Atheists who work out
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29-03-2017, 08:32 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
(29-03-2017 11:44 AM)skyking Wrote:  Monday I started a new job , 10 hour days plus commute cut into my workouts. Still doing 2 cardios daily, but one is usually short.

That sucks when life gets in the way of our workouts, but good that you're getting the cardio in.

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30-03-2017, 02:41 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
(28-03-2017 04:29 PM)Leerob Wrote:  
(24-03-2017 09:35 PM)yakherder Wrote:  I'd say don't make it too complex initially. Wait to get more OCD about the science behind it once you've developed the habit. Include a few sets (at least 3, preferably 5) of each of the following a couple times per week, with 45 seconds to 5 minutes of rest between sets:
• Pushups, bench press, overhead press, or any other exercise that involves pushing with your arms.
• Pullups, curls, overhead pull, or any other exercise that involves pulling with your arms.
• Any squat variation.
• Dead lift

Targeted core exercises are not absolutely necessary at the beginner stages, as you'll be getting plenty of secondary core work from pretty much any other exercise. If you feel the need, however, I'd suggest always saving core training for last or even on rest(ish) days.

Even though you specified upper body strength, I'd suggest not ignoring the legs. They've got too many big, strong muscles to be ignored. Keeping them in a constant state of progressive repair is a good way to maintain a higher resting metabolism.

If you feel like listing the specific machines you have access to or enjoy and specifying how often you intend to do resistance training, I'd be happy to put together a more specific routine. And also, are you willing to give free weights, odd weights (i.e. sand bag), or calisthenics a try, or do you prefer the convenience of the machines? If you're only looking at two days per week, for example, you're probably better off doing full body workouts utilizing more comprehensive movements with a couple days of rest between. If you're wanting to hit the gym 6 days per week, then you could instead take better advantage of isolation exercises.

Hi yakherder,

Thanks for the answer.
I have pretty much every machine or other workout methods in there. It's a very big gym that tries to cater to every need so they have ... really more than any other gym I tried so far.
So from spinning, to rowing to machines, to bench pressing, ropes, weights, yoga, boxing,... everything really apart from a sauna or swimming pool.

Last time I really liked the rowing machine. I rowed for 10 minutes as well as I could (also walked for 10 minutes in a fast pace as I cannot run yet). I did some muscle stuff for the arms (trizeps, bizeps, and i think some chest muscles). I tried a thing that is supposed to train stomach muscles but it gave me pain in the back so I kinda left that alone.
Leg muscles I kinda have them trained well because I cycle so much. I cycle 30 minutes to work and 30 minutes back and also I walk the stairs pretty much always. So I thought I should have the rest of my body catch up with my legs which continue to cycle and climb stairs anyway? I don't know, happy about any input.
Now how much I play to go. Whenever possible, I want to do 3-4 days a week. So
Monday off (I have class after work so i cannot)
Tuesday workout
Wednesday there is a class at the gym I like
Thursday workout
Friday workout
sat & sun off
It's not a perfect schedule but it just doesn't fit in my week any other way. It might change slightly when my shift changes (that will be in April) but that is roughly the plan.
So for example today I couldn't (because i forgot to do the laundry so I had no gym clothes...) but tomorrow I will go before work as I have very late meetings. I am planning to do a light workout tomorrow morning because it is before work. And on Thursday I will try to go all in after work again.

First off, I apologize in advance if I go a little overboard. I can't help it. If it's more than you're looking for, feel free to trim off my recommendations as you see fit Big Grin

Is the class you take on Wednesday primarily cardio or endurance based? And how demanding is it? Are you s till relatively fresh immediately after the class? The day after the class?

Looking at your schedule, which includes 3 rest days in a row and 4 workout days in a row (counting your class as a workout day), here are a few things I'm considering before I lay out a tentative plan Tongue

• You'll want to have at least one, preferably two, strength training days where you lift relatively heavy weights. For these days you'll want to be well rested. That would make Tuesday ideal for sure. Whether or not your second one, should you choose to have it, comes on Thursday or Friday sort of depends on how fresh your Wednesday class leaves you. If it wears you out, then you're probably best off saving heavy lifting day #2 for Friday.

• You'll want to have a high intensity (HIIT, circuits, etc.) lower weight day, preferably two. It is not as necessary that you be as well rested for these as for your heavier lifting days, but they will definitely leave you tired if you're doing them right Smile For that reason, I generally do them on the days following my heavy lifting days, and preceding a rest day. With your schedule, I see a couple ways you could do it depending on where you want your focus and how fresh you're feeling after your class:
1. Make Thursday your 2nd strength training day and Friday your high intensity day.
2. Go immediately from your Wednesday class into a high intensity training session, focusing on muscle groups your class left out, then take it easy on Thursday and, on Friday, choose between another strength session or another high intensity session.
3. Make Thursday your high intensity day and take it easy Friday.

