Atheists who work out
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13-03-2016, 09:05 AM
RE: Atheists who work out
(13-03-2016 09:01 AM)jennybee Wrote:  
(13-03-2016 08:48 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  Alright. After a break I'm back on the ball again. Its hard to stay focused on doing something for yourself when most of that focus has to be funneled towards a toddler. (Not that I mind, I'm loving having a toddler)

A few years ago when I was extremely busy and had zero time for working out, I found these workout dvds called The Firm Express workout kit. It's a workout dvd bundle that gives you several workout DVDs and you do 3 a week for 20 minutes each. So basically a total of one hour of exercise a week. It's based on hit and circuit workouts. They are a total body workout and were actually kind of fun to do. It has a beginner section, intermediate, and advanced. I was able to tone up fairly quickly from just using it (along with healthy meal plan). You can get it on amazon or probably a place like target even.

Thats actually perfect. I'm going to look them up now! I just need something I can fit into my week somehow!

In the near future (if something in the works actually happens) I'm going to be getting a gym membership to a place that has a childrens play area/daycare. So hopefully I wont need to get dvds, but if it doesnt work out this may be perfect.
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13-03-2016, 09:23 AM
RE: Atheists who work out
(13-03-2016 08:21 AM)jennybee Wrote:  
(13-03-2016 02:10 AM)Szuchow Wrote:  I understand. I too prefer them on woman Wink


Reading such posts make me feel lazy Sad.

Maybe it's time for returning to sword fighting?

You should!

I think so too. Equipment though is far from cheap.

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

Mikhail Bakunin.
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13-03-2016, 09:53 AM
RE: Atheists who work out
My 4 year old likes working out with me. My one year old isn't quite there yet.

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13-03-2016, 10:04 AM
RE: Atheists who work out
(13-03-2016 09:05 AM)Hobbitgirl Wrote:  
(13-03-2016 09:01 AM)jennybee Wrote:  A few years ago when I was extremely busy and had zero time for working out, I found these workout dvds called The Firm Express workout kit. It's a workout dvd bundle that gives you several workout DVDs and you do 3 a week for 20 minutes each. So basically a total of one hour of exercise a week. It's based on hit and circuit workouts. They are a total body workout and were actually kind of fun to do. It has a beginner section, intermediate, and advanced. I was able to tone up fairly quickly from just using it (along with healthy meal plan). You can get it on amazon or probably a place like target even.

Thats actually perfect. I'm going to look them up now! I just need something I can fit into my week somehow!

In the near future (if something in the works actually happens) I'm going to be getting a gym membership to a place that has a childrens play area/daycare. So hopefully I wont need to get dvds, but if it doesnt work out this may be perfect.

I thought it was a really good, quick, effective workout. I saw a used copy on amazon for fifty bucks, but you will also need to buy some Hand weights for these dvds if you don't have any already.

I also liked The Firm's Weighted Cardio Gloves Kit workout. It was like 30 bucks on amazon. It's just one DVD but comes with everything you need (i.e. the weighted gloves) and you don't need to purchase any extra sets of weights. This workout is also 20 mins and you could probably get the same effect as the firm express kit if you used it three times a week. It's kind of a circuit kickboxing workout. I still use it sometimes for a quick cardio workout. I also thought it was kind of fun and it pretty much works everything. The gloves can be a little cumbersome until you get used to them.

The other thing I did was the 100 push challenge. You start slow and pretty much anyone can do it. You just need like 5-10 minutes a day. Push ups are great for toning and building strength and they also work your core. The 100 push up challenge is available online and the best part about it, its free Wink I did that and also ran or walked a few times a few times a week.
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15-03-2016, 08:38 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
This is a Ross Enamait blog post from a couple years back that I was reminded of both by reading over the past couple pages, and also as I watch spring trying its hardest to emerge. Some of you who are wanting to get working but under the impression that a gym or finely tuned plan is necessary might find it worth a read Smile I personally prefer what we refer to as odd object workouts outdoors. The gym makes me feel like a hamster.

