Atrocious Fiction Books
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09-07-2013, 06:01 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
(08-07-2013 07:15 PM)ridethespiral Wrote:  
(08-07-2013 06:34 PM)slydog Wrote:  I can't read anything by Stephen King. The only book I was able to read was Pet Semetary, and even then I skipped the majority of the book just to get to the end. I just can't stand the way he writes. I tried to read Cujo and just couldn't. It was way too dry.

I like the idea behind Twilight, the story and characters, but the writing was not great at all. It was too short, didn't go into detail on many of the characters' stories, needed more robust language, etc. The writing sucked.

Other than that, I really can't think of a particular book I absolutely hated. I just love to read so I am not incredibly picky unless the book is really slow and drones on for fifty pages.

I was a Steven King fan as a kid but in retrospect he had a few gems and a bunch of mediocre stuff otherwise. 'Misery' is probably his best IMO (but the movie w/ Kathy Bates is almost verbatim), I read 'The Stand' as an open reading assignment in 8th grade, because it was what I felt like reading...What a huge mistake just from a sheer volume prospective, I finished the book at midnight the day it was due and handed the teacher a broken figure made with play-dough and toothpicks (the creative portion of the assignment) and said something like "It was over 800 pages and I read it all."

He writes everything like it will be made into a TV miniseries...because everything that he writes is made into a TV miniseries.

I tried to read It, but just couldn't get into it. I love books that are very long, that way it takes me more than an evening to read, but I just couldn't stand the incredibly long descriptions. It seemed like he would describe a room for thirty pages, but when a big thing happened it was like "oh and this happened....moving on!".

I liked the movie Pet Semetary more than I liked the book. The little boy was just creepy.
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05-08-2013, 02:29 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
(20-06-2013 12:39 PM)Atheist_pilgrim Wrote:  Was disappointed by "The Passage" by Justin Cronin, "Under the Dome" by Stephen King, and especially "The Night Eternal" by Guillermo Del Toro. Couldn't finish the first two due to funky characters and plot issues, and simply hated the last one for demolishing what was a good trilogy.

I'm with you on The Night Eternal thing. Love the first two - The Strain and The Fall - but the third one sucked. Mostly because Eph's character was suddenly the bane of everyone's existence. He was my favorite character, too. Weeping

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05-08-2013, 04:28 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
(17-06-2013 02:51 PM)AyameTan Wrote:  What was the worst fiction book you've ever read? I finished Wizard's First Rule last year, and it was the dullest fantasy I've ever come across. Nothing was original. Run-on sentences were a blessing. Chapters dragged for dozens of pages and what could have been explained in six words was spelled out in excruciating tedium.

Here's a more detailed analysis:

http://www.amazon.com/review/RENERY611CA...hisHelpful

Quote:This book is long winded and dull. To make things worse, it's difficult to follow at times. Goodkind must know this, as several pages after a major event a truncated description is offered for certain scenes. A case in point is the initial confrontation between Richard, Kahlan and the quad in chapter 2. On the same topic, I literally rolled my eyes when the villains were described as having "blonde hair and blue eyes." Great. This is obviously going to be a retelling of World War 2. There are a few mildly interesting philosophical dissertations thrown in, and I did find Richard and Kahlan to be fairly interesting. They were given adequate pages for exposition. Unfortunately, these are not constants; some philosophical conclusions are less than what one could expect in an introductory college course. "Power is neither good nor evil, it's the user who determines it." Well, duh. The writing is so dull at times as Goodkind spells everything out in minute detail for the reader. Dozens of pages are wasted on explaining what anyone with a primary school education could figure out. The "betrayal" is so obvious that anyone who hasn't fallen asleep during the first quarter of this book would have seen it coming about 500 pages ahead of time. The "big" reveal about Kahlan's true nature is a prime example. At least the final revelations were wrapped up fairly quickly.

