Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
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24-07-2013, 05:15 PM
Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
I had someone ask me recently for examples how the Universe and humans are poorly designed for life and functionality, so in the span of a few hours I put together a list 5 pages long of examples and sent them over to him.

Looking back on this I am amazed at how much an apologist would have to twist themselves into a pretzel trying to justify all of this with an Intelligent Designer yet how seamlessly and elegantly Natural Selection and Physics explains it.

Enjoy!

Examples of Poor Design

COSMIC

- Universe is better set up to be a galaxy and black hole graveyard than a generator of life

- Most places in the universe will kill you instantly, cold, heat, radiation, micrometeoroid impacts, black holes, etc.

- Our own twin planet to Earth, Venus, has clouds of CO2 and sulfuric acid, 980°F surface temperatures, and an atmospheric pressure over 90x greater than that found on Earth, which would kill us instantly if we lived there.

- Less than 3% of all hydrogen gas in stellar nurseries will ever become a star.

- Many stars are simply to large, too volatile, or too unstable to allow life to prosper. Solar Flares and Mega Flares could wipe out nearby planets. Excessively large stars can go supernovae (gargantuan thermonuclear explosions in space), producing gamma ray bursts which obliterate their entire solar system and neighboring star systems with them.

- Even stable stars like our Sun age and slowly die. As they do, their heat output slowly increases. Our sun has completed about 5 billion years of its estimated 10 billion year life cycle. In approx 2 billion years, it will be hot enough to boil off the earth’s oceans. In approx 4 billion, it will swell up into a Red Giant, immolating Mercury, Venus and Earth in the process.

- The remnants of our solar system’s Accretion Disk have become a virtual shooting gallery; planets have been peppered with large comet and asteroid impacts, which are believed to have been responsible for at least one mass extinction event on Earth.

- Planetary orbits are unstable over long time periods causing planets to either drift toward or away from the stars they orbit, which could create condition unsuitable for life.

- Galaxies will often collide into other galaxies. Our own galaxy, the Milky Way, is on a collision course with the Andromeda galaxy, which will take place in about 7 billion years from now.

THE NATURAL WORLD ON EARTH; HARDLY A GARDEN OF EDEN

- 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered in oceans and undrinkable salt water.

- Of that remaining 30 percent that is dry land, only half of that is habitable by humans. The other half are deserts and frigid arctic tundra which is unsuitable.

- Fragile life forms are threatened by all kinds of natural phenomena.
Tornadoes
Floods
Wildfires
Hurricanes/typhoons
Lightning
Volcanic eruptions
Earthquakes and tsunamis,
Change in climate and weather patterns
Droughts
Blizzards
Continental drift
Reversal of the Earth’s magnetic field
Sandstorms
UV radiation / X-rays / cosmic rays
Freezing and scorching temperatures.
Poisonous gases in our atmosphere CO2, CO, Ra, etc.

POOR DESIGN OF LIFE ON EARTH

- Most organisms contain redundant DNA or RNA which is not necessary for them to function. Humans contain fish and reptilian DNA and retroviral fragments from those same species whose expression has been repressed as introns. 80% of the human genome is introns.

- African Locusts have nerve cells which start in the abdomen but are connected to the wing.

- Pandas use an enlarged radial sesamoid bones from grasping objects as opposed to having a dedicated thumb, as do primates.

- Orchid flowers have complicated reproductive devices made from an aggregate of structures used on other flowers for other purposes.

- Virtually all plants and animals can synthesize Vitamin C, but humans cannot, resulting in scurvy and death if they do not receive it from the food they eat.

- The RuBiSCO enzyme used for carbon fixation in plants is extremely inefficient and has a poor ability to differentiate between O2 of CO2 molecules. Plants must make very large quantities of this enzyme to compensate for this deficiency.

- Dandelions possess sex organs, yet reproduce asexually.

- The circuitous routing of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve, which runs from the brain, loops around the Aortic Arch before heading to the Larynx. In giraffes, this feature has over 20 feet of nerve length which is unnecessary for function.

- The breathing reflex is unconsciously stimulated by the presence of CO2, a poisonous gas, and not by O2, the gas required for animals to live.

