff. The funeral director got me in the back pretty quickly doing cosmetics and I discovered I quite enjoyed it and had a natural talent for it that far exceeds my people skills.

A few years and a few jobs later, I was offered an apprenticeship at a mortuary in a nearby city and decided to take it. Again, I didn't apply for or seek this position. I wasn't even working in the field at that time. It just kinda keeps pulling me back in. lol

Alright neat. I'll have to pass it on. I know a woman who is actually quite interested in doing the same sort of work.
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01-12-2013, 12:51 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
(01-12-2013 12:47 PM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  
(01-12-2013 12:37 PM)Ohio Sky Wrote:  I did answer this briefly earlier, but I don't mind repeating myself (I do it often enough without realizing it).

I grew up in a very small town and worked in a restaurant through college. I was there for a long time and really starting to hate my job. Ok, had hated it for a while. The owner of the local mortuary came in regularly and asked one of the waitresses one day if she knew anyone who might be interested in working for him. She gave him my name and he called and asked me to come in for an interview, and hired me on the spot. I started out making arrangements with families, doing inventory, filing death certificates and insurance policies and other office-type stuff. The funeral director got me in the back pretty quickly doing cosmetics and I discovered I quite enjoyed it and had a natural talent for it that far exceeds my people skills.

A few years and a few jobs later, I was offered an apprenticeship at a mortuary in a nearby city and decided to take it. Again, I didn't apply for or seek this position. I wasn't even working in the field at that time. It just kinda keeps pulling me back in. lol

Alright neat. I'll have to pass it on. I know a woman who is actually quite interested in doing the same sort of work.

She would have to figure out what the standards are in her state. Abfse.org is a good starting place.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it- not even if I have said it- unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. - Buddha
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29-01-2014, 10:37 PM
RE: Ask a mortician
Well, I guess I'm a bit late to the party but here it goes:

I have a thread in the pseudociences & conspiracies section of this board regarding an alleged miracle in which a human being, in modern times, was supposedly raised back to life, over 48 hours *after* being declared clinically dead. This event happened in Nigeria. There are a lot of details about it; I had to do quite a bit of searching around the internet for them. I could eventually find all the sources and list them, but for brevity's sake I'll list the two that really stand out:

First, the mortician supposedly injected about half a dozen syringes full of embalming fluid into this guy's presumably dead body *before* attempting a full embalming. I don't understand what good that would do. One webpage said it was in the hands & feet, to prevent curling of his fingers & toes. Another mentions to "slow "decomposition". In any case, is that order of embalming fluid injections--a substantial amount of them, with a syringe, *then* a full embalming later--regularly done, in developing nations or elsewhere?

Second, some supernatural-phenomenon was suspected of being caused by the corpse, including receiving electric "shocks" when attempting to touch it & and actually perform the full embalming, and later on hearing choir-like singing from the room it was in. Allegedly, the mortician got freaked out by this and told the family of the dead man to come take the corpse away. They did, placed it in a coffin & put cotton balls in the 'dead' man's nostrils. A day later, in church, with many people praying, the man supposedly was resurrected. Could very shallow breathing allow somebody to survive, even with cotton in their ears & being in a coffin?

I appreciate any help given.
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30-01-2014, 08:00 AM
RE: Ask a mortician
Could you put the ashes of a cremated body in a compost heap or spread it on a vegetable patch as a mulch?

It seems a waste to throw it away if it helps grow some better produce. Or would there be too many contaminants?
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31-01-2014, 12:22 AM
RE: Ask a mortician
Ok obviously the family's requests come first, but the thought of what clothes my mother would have be buried/cremated in scares me more than death itself.

Do you take into consideration arrangement from BFF's and other friends who have a much better idea what the deceased would want?
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31-01-2014, 06:29 AM
RE: Ask a mortician
I find it offensive to pollute the ground of mother Nature with my corpse, which will be likely full of heavy metals, viruses, bacteria, toxins and so on. Cremation sounds better, but it's tough on energy demands, smoke pollution and grinding of charred bones to powder. So it's still not good enough.

I've heard of aquamation, it's reputedly a very fast, easy and cheap method of corpse disposal, used mostly on animals. Is it also available commercially for "funerals" (or lack of thereof)? It is my ideal that bodies should be disposed of ecologically for free by law, saving Americans 50,000 bucks per death for more important things than funeral, such as healthcare.

As much as I'm against law and taxes, human corpses are a pollutant and their hygienic disposal is a scientific injunction. I think that is a superior argument to sentiment of living people who want to hug and handle the body as their morbid religions taught them to. I'd be looking forward to some dirt-cheap yet hi-tech inhumation method. Any news on that horizon?
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31-01-2014, 07:05 AM
RE: Ask a mortician
OK, more realistic question - what is the cheapest, simpliest most ecologic dead man's deal we can get at the mortuary? No rituals or fancy stuff. Cardboard coffin, if possible.
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