That said...

Strength training days:
• Use the heaviest amount of weight you can handle without breaking your form and do 4 to 8 reps in a single set before reaching muscle failure.
• Do 5 sets of each exercise (if you don't have time you can still make progress with 3 sets, but 5 is better).
• Rest at least two minutes and no more than 5 minutes between sets.

High intensity days (there are many different protocols, and they all work, but here's just one example):
• If this seems like a bit too much at the moment, think of completing a session as a mid to long term goal. If you have to rest more than listed below do it, but try to eventually get yourself to a point where you don't have to. Out of all the workout days, this is the one where willpower comes most into play. If you don't have to dig deep, you're not doing it right Big Grin
• Use enough weight that you can do 12 to 20 reps before reaching muscle failure.
• Options like the row machine or beating up a heavy bag can work here, too, but you should be doing it with enough intensity that you can't do it for more than a minute or two before moving on to the next exercise.
• Do multiple exercises in rapid succession as a single set, rather than just one exercise.
• After doing all exercises, rest anywhere from 45 seconds to 2 minutes.
• As above, 5 sets is best, 3 sets will still lead to results.

Rest(ish) days:
• Light cardio (half hour jog, slower pace on the row machine
• Skill progression (if there are any moves you're trying to get down, whether it be trying to perform a one legged squat or achieve the balance to do a handstand or something)
• Non gym activity, hiking, casual swim

I'm planning on adding more to this, as well as giving you some options to help build up to it if it's a bit much at the moment, but it's time to go pick up the kids from daycare. Tonight or tomorrow :/

If you'd like, you can take a look at the following article. It's WAY more nit picky than most people need, and it's geared towards experienced gym rats in their cutting phase, but it's worth a read if you want to understand some of the concepts at play in the game of cutting weight while gaining/maintaining strength.

https://www.t-nation.com/training/destroying-fat

'Murican Canadian
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30-03-2017, 05:01 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
Wow thanks yakherder! It sounds very good so far. I think tomorrow I will do a bit of cardio focussed workout with a little bit of muscle stuff and will probably have to skip Sat and Sun. I was going to make up for not being able to go this week yet but I am getting a tooth pulled on Saturday and afaik, heavy workout is not allowed after that. i will have to ask the doctor though.
Anyway, thanks so far. Looking forward to the added things that you promised.
Cheers

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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31-03-2017, 01:20 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
Alright, done for today.
10 min fast walking
10 min rowing machine
5 sets for shoulder and biceps/triceps
4 sets for belly muscles
5 sets leg press
15 min rowing machine
Feeling accomplished

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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31-03-2017, 01:33 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
You are accomplished.
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31-03-2017, 01:37 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
A quick thought... Being somewhat OCD in regards to my own routine, I tend to get carried away with the science behind the workouts. I figure if I'm going to put in the time, why not get as much out of it as I possibly can? That said, don't let the complexity of exercise science be discouraging. You can have a healthy diet and do 15 minutes of calisthenics 3 times per week and be in better shape than the healthiest 1% of the population or you can get all anal about your workouts in an effort to claw yourself to the top of that 1%. The important thing is to eat right and stay active, whether through a specific, data backed program or not. I feel that had to be said before I move on Big Grin

If you would prefer to just kind of wing it and not be pinned down to such a rigid routine, you could just keep a couple concepts loosely in mind as you hit the gym and decide what to do.

• In regards to weight loss, your diet is much more significant than your workout routine. Working out is great for many reasons. Just keep in mind, nonetheless, that you can control what you eat and never work out and still lose weight, but unless you're an Olympic athlete training 7 hours per day you will never out-work a bad diet.
• Maintain variety. Sometimes lift heavy weights with low reps, sometimes lift lighter weights with high reps.
• Don't feel the need to do crazy endurance sessions every time, but don't completely avoid them either. The growth hormones triggered by such intensity stimulate muscle development, especially in conjunction with regular heavy lifting sessions. Stronger muscles = higher resting metabolism.
• If there are specific exercises you enjoy, find a way to include them in your routines even if they aren't a perfect fit. You mentioned the rowing machine, for example. On strength training days, do extremely short sets at maximal effort. If you're not feeling up to a strength training session or a high intensity endurance session, then do it for 10 minutes at a more relaxed pace.
• Start simple so you don't discourage yourself, but make a point to add new tools as you go. At this point you might prefer machines, but don't be afraid to start learning to use free weights. It can be intimidating since there always seems to be an ass hole crowd ready to give you dirty looks when you do it wrong, which is less of an issue with machines designed for a specific and usually obvious movement, but it's worth learning because there are valuable compound exercises that are hard to replicate elsewhere. I'd suggest starting with the Romanian Deadlift which, even as a calisthenics / homemade equipment nerd, is one of the few conventional lifts I find to be beneficial enough to make an exception for. Look it up on youtube. Start with kettle ball Romanian deadlifts, then dumbbell Romanian deadlifts, then eventually barbell Romanian deadlifts. Once you've got the movement down as a skill, you can begin throwing it into routines. Then move on and find another useful movement to tackle and add to your toolbox.
• On that note... Don't overlook calisthenics. One of the weaknesses of a conventional gym is that you don't usually have the whole place reserved for yourself, and that makes it more inconvenient to put together complex interval training routines utilizing multiple lifts. That becomes irrelevant when all you need is your own bodyweight. And contrary to what iron junkies might tell you, you will never outgrow calisthenics. There are always variations you can use to increase (or decrease) the difficulty for any muscle group. As with freeweights, you can think of them as skills to be acquired over time and learn new techniques one by one.