- Endothermic (warm blooded) animals are extremely energy inefficient; a single chicken which could feed a human for 1 day could feed a full grown alligator for 1 month, since it is not wasting energy to regulate its core body temperature.

- Bats possess dense mammalian bones not adapted for flight while flightless ostriches and penguins still retain their light hollow avian bones better suited to a flying animal. Speaking of which, why do Ostriches, Penguins, Kiwi, etc even NEED wings, since they don’t fly?

- The Blind Fish Astyanax Mexicanus still possesses vestigial eyes, yet lives in total darkness where sight is not necessary.

- Many animals possess vestigial structures which serve no functional purpose – think dew claws in dogs, hip bones and hind legs in whales, etc.

- Medusa jellyfish and hydra are biologically immortal yet most animals, including God’s chosen humans, are not.

THE HUMAN RACE

- Humans both breathe and consume food and water through the Pharynx. This ensures a portion of us will choke to death each year while eating or drinking. This is not a problem in some of our mammalian cousins like dolphins and whales, who have separated respiration and digestive tracts.

- The female reproductive system will occasionally implant a fertilized egg in the fallopian tube, or outside the uterus in the abdominal cavity, resulting in an ectopic pregnancy. This almost always results in the death of the mother and child if the pregnancy is not terminated immediately.

- During birth, women must push the baby out through their pelvis. If the head of the baby is too large, it will not squeeze through and usually results in the death of the mother and child prior to the development of caesarian section surgery.

- Male testicles develop in the abdominal cavity, then descend into the scrotum. If this is impinged, they can become impacted, gangrene, and kill the male.

- Humans can be born breech (feet first) which can asphyxiate the baby if it is not removed from the womb quickly.

- During labor or birth, the umbilical cord, which supplies the baby nourishment, can become wrapped around the neck, strangling the baby to death, if not removed quickly.

- The prostate gland is prone to swelling as we age. As it encircles the urethra and lies next to the bladder, this swelling can affect our ability to urinate freely and reduce effective bladder capacity.

- We have extremely weak teeth which are prone to decay. Serious tooth decay can cause blood borne infections which are fatal. It is believed this was the most common form of death in prehistoric humans. We only get one set of permanent teeth which have a tendency to fall out in old age and are not replaced. By contrast a Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) regrows all of its teeth every 10 days!

- Our knees and elbows are held together with ligaments and are easy to tear or wear out. This is a crippling injury when it happens.

- We have benign vestigial features that are useless to us.
Tonsils
Hymen
Ear Muscles
Nipples and breast tissue in human males
Coccyx (tailbone)
Erector Pilli (Goosebumps)
Whiskers
Various Skeletal Musculatures
Occipitalis Minor of the Head
The palmaris longus muscle of the Arm
The levator claviculae muscle of the Neck
The pyramidalis muscle of the abdomen
The plantaris muscle of the leg
Vestigial behaviors - The palmar grasp reflex in infants.

- Some vestigial features can cause medical problems and even life threatening complications
Wisdom Teeth (Third Molar)
Appendix

- The human eye has blind spots due to the placement of the optic nerve in the field of vision plus the concentrations of light sensitive cells (rods and cones) over the surface of the retina.

- Though we can sense reds and greens like other primates, human eyesight is relatively poor in terms of visual acuity. Octopi see better than we do. A peregrine falcon (Falco Peregrinus) can hit dive speeds greater than 230 mph and all the time it can keep a single vole in the middle of a wheat field in razor sharp focus.

- The eye is prone to changing shape as we age, causing blurriness in our vision.

- The cornea is prone to the formation of cataracts

- All images captured by the retina are inverted. They must be rotated 180° when the image is processed by the optic centers of the brain.

- We have relatively poor night vision and see best out of the periphery of our field of view in low light, since this is where the greatest concentration of rods are on the retina. By contrast, a African lion (Panthera Leo) has low light vision on par with Generation IV night vision equipment.

- Our lungs are very inefficient at extracting oxygen from the air. Birds have much more efficient lungs. Because of this, some Asian species of geese have been know to fly at altitudes in excess of 20,000 ft ASL.