An extremely gruesome and gratuitously brutal scene of child sacrifice takes up close to a dozen pages (of microscopic font). Not only is this a terrible use of prose and a run-on chapter, but it is likely to turn away even the most ardent BDSM practitioner. Scenes of such brutality are the author's right to wax poetic about, certainly, but to do so in such detail adds nothing to the plot, throws the pace of the novel into a quagmire and will likely nauseate most readers. I had to skim ahead to spare myself the grotesque horror of this scene.

Unfortunately, the wise old wizard and evil villain are more one-dimensional than Emperor Palpatine. There's no reason to care about their motives or goals. The plot is hardly better, essentially ripped from The Lord of the Rings in whole cloth. The villain seeks three boxes of power, one of which will extinguish all life, one of which will claim his life, and one of which will grant him eternal power over life and death. The heroes must stop him, but not before 400 pages or so of wandering around while we are introduced to the various peoples of the world. None of these are very interesting. The Mud People are a tribe of hunter-gatherers, stuck in their ways and unwilling to embrace modernity because of one particularly stubborn elder who wields an incommensurate degree of power. And there's even a clone of Gollum to boot.

Queen Milena and her daughter Violet are the evil stepmother and stepsister of the book. They enjoy tormenting people (innocent orphan Rachel among them) while serving as an example of the evils and horrors of communism (I guess Goodkind was fond of Ann Rand, too). The protagonist gets tortured for about 100 pages and gratuitous violence is thrown in, for what purpose I have no idea, but it didn't make reading this wall of text any easier or more fun.

There are a few elements that are thrown in toward the end, such as the terror of ancient prophecies. I honestly cannot see them as anything other than gimmicks for readers to continue reading the tale, but after 800 pages of microscopic text, I would rather tear my fingernails out than subject myself to this experience again.

And here is Read-Weep's take on it:

http://read-weep.com/#!/episode.php/wizards-first-rule

The second worst novel I've read was The Power of One by Bryce Courtnay. It was nothing more than an attempt to paint Caucasians as the saviours of native Africans. The protagonist is a Gary Stu and therefore painfully boring to read about.

The moment I read the title of this thread, this series came to mind.

I listened to 4-5 of his audiobooks on my drive to work last year (it was something to make the 45 minute drive go by faster), and that book is probably the best he has to offer. He has some cool concepts, but many of them just end up being immature garbage because of how he fleshes them out. He likes to create creatures, use them one time, and then you never hear of them again.

His penchant for writing about violence and torture make him seem like a seriously disturbed individual. He covers everything to murdering and beating children to rape to burning people alive, all in great detail. He also likes to add political messages, but they're so unsubtle and sometimes unrealistic that it just comes off as stupid.

Goodkind is also a severe douche. Anyone who says his books suck are met with "You're too young to understand" rhetoric. I guess he's not bad for a dyslexic author, but that doesn't change the over-all value of his stuff.

“One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision.”

- Bertrand Russel
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05-08-2013, 04:51 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
The House Of Night series
By PC and Kristen Cast

Zoey Redbird was the worst protagonist ever! She would not shut the fuck up about how she was part Cherokee Native American. Well guess what as far US Census is concerned you're WHITE ZOEY! Then the hypocritical little bitch cheated on her alcholic boyfriend literally 5 other guys and had the nerve to repeatedly call some else a slut just because their clothes were a bit more revealing. Oh and and the other person was virgin. And the homophobic/ biphobic dumbo uses her gay "friends" as fashion accessories. This leads me to believe all the writers knows of gay men comes from television. Oh and the rape makes people psycho plot is disgusting and demeaning to rape victims. I'm not sure why writers keep using as an excuse to make villains. It's boring also as a back story.
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05-08-2013, 05:16 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
(05-08-2013 04:28 PM)eksyte Wrote:  
(17-06-2013 02:51 PM)AyameTan Wrote:  What was the worst fiction book you've ever read? I finished Wizard's First Rule last year, and it was the dullest fantasy I've ever come across. Nothing was original. Run-on sentences were a blessing. Chapters dragged for dozens of pages and what could have been explained in six words was spelled out in excruciating tedium.