If you don't feel like concerning yourself with all the strength vs endurance nonsense at the moment and would rather just keep it simple, here's another quick and easy schedule you could follow that would be more than sufficient with whatever weights you choose to go with, provided each set brings you to or near muscle failure and you do multiple sets:

Tuesday:
1. bench press (free weights or machine) or pushups
2. overhead pull down machine or horizontal pulls
3. Squats (machine or just wear a heavy backpack)
4. Hamstring curl (machine or stability ball)
You can either perform all 4 in a row as a single set if you're up to it and have the equipment available, or do your 3 to 5 sets of each individual exercise before moving on to the next. Doing them all as a single set is obviously the more time efficient option and will allow you to get a pretty good cardio workout while simultaneously giving individual muscle groups a chance to recover for a few minutes before moving on to the next set.

Wednesday:
Your class(es) of choice

Thursday:
1. Overhead press (free weights or machine) or pike push-ups
2. Curls (machine or barbells) or anything else focusing on biceps
3. Squats
4. Bench dips or any machine that focuses on triceps
Same set/rest protocol as Tuesday

Friday:
1. Light conditioning of your choice
2. 5 sets of anything targeting the core

Saturday, Sunday, Monday
Though these are your rest days, you might throw in some light calisthenics on Sunday if you have time and feel up to it. It could be as simple as doing a few pushups or planks throughout the day or going through some warm-up stretches.

And if you do want to get more specific, then as per one of the examples in my above post:

Tuesday:
1. Full body maximal strength training session (heavy weights, low reps, 2 to 5 minute rest between sets, 3 to 5 sets)
2. Power exercises (i.e. high intensity, short duration on the row machine)

Wednesday:
Class

Thursday
1. Maximal strength training session as on Tuesday, but focusing only on muscles not still fatigued or sore from your Wednesday class or your Tuesday session.
2. Power exercises

Friday
1. Endurance training (less weight, higher reps, 45 seconds to 2 minute rest between sets, 3 to 5 sets)
2. If you can handle it, whether within a few minutes after your primary workout or later in the day, a half hour jog or brisk walk.

Saturday, Sunday, Monday
Same as with the other routine. 3 days is quite a long rest period, so feel free to break it up any way you see fit.

If you have any questions, want to simplify it even further, or even make it more complex to squeeze out just a little more efficiency, or if you decide you'd like to start learning some calisthenics movements so you don't have to be reliant on a gym, feel free to ask. I'm always looking for an excuse to run my mouth about fitness related stuff.

'Murican Canadian
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31-03-2017, 02:39 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
Thanks for all the information, yakherder.
I think I will try to follow your advice in your above post for a while and see
Also I decided to do one of those stupid timelapse videos Big Grin So I made a photo after my workout and I will make one after each workout. In a few months, I will put them together and see the timeline how I changed.

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31-03-2017, 02:58 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
Getting ready to do another HIIT cardio vid. Wish me luck. XD
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31-03-2017, 03:31 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
(31-03-2017 01:20 PM)Leerob Wrote:  Alright, done for today.
10 min fast walking
10 min rowing machine
5 sets for shoulder and biceps/triceps
4 sets for belly muscles
5 sets leg press
15 min rowing machine
Feeling accomplished

Excellent!! Cool

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31-03-2017, 03:33 PM
RE: Atheists who work out
(31-03-2017 02:58 PM)Larai19 Wrote:  Getting ready to do another HIIT cardio vid. Wish me luck. XD

Wishing you luck! Have a great workout!

Yesterday, I ran about 6 miles, it was just ok...I didn't have my phone with me, so ran with no music. Angry I ran near a lake, and it was peaceful, but still... no music can be tough some days. Sadcryface

HAPPY FRIDAY! Heart

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