- We can only see a small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Insects can see in infrared and ultraviolet sections of the electromagnetic spectrum as well.

- Our olfactory senses are extremely limited when compared with those of, say, a wolf (Canis Lupus).

- We do not have the ability to regenerate severed limbs, unlike lizards, which can regrow their tails or starfish, which can regrow their entire body from a single severed limb.

- Malfunctioning genes or multiple copies of genes or chromosomes cause over 5000 genetic disorders in humans, including Down’s Syndrome and Lou Gehrig’s Disease.


"IN THRUST WE TRUST"

"We were conservative Jews and that meant we obeyed God's Commandments until His rules became a royal pain in the ass."

- Joel Chastnoff, The 188th Crybaby Brigade
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24-07-2013, 05:34 PM (This post was last modified: 24-07-2013 07:26 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
(24-07-2013 05:15 PM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  I had someone ask me recently for examples how the Universe and humans are poorly designed for life and functionality, so in the span of a few hours I put together a list 5 pages long of examples and sent them over to him.

Looking back on this I am amazed at how much an apologist would have to twist themselves into a pretzel trying to justify all of this with an Intelligent Designer yet how seamlessly and elegantly Natural Selection and Physics explains it.

Enjoy!

Examples of Poor Design

COSMIC

- Universe is better set up to be a galaxy and black hole graveyard than a generator of life

- Most places in the universe will kill you instantly, cold, heat, radiation, micrometeoroid impacts, black holes, etc.

- Our own twin planet to Earth, Venus, has clouds of CO2 and sulfuric acid, 980°F surface temperatures, and an atmospheric pressure over 90x greater than that found on Earth, which would kill us instantly if we lived there.

- Less than 3% of all hydrogen gas in stellar nurseries will ever become a star.

- Many stars are simply to large, too volatile, or too unstable to allow life to prosper. Solar Flares and Mega Flares could wipe out nearby planets. Excessively large stars can go supernovae (gargantuan thermonuclear explosions in space), producing gamma ray bursts which obliterate their entire solar system and neighboring star systems with them.

- Even stable stars like our Sun age and slowly die. As they do, their heat output slowly increases. Our sun has completed about 5 billion years of its estimated 10 billion year life cycle. In approx 2 billion years, it will be hot enough to boil off the earth’s oceans. In approx 4 billion, it will swell up into a Red Giant, immolating Mercury, Venus and Earth in the process.

- The remnants of our solar system’s Accretion Disk have become a virtual shooting gallery; planets have been peppered with large comet and asteroid impacts, which are believed to have been responsible for at least one mass extinction event on Earth.

- Planetary orbits are unstable over long time periods causing planets to either drift toward or away from the stars they orbit, which could create condition unsuitable for life.

- Galaxies will often collide into other galaxies. Our own galaxy, the Milky Way, is on a collision course with the Andromeda galaxy, which will take place in about 7 billion years from now.

THE NATURAL WORLD ON EARTH; HARDLY A GARDEN OF EDEN

- 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered in oceans and undrinkable salt water.

- Of that remaining 30 percent that is dry land, only half of that is habitable by humans. The other half are deserts and frigid arctic tundra which is unsuitable.

- Fragile life forms are threatened by all kinds of natural phenomena.
Tornadoes
Floods
Wildfires
Hurricanes/typhoons
Lightning
Volcanic eruptions
Earthquakes and tsunamis,
Change in climate and weather patterns
Droughts
Blizzards
Continental drift
Reversal of the Earth’s magnetic field
Sandstorms
UV radiation / X-rays / cosmic rays
Freezing and scorching temperatures.
Poisonous gases in our atmosphere CO2, CO, Ra, etc.

POOR DESIGN OF LIFE ON EARTH

- Most organisms contain redundant DNA or RNA which is not necessary for them to function. Humans contain fish and reptilian DNA and retroviral fragments from those same species whose expression has been repressed as introns. 80% of the human genome is introns.

- African Locusts have nerve cells which start in the abdomen but are connected to the wing.

- Pandas use an enlarged radial sesamoid bones from grasping objects as opposed to having a dedicated thumb, as do primates.

- Orchid flowers have complicated reproductive devices made from an aggregate of structures used on other flowers for other purposes.