Here's a more detailed analysis:

http://www.amazon.com/review/RENERY611CA...hisHelpful


And here is Read-Weep's take on it:

http://read-weep.com/#!/episode.php/wizards-first-rule

The second worst novel I've read was The Power of One by Bryce Courtnay. It was nothing more than an attempt to paint Caucasians as the saviours of native Africans. The protagonist is a Gary Stu and therefore painfully boring to read about.

The moment I read the title of this thread, this series came to mind.

I listened to 4-5 of his audiobooks on my drive to work last year (it was something to make the 45 minute drive go by faster), and that book is probably the best he has to offer. He has some cool concepts, but many of them just end up being immature garbage because of how he fleshes them out. He likes to create creatures, use them one time, and then you never hear of them again.

His penchant for writing about violence and torture make him seem like a seriously disturbed individual. He covers everything to murdering and beating children to rape to burning people alive, all in great detail. He also likes to add political messages, but they're so unsubtle and sometimes unrealistic that it just comes off as stupid.

Goodkind is also a severe douche. Anyone who says his books suck are met with "You're too young to understand" rhetoric. I guess he's not bad for a dyslexic author, but that doesn't change the over-all value of his stuff.

Lol those books. I read like 3 or 4 of em. They where pretty shitty and got progressively shittier but they where super easy to read on audio book so I digested a few of them (at the time I was commuting 3:00 a day so I was just ripping through shit fantasy novels). Lol at the pain dildo things...I was listening and going "Did he describe what I think he did?" The show was even worse though.

The 'Recluse series' is okay if you like cheap and easy fantasy, at least Modesitt invented a cool magic system...but the books can be real slow (entire chapters about woodworking for instance)

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07-08-2013, 04:57 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
Books 3 and 4 (and somewhat 2) of the Ender Saga were so damn boring. Ender's Game was awesome and Speaker for the Dead was so-so. The Author (Orson Scott Card) is also a dick.
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07-08-2013, 05:00 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
(07-08-2013 04:57 PM)T3hhippie Wrote:  Books 3 and 4 (and somewhat 2) of the Ender Saga were so damn boring. Ender's Game was awesome and Speaker for the Dead was so-so. The Author (Orson Scott Card) is also a dick.

Lol yes... Enders game was awesome, speaker was decent... I dunno why he didn't write more about the guys who communicate through DNA directly.

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07-08-2013, 05:24 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
I want to toss out two literary "classics" that I think are atrocious so you can beat me up a little...

The Sound and The Fury... Maybe I'm stupid, but no thanks. Yes I read it all the way through. Don't remember much of it except that by the end I knew I was reading it just out of solidarity for my high school daughter.

AND

Don Quixote - Just didn't get it...

I've never read the whole Bible. A LOT of people say it's a great one, though! LOL
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07-08-2013, 11:12 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
(07-08-2013 05:24 PM)Regular_Joe Wrote:  Don Quixote - Just didn't get it...

I tried this once. Couldn't get into it. I think it had a big impact at the time because of the context. The whole book (apparently, since I didn't read it) was a bit of a sarcastic attack on the gentle knight/fair lady medieval romances which were the popular literature of the day. I think most of the humour is lost on us because we're not steeped in all the tales that he references.
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07-08-2013, 11:24 PM
RE: Atrocious Fiction Books
The Education of Mary: A Little Miss of Color by Anne Rinaldi

This woman completely misconstrued entire historical events! No black person in the history of EVER wanted to be whipped for penance! WTF! Colorism, what the hell does she think she knows about Colorism. Nothing! That's what! Has she ever met any teenager before? Teenagers don't do this operatic weirdness. Did she talk to a single black person to gain insight before writing it in first person? Obviously not. This is just awful.
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