Just Work

Quote:[Image: stone_carry2.jpg]

Following a recent entry about outdoor training, I woke up the next morning to find my inbox filled with questions. Many readers seemed interested in stone or log lifting, but were genuinely confused about how to track progress with an unmarked odd object.

For instance, one reader of the site wrote the following:

“It’s fun to train outside, but how do I know if I am getting any stronger.”

He went on to explain his fondness for stone lifting, but expressed frustration over his inability to weigh any of the stones that he lifts. Like myself, this individual trains in the woods so does not have a convenient way to determine the weight of the stones that he uses.
Numbers Don’t Matter

Fortunately, you do not need to know the exact weight of a stone to benefit from it. Speaking for myself, I have a huge assortment of stones in the woods that I often lift and carry. I honestly have no idea what the stones weigh. When I lift stones, I am not concerned about training with a specific percentage of my 1-rep max.

Instead, I use my own informal scale. I classify my stones into categories such as somewhat heavy, heavy, and ridiculously heavy. At times, some of my athletes have even added four letter descriptive terms to enhance my classifications. One stone in particular is often described as being heavy as f–k. And while that description may seem inappropriate, it makes perfect sense once you get your hands on the stone.
Progress Doesn’t Hide

As for monitoring progress, I don’t need a pound or kilogram stamp on the side of the stone to know whether or not it is challenging me. When I lift the stones, some go up without too much of a struggle while others require every ounce of strength I have. It’s safe to say that if I regularly lift or carry the more challenging stones, I will eventually become stronger. I don’t need to solve a calculus equation to determine whether I have progressed or not.

If the stone goes up easier, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can throw the stone farther, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can lift the stone for more reps, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can carry the stone more distance, I have probably gotten stronger. I could go on and on with additional examples, but I’m sure you get point. Once you become better at lifting, carrying, or throwing a particular stone, you will know you have improved. You can then seek out a larger and more challenging stone. It really does not need to be more complicated than that.

Ultimately, progress is not nearly as difficult to recognize as many of the pencil pushers would like you to believe. Strength does not hide in the dark. It is easily noticed. As you become stronger, you are going to know. It will not be a secret.
Final Thoughts

Whether you train indoors or out, don’t get lost in the math. It is often best to minimize the complexity and just work. If you regularly challenge yourself against difficult types of resistance, you are going to improve. It does not matter if the resistance comes from stones, logs, free weights, or anything else you can think of lifting. Show up regularly, work hard with whatever you have, and you will progress.

And if or when progress is absent, don’t be so quick to blame the tool or your lack of knowledge regarding its weight. Often times the source of the problem is only visible when you look into the mirror. Stone lifting is like many things in life. You get what you put into it.

Related Entry:

Beyond Sets and Reps

+++++

“Dealing with complexity is an inefficient and unnecessary waste of time, attention and mental energy. There is never any justification for things being complex when they could be simple.” – Edward de Bono

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15-03-2016, 09:29 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
(15-03-2016 08:38 PM)yakherder Wrote:  This is a Ross Enamait blog post from a couple years back that I was reminded of both by reading over the past couple pages, and also as I watch spring trying its hardest to emerge. Some of you who are wanting to get working but under the impression that a gym or finely tuned plan is necessary might find it worth a read Smile I personally prefer what we refer to as odd object workouts outdoors. The gym makes me feel like a hamster.

Just Work

Quote:[Image: stone_carry2.jpg]

Following a recent entry about outdoor training, I woke up the next morning to find my inbox filled with questions. Many readers seemed interested in stone or log lifting, but were genuinely confused about how to track progress with an unmarked odd object.

For instance, one reader of the site wrote the following:

“It’s fun to train outside, but how do I know if I am getting any stronger.”

