Atheistic and Theistic Universes
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
09-03-2015, 03:49 AM
RE: Atheistic and Theistic Universes
(09-03-2015 01:40 AM)Stevil Wrote:  
(07-03-2015 01:38 PM)Transfinite Wrote:  Greetings! This is my first thread and I hope it isn't too silly! If we live in a multiverse as some cosmologists claim, is it possible there may be other universes with a different configeration that allows for the evolution of beings that are far superior to us in ability?
There are many beings that are far superior to us in ability within our observable universe.
Most animals are quicker than us, many are stronger, many are much better swimmers, many can swim better, can see better, some have better memories than us. Human's are really quite feeble in many ways.

Given the size of our observable universe and the age of it, it seems quite conceivable that there are many, many life forms that are or have been more intelligent than us. Sometimes I am quite embarrassed to be a human when I see how stupid we are as a species.

Why don't you stop going to church then?
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
09-03-2015, 05:21 AM
RE: Atheistic and Theistic Universes
(09-03-2015 03:49 AM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  Why don't you stop going to church then?
I've never really been to church, apart from a wedding and a couple of funerals.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
09-03-2015, 05:39 AM
RE: Atheistic and Theistic Universes
This will be my last post on the math portion brought up.

The following link is to an article about the -1/12 video "sum".

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/root...-negative/

If you have, for example, three numbers you want to add together, you can add any two of them first and then add the third one to the resulting sum. We can keep doing this for any finite number of addends (and the laws of arithmetic say that we will get the same answer no matter what order we add them in), but when we try to add an infinite number of terms together, we have to make a choice about what addition means. The most common way to deal with infinite addition is by using the concept of a limit.

Roughly speaking, we say that the sum of an infinite series is a number L if, as we add more and more terms, we get closer and closer to the number L. If L is finite, we call the series convergent. One example of a convergent series is 1/2+1/4+1/8+1/16…. This series converges to the number 1. It’s pretty easy to see why: after the first term, we’re halfway to 1. After the second term, we’re half of the remaining distance to 1, and so on.

At the end of the video, producer Brady Haran asks physicist Tony Padilla whether, if you kept adding integers forever on your calculator and hit the “equal” button at the end, you’d get -1/12. Padilla cheekily says, “You have to go to infinity, Brady!” But the answer should have been “No!” Here, I think they missed an opportunity to clarify that they are using an alternate way of assigning a value to an infinite series that would have made the video much less misleading.

Substituting the number -1/12 for the sum of the positive integers can be useful in physics, but that is all they have done.

It is incorrect to call this the Sum of all positive integers.

This extra footage from numberphile gives a broader explanation of why it's useful to assign -1/12 as the Sum of all positive integers .




Insanity - doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: