Australian faked brain cancer to claim "lifestyle cure"
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06-05-2016, 03:14 AM
Australian faked brain cancer to claim "lifestyle cure"
Belle Gibson, the wellness blogger who reportedly faked brain cancer to her hundreds of thousands of followers, is facing legal action in Australia over “deceptive conduct” after an investigation by a consumer watchdog.

Gibson, who lives in Melbourne, launched a recipe and lifestyle app, The Whole Pantry, on the back of her claim that she had been able to cure her terminal illness through diet and lifestyle changes. She also published a book of recipes by Penguin.

In March last year doubts were cast on her cancer diagnosis in 1999 at the age of 20 after it emerged that she had been born in October 1991.

http://www.theguardian.com/australia-new...WEML6619I2

What sort of person does this????

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Excreta Tauri Sapientam Fulgeat (The excrement of the bull causes wisdom to flee)
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06-05-2016, 03:25 AM
RE: Australian faked brain cancer to claim "lifestyle cure"
Quote:In a separate action, Penguin Publishing will have to pay the Victorian consumer law fund $30,000 for failing to fact-check Gibson’s book.

It will also have to include a “prominent warning notice” on all books that contain claims about natural therapies in future, as well as “enhance its compliance, education and training program” with a view to ensuring that claims about medical conditions are substantiated.

Cohen said the publisher had willingly cooperated with the investigation and agreed to the enforceable undertaking.

“This is an important step in ensuring that consumers receive only verified information and are not deceived, particularly where serious matters of health and medical treatment are concerned.”

This could have huge implications. I hope the rest of the world follows Australia's lead on this - it'll put every so-called health guru out of business Smile

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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06-05-2016, 03:47 AM
RE: Australian faked brain cancer to claim "lifestyle cure"
In the UK the 1939 Cancer Act places a blanket ban on advertising cancer treatments to the general public.

To paraphrase the legal stuff, section four of the Act says:

Nobody (including limited companies) can publish any advert – meaning a notice, circular, label, wrapper or other document, or any announcement made orally or by any means of producing or transmitting sounds – aimed at the public, offering to treat anyone for cancer, to prescribe any treatments for the disease, or to give advice in connection to cancer treatment.
If they do, they could be convicted, fined and/or imprisoned for up to three months.

They can avoid this fate by proving that their advertisement is not aimed at the public, but instead at members of Parliament or the House of Lords, local authorities or governing bodies of voluntary hospitals (those founded and run by charities); registered medical practitioners, nurses or pharmacists (or anyone training to be one of those); that the advert was in a technical publication aimed at any of those people; or that they didn’t know it was being published at all.

There’s also a get-out clause for adverts published by local authorities and voluntary hospitals themselves, and for any person acting “with the sanction of the Minister [of Health].”

Implicit in the term ‘advertisement’ is that there is a financial incentive: a person or company is selling something (whether it’s an actual treatment or regime, or advice about treating the disease) claiming to treat cancer.

In some cases, figuring out whether an advert has breached the Cancer Act is fairly simple, and it’s easy to tell whether an advert is offering a cancer cure for sale or not. But sometimes things are a bit murkier, especially if what’s on offer is advice and information rather than treatments. And the Act makes no distinction between therapies that are supported by scientific evidence, bogus quackery, or anything else in between. It’s purely about whether someone is advertising a treatment for cancer or not.

However, the Cancer Act isn’t the only legal protection on offer for patients and the public, and it’s here that other, broader laws come in – principally the Consumer Protection From Unfair Trading Regulations, 2008, which supersede much of the 1939 Act. This legislation is designed to prevent people and companies from: “Falsely claiming that a product is able to cure illnesses, dysfunction, or malformations.”

The invisible and the non-existent look very much alike
Excreta Tauri Sapientam Fulgeat (The excrement of the bull causes wisdom to flee)
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06-05-2016, 06:01 AM
RE: Australian faked brain cancer to claim "lifestyle cure"
Belle Gibson? Laugh out load

Don't let those gnomes and their illusions get you down. They're just gnomes and illusions.

--Jake the Dog, Adventure Time

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