He went on to explain his fondness for stone lifting, but expressed frustration over his inability to weigh any of the stones that he lifts. Like myself, this individual trains in the woods so does not have a convenient way to determine the weight of the stones that he uses.
Numbers Don’t Matter

Fortunately, you do not need to know the exact weight of a stone to benefit from it. Speaking for myself, I have a huge assortment of stones in the woods that I often lift and carry. I honestly have no idea what the stones weigh. When I lift stones, I am not concerned about training with a specific percentage of my 1-rep max.

Instead, I use my own informal scale. I classify my stones into categories such as somewhat heavy, heavy, and ridiculously heavy. At times, some of my athletes have even added four letter descriptive terms to enhance my classifications. One stone in particular is often described as being heavy as f–k. And while that description may seem inappropriate, it makes perfect sense once you get your hands on the stone.
Progress Doesn’t Hide

As for monitoring progress, I don’t need a pound or kilogram stamp on the side of the stone to know whether or not it is challenging me. When I lift the stones, some go up without too much of a struggle while others require every ounce of strength I have. It’s safe to say that if I regularly lift or carry the more challenging stones, I will eventually become stronger. I don’t need to solve a calculus equation to determine whether I have progressed or not.

If the stone goes up easier, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can throw the stone farther, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can lift the stone for more reps, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can carry the stone more distance, I have probably gotten stronger. I could go on and on with additional examples, but I’m sure you get point. Once you become better at lifting, carrying, or throwing a particular stone, you will know you have improved. You can then seek out a larger and more challenging stone. It really does not need to be more complicated than that.

Ultimately, progress is not nearly as difficult to recognize as many of the pencil pushers would like you to believe. Strength does not hide in the dark. It is easily noticed. As you become stronger, you are going to know. It will not be a secret.
Final Thoughts

Whether you train indoors or out, don’t get lost in the math. It is often best to minimize the complexity and just work. If you regularly challenge yourself against difficult types of resistance, you are going to improve. It does not matter if the resistance comes from stones, logs, free weights, or anything else you can think of lifting. Show up regularly, work hard with whatever you have, and you will progress.

And if or when progress is absent, don’t be so quick to blame the tool or your lack of knowledge regarding its weight. Often times the source of the problem is only visible when you look into the mirror. Stone lifting is like many things in life. You get what you put into it.

Related Entry:

Beyond Sets and Reps

+++++

“Dealing with complexity is an inefficient and unnecessary waste of time, attention and mental energy. There is never any justification for things being complex when they could be simple.” – Edward de Bono

Did I tell you I bought his jump rope conditioning course a few years ago? He packs a lot of value into his stuff. I'd have paid three times as much, but I think it's really cool that he keeps it affordable for young and hungry fighters with no money. Thumbsup

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15-03-2016, 09:40 PM (This post was last modified: 15-03-2016 09:49 PM by yakherder.)
RE: Atheists who work out
(15-03-2016 09:29 PM)Can_of_Beans Wrote:  
(15-03-2016 08:38 PM)yakherder Wrote:  This is a Ross Enamait blog post from a couple years back that I was reminded of both by reading over the past couple pages, and also as I watch spring trying its hardest to emerge. Some of you who are wanting to get working but under the impression that a gym or finely tuned plan is necessary might find it worth a read Smile I personally prefer what we refer to as odd object workouts outdoors. The gym makes me feel like a hamster.

Just Work


Did I tell you I bought his jump rope conditioning course a few years ago? He packs a lot of value into his stuff. I'd have paid three times as much, but I think it's really cool that he keeps it affordable for young and hungry fighters with no money. Thumbsup

I'll admit I'm kind of an Enamait groupie. I've got every single thing he's put out, and his book "Never Gymless" more or less forms the core of my workout plan.

'Murican Canadian
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16-03-2016, 07:32 AM
RE: Atheists who work out
(15-03-2016 08:38 PM)yakherder Wrote:  This is a Ross Enamait blog post from a couple years back that I was reminded of both by reading over the past couple pages, and also as I watch spring trying its hardest to emerge. Some of you who are wanting to get working but under the impression that a gym or finely tuned plan is necessary might find it worth a read Smile I personally prefer what we refer to as odd object workouts outdoors. The gym makes me feel like a hamster.

