Autism
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20-06-2012, 05:56 PM
Autism
This is more of a request. My little brother has autism, and when he learned from my family I didn't believe in God he just couldn't believe it. Is there any way to get an autistic person to understand that other people have different viewpoints? He doesn't seem to be able to cope with that fact, and none of the medical places I've looked at give an answer. I don't like him growing up not understanding this simple fact.
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20-06-2012, 07:26 PM
RE: Autism
Good question, but I'm assuming you know from experience more about autism than many of us here. Isn't one characteristic of the disorder the lack of ability to completely relate to other people? I would assume it would be a difficult task for your brother to assimilate abstract information about what goes on in the minds of other people. It may not be something you can easily communicate. I would imagine your best shot is to show him through your actions that you're still the same brother you've always been. In my Christian life, it was common to say goofy stuff like, "Let others see Jesus through your deeds." You can turn that around and show your brother being an atheist doesn't mean you worship the devil. You might eat the occasional baby, sure, but no devil worship allowed!

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
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20-06-2012, 09:13 PM
RE: Autism
Yes, actually, it is. You have to show him things by example. Let me give you an example: he's been bullied at school, so now he's never going to bully. He only learns the way other people feel by it being felt by him. That's the only way we can teach him morals. You yell at him once, he's never gonna yell at anyone again. So, yeah, the best way is to show him that acceptance makes him feel good, so he'll understand in general that it makes others feel good... That's sound logic, correct?
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20-06-2012, 09:24 PM
RE: Autism
That is tough; how to approach depends on how functioning he is.

Your beliefs do not make you a better person, your behavior does.
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20-06-2012, 09:43 PM
RE: Autism
He's gotten better, but it's still difficult communicating with him.
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21-06-2012, 03:11 AM
RE: Autism
ok, I would never have thought that I would ever be the one saying this but:
Autism is not an illness or disease, so you do not "have" autism but you *are* autist. It is a condition you are born with, kind of a wrong wiring in the brain, you can't cure it, but with therapy and so on you can enable autistic people to live an almost normal live.
Fact is they need to learn that they are autists and what this means for them.
As there are lots of different degrees of autism there is never a recipe that works the same for everyone.
So in your case, he is obviously able to understand things if they are brought on to him in the right manner. He has to feel the emotion you want him to understand. Shows me (at least from what you say) that he is able to learn a lot of things because emotions are normally the most difficult things for autists.

You could try to approach it from another point.
He has been risen to believe in God. You can tell him about other countries and what they believe there (go for things that are very obviously different like the elephant god with many arms, about northern myths and gods, about fairies and leprechauns etc), and that a lot of people here do believe the things that people from other countries believe, because they like it better. And once he understood this you can tell them that there are also people who do not believe in anything, and that you are one of these people.
Maybe you even get so far as to make him understand the difference between believing things and looking for proof that the things that you believe are accurate. But that might be difficult and will very much depend on his age and the decree of his autism.

I hope this helps

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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21-06-2012, 03:56 AM
RE: Autism
Already knew it wasn't a disease. Tongue

But, yes, that does help and it's an idea I haven't yet thought of. Thanks for the assistance!
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21-06-2012, 04:44 AM
RE: Autism
Not "normal".... "neuro-typical" is preferred.
Cheers.

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21-06-2012, 05:25 AM
RE: Autism
One of my best friends is an aspie and I've interacted with autistic people a few times. I've found that analogies are sometimes the easiest way at explaining things to people. In this case, since many aspies and autistic types are very technical people, a technical explanation may be best.

For instance... many of us who are atheists tend to use the... "If it can be explained without a creator, the necessity for a creator is not required." argument.

Find a technical example of something that is intertwined but easily explained. Then use the god of the gaps argument on it. Then explain it without the god of the gaps argument. This may help them understand the example of what it feels like since this may be something that is a foreign concept to them.

Example:

"Do you understand what a star is? It's a ball of gas, right? How did it get there?"

See if they can explain the technical way a star gets to be what it is, or how stars are formed. Then ask, "So did you require god to explain how the star formed? It was formed through gas, pressure, gravity and so on, right? But you were able to explain that without having to put god into that." but in playing the devil's advocate, "But you can also see how I could also say that if I didn't understand it, that I could say that god did it, and that is how things are made, or explains why people think they need god, right?"

This could engage both sides of the brain because you are explaining things in a sense that you are trying to get them to engage memory and things they have learned, recollection of things that are technical and then you are then asking them to engage the emotional part of their brain (things like religion, god of the gaps, etc) to then re-explain something they just explained to you. This might possibly help them understand a bit better.

Then again it may not, it will really depend on the person. I've met some that are very adaptive thinkers and I've met others that are very heavily autistic.

One must remember that these people are usually VERY intelligent but have a different way of thinking than neurotypical types as DLJ has kindly pointed out. I would remind you though that because these are not neurotypical traits that things that disrupt their daily routine can be VERY uncomfortable for them, potentially even harmful to their daily routine. This is more of a post for people who may not interact with them normally. You are his brother so you're obviously aware of these things. I wish you the best of luck either way.
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21-06-2012, 05:52 AM
RE: Autism
(20-06-2012 05:56 PM)zeldamaster17 Wrote:  My little brother has autism
(21-06-2012 03:56 AM)zeldamaster17 Wrote:  Already knew it wasn't a disease. Tongue
This statement is why I said it isn't a disease. Because you *have* a disease. Your brother doesn't have autism, he is autist.

(21-06-2012 05:25 AM)Logisch Wrote:  One must remember that these people are usually VERY intelligent but have a different way of thinking than neurotypical types as DLJ has kindly pointed out.
I am not sure about that. Yes, asperger autists might, but not every autist and I am positive that not "usually". I have read and heard about enough cases where they are not "VERY intelligent". Maybe they are average and the only thing is that they are not neuro typical (thanks for pointing this out, didn't know how else to express it but with "normal").

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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