Atheist parents and Santa Clause
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17-11-2015, 11:22 AM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
When my kids got older, in their teenage years we watched the Bad Santa movie. That pretty much killed the jolly old man thing. Lol, it's still one of my favorite Christmas movies. Laugh out load




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17-11-2015, 11:47 AM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
(17-11-2015 10:59 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  Hafnof that's what I was thinking. Why not make it into a first lesson of critical thinking?

Problem is Near is VERY against it at all. Don't know what I'll do.

Get rid of Near? Consider

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17-11-2015, 11:50 AM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
(17-11-2015 11:47 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(17-11-2015 10:59 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  Hafnof that's what I was thinking. Why not make it into a first lesson of critical thinking?

Problem is Near is VERY against it at all. Don't know what I'll do.

Get rid of Near? Consider

Haha, only if you replace him Chas. Tongue

Seriously though, no way! I loves my Near! Just need to find a comprise.
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17-11-2015, 12:54 PM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
(17-11-2015 11:50 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  
(17-11-2015 11:47 AM)Chas Wrote:  Get rid of Near? Consider

Haha, only if you replace him Chas. Tongue

Seriously though, no way! I loves my Near! Just need to find a comprise.

What would you like Near to be comprised of?

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
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17-11-2015, 04:24 PM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
I'm going to let my daughters believe in Santa (though my oldest doesn't, she's 11). I think it's important for a kid to believe that anything is possible. That they can become an astronaut, or President of the United States. That a fat man in a red suit can travel across the world in a single night and deliver presents to all the children of the world.
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17-11-2015, 07:38 PM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
(17-11-2015 04:24 PM)Ash Wrote:  I'm going to let my daughters believe in Santa (though my oldest doesn't, she's 11). I think it's important for a kid to believe that anything is possible. That they can become an astronaut, or President of the United States. That a fat man in a red suit can travel across the world in a single night and deliver presents to all the children of the world.

I doubt children can't aspire to be great things if they don't believe in magic.
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18-11-2015, 09:48 AM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
(17-11-2015 07:38 PM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  
(17-11-2015 04:24 PM)Ash Wrote:  I'm going to let my daughters believe in Santa (though my oldest doesn't, she's 11). I think it's important for a kid to believe that anything is possible. That they can become an astronaut, or President of the United States. That a fat man in a red suit can travel across the world in a single night and deliver presents to all the children of the world.

I doubt children can't aspire to be great things if they don't believe in magic.

I never said otherwise.

However, a belief in Santa Claus, the tooth fairy, the easter bunny and other such fictional characters fosters a child's imagination and creativity. To believe the world is filled with magic gives a child a sense of endless wonder.
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18-11-2015, 11:07 AM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
(18-11-2015 09:48 AM)Ash Wrote:  However, a belief in Santa Claus, the tooth fairy, the easter bunny and other such fictional characters fosters a child's imagination and creativity. To believe the world is filled with magic gives a child a sense of endless wonder.

Perhaps. But reality instills a different kind of endless wonder. One that children can carry into adulthood. Who needs to believe the world is filled with magic when there's an entire universe of awesome that actually exists? Santa is fun and all, but fairy tales should not be where your kids are getting their creativity from. Imagination and creativity should come from things like art and play.

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18-11-2015, 11:53 AM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
(15-11-2015 09:50 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  Gasp! Necromancy....

Near and I are starting to debate this a bit with Hobbit getting closer to understanding such things.

He feels that lying to your kid is a dick move and sets the standard of us being dishonest with her. I have come to agree with him. That said I also remember enjoying Santa as a kid, and I'd like for her to experience the magic of that.

Ugh. Nothing is ever simple.
I will probably do something similar to what my mom did...which is allow the lore of Santa into the home, but never outright lie and say that Santa is real. Similar to Hafnot's strategy, I will treat it like a game, and see how long it takes them to figure it out. If they ask me questions I will give them vague non-answers, like, "I don't know, what do you think?" I'll probably prank my kids with half eaten cookies and charcoal footprints and such too. It's gunna be fun.

I actually never believed in Santa, but it has always been a fun part of the season.

(15-11-2015 07:57 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  I don't know of any kid that later found out Santa wasn't real and got pissed at mom and dad.
My mom decided to specifically never "lie" to my siblings and I about Santa because she was led to believe Santa was real until middle school. Then at school one day she got in a public argument with a girl who said Santa wasn't real. Of course my mom defended that Santa was real. At her home that night, my Grandma told my mom that Santa was indeed not real...my mom was crushed and felt so so so betrayed. She was pissed at her parents and felt like she was humiliated in school. She decided then to never lie to her kids about Santa.

(17-11-2015 04:18 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Little shit is almost 19 and she still gets Santa presents too. Dodgy
I still get presents from Santa and I'm 28 Tongue.

(17-11-2015 10:31 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  I'm my house Santa = First major critical thinking puzzle with motivated self interest concealing the truth. When my daughter passed this test by saying "I think it's your parents" I grinned widely and said "Well done! You did it!". To me a child coming out to their parents as a non-Santa-believer is a graduation event to be celebrated.

Santa still gives her presents. The tooth fairy still gives her coins. It's not a lie. It's a metaphor. It's a fun magical game.

In the figuring out stage I try not to lie, and I encourage my kids to reflect on questions. I'll talk about Santa coming in much the same way both before and after they figure it out.
Good approach!

(18-11-2015 09:48 AM)Ash Wrote:  
(17-11-2015 07:38 PM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  I doubt children can't aspire to be great things if they don't believe in magic.

I never said otherwise.

However, a belief in Santa Claus, the tooth fairy, the easter bunny and other such fictional characters fosters a child's imagination and creativity. To believe the world is filled with magic gives a child a sense of endless wonder.
I never believed in any of those things, but I always did love video games (which I knew were fiction). Also, mythology, movies, and animation give plenty of inspiration for imagination. As an elementary schooler I used to want to write books about fantastic adventures of groups of heroes making their way through caves and dungeons. Of course many would die along the way Tongue.

I prefer fantasy, but I have to live in reality.
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18-11-2015, 12:09 PM
RE: Atheist parents and Santa Clause
(18-11-2015 11:07 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Perhaps. But reality instills a different kind of endless wonder. One that children can carry into adulthood. Who needs to believe the world is filled with magic when there's an entire universe of awesome that actually exists? Santa is fun and all, but fairy tales should not be where your kids are getting their creativity from. Imagination and creativity should come from things like art and play.

Why not?

Why shouldn't kids have their imaginations stretched by things that aren't grounded in reality? I mean the reality is that your kid isn't going to ever be President of the United States. Most likely they're going to end up with mountains of college debt, working a job they either hate or not getting paid enough to pay off that debt.
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