Just Work

Quote:[Image: stone_carry2.jpg]

Following a recent entry about outdoor training, I woke up the next morning to find my inbox filled with questions. Many readers seemed interested in stone or log lifting, but were genuinely confused about how to track progress with an unmarked odd object.

For instance, one reader of the site wrote the following:

“It’s fun to train outside, but how do I know if I am getting any stronger.”

He went on to explain his fondness for stone lifting, but expressed frustration over his inability to weigh any of the stones that he lifts. Like myself, this individual trains in the woods so does not have a convenient way to determine the weight of the stones that he uses.
Numbers Don’t Matter

Fortunately, you do not need to know the exact weight of a stone to benefit from it. Speaking for myself, I have a huge assortment of stones in the woods that I often lift and carry. I honestly have no idea what the stones weigh. When I lift stones, I am not concerned about training with a specific percentage of my 1-rep max.

Instead, I use my own informal scale. I classify my stones into categories such as somewhat heavy, heavy, and ridiculously heavy. At times, some of my athletes have even added four letter descriptive terms to enhance my classifications. One stone in particular is often described as being heavy as f–k. And while that description may seem inappropriate, it makes perfect sense once you get your hands on the stone.
Progress Doesn’t Hide

As for monitoring progress, I don’t need a pound or kilogram stamp on the side of the stone to know whether or not it is challenging me. When I lift the stones, some go up without too much of a struggle while others require every ounce of strength I have. It’s safe to say that if I regularly lift or carry the more challenging stones, I will eventually become stronger. I don’t need to solve a calculus equation to determine whether I have progressed or not.

If the stone goes up easier, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can throw the stone farther, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can lift the stone for more reps, I have probably gotten stronger. If I can carry the stone more distance, I have probably gotten stronger. I could go on and on with additional examples, but I’m sure you get point. Once you become better at lifting, carrying, or throwing a particular stone, you will know you have improved. You can then seek out a larger and more challenging stone. It really does not need to be more complicated than that.

Ultimately, progress is not nearly as difficult to recognize as many of the pencil pushers would like you to believe. Strength does not hide in the dark. It is easily noticed. As you become stronger, you are going to know. It will not be a secret.
Final Thoughts

Whether you train indoors or out, don’t get lost in the math. It is often best to minimize the complexity and just work. If you regularly challenge yourself against difficult types of resistance, you are going to improve. It does not matter if the resistance comes from stones, logs, free weights, or anything else you can think of lifting. Show up regularly, work hard with whatever you have, and you will progress.

And if or when progress is absent, don’t be so quick to blame the tool or your lack of knowledge regarding its weight. Often times the source of the problem is only visible when you look into the mirror. Stone lifting is like many things in life. You get what you put into it.

Related Entry:

Beyond Sets and Reps

+++++

“Dealing with complexity is an inefficient and unnecessary waste of time, attention and mental energy. There is never any justification for things being complex when they could be simple.” – Edward de Bono

I Favorited the page. Thanks for the info.

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23-03-2016, 09:16 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
Fitness test next week, first thing Sunday morning. Also received an e-mail saying the next task will involve routine medical checkups that require all of us to have fasted for 24 hours prior. Facepalm Someone didn't coordinate too well...

I'm sure some of the newer guys will actually follow that order. I personally learned to separate which bullshit matters from which bullshit doesn't, and I'll be eating a light meal the night before and two bananas about 30 minutes before the fitness test. The fitness test affects my promotion points. The medical checkup can be rescheduled, and me messing it up by not being fasted may at worst result in an ass chewing. Priorities...

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23-03-2016, 09:37 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
I've gained 20 pounds of delicious fast food since separating a few ribs 5 and a half(?) months ago. Can't wait to start riding to work... Been stuck on this stationary bike in front of my PC for too long (and not long enough, I guess)
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