- Virtually all plants and animals can synthesize Vitamin C, but humans cannot, resulting in scurvy and death if they do not receive it from the food they eat.

- The RuBiSCO enzyme used for carbon fixation in plants is extremely inefficient and has a poor ability to differentiate between O2 of CO2 molecules. Plants must make very large quantities of this enzyme to compensate for this deficiency.

- Dandelions possess sex organs, yet reproduce asexually.

- The circuitous routing of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve, which runs from the brain, loops around the Aortic Arch before heading to the Larynx. In giraffes, this feature has over 20 feet of nerve length which is unnecessary for function.

- The breathing reflex is unconsciously stimulated by the presence of CO2, a poisonous gas, and not by O2, the gas required for animals to live.

- Endothermic (warm blooded) animals are extremely energy inefficient; a single chicken which could feed a human for 1 day could feed a full grown alligator for 1 month, since it is not wasting energy to regulate its core body temperature.

- Bats possess dense mammalian bones not adapted for flight while flightless ostriches and penguins still retain their light hollow avian bones better suited to a flying animal. Speaking of which, why do Ostriches, Penguins, Kiwi, etc even NEED wings, since they don’t fly?

- The Blind Fish Astyanax Mexicanus still possesses vestigial eyes, yet lives in total darkness where sight is not necessary.

- Many animals possess vestigial structures which serve no functional purpose – think dew claws in dogs, hip bones and hind legs in whales, etc.

- Medusa jellyfish and hydra are biologically immortal yet most animals, including God’s chosen humans, are not.

THE HUMAN RACE

- Humans both breathe and consume food and water through the Pharynx. This ensures a portion of us will choke to death each year while eating or drinking. This is not a problem in some of our mammalian cousins like dolphins and whales, who have separated respiration and digestive tracts.

- The female reproductive system will occasionally implant a fertilized egg in the fallopian tube, or outside the uterus in the abdominal cavity, resulting in an ectopic pregnancy. This almost always results in the death of the mother and child if the pregnancy is not terminated immediately.

- During birth, women must push the baby out through their pelvis. If the head of the baby is too large, it will not squeeze through and usually results in the death of the mother and child prior to the development of caesarian section surgery.

- Male testicles develop in the abdominal cavity, then descend into the scrotum. If this is impinged, they can become impacted, gangrene, and kill the male.

- Humans can be born breech (feet first) which can asphyxiate the baby if it is not removed from the womb quickly.

- During labor or birth, the umbilical cord, which supplies the baby nourishment, can become wrapped around the neck, strangling the baby to death, if not removed quickly.

- The prostate gland is prone to swelling as we age. As it encircles the urethra and lies next to the bladder, this swelling can affect our ability to urinate freely and reduce effective bladder capacity.

- We have extremely weak teeth which are prone to decay. Serious tooth decay can cause blood borne infections which are fatal. It is believed this was the most common form of death in prehistoric humans. We only get one set of permanent teeth which have a tendency to fall out in old age and are not replaced. By contrast a Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) regrows all of its teeth every 10 days!

- Our knees and elbows are held together with ligaments and are easy to tear or wear out. This is a crippling injury when it happens.

- We have benign vestigial features that are useless to us.
Tonsils
Hymen
Ear Muscles
Nipples and breast tissue in human males
Coccyx (tailbone)
Erector Pilli (Goosebumps)
Whiskers
Various Skeletal Musculatures
Occipitalis Minor of the Head
The palmaris longus muscle of the Arm
The levator claviculae muscle of the Neck
The pyramidalis muscle of the abdomen
The plantaris muscle of the leg
Vestigial behaviors - The palmar grasp reflex in infants.

- Some vestigial features can cause medical problems and even life threatening complications
Wisdom Teeth (Third Molar)
Appendix

- The human eye has blind spots due to the placement of the optic nerve in the field of vision plus the concentrations of light sensitive cells (rods and cones) over the surface of the retina.

- Though we can sense reds and greens like other primates, human eyesight is relatively poor in terms of visual acuity. Octopi see better than we do. A peregrine falcon (Falco Peregrinus) can hit dive speeds greater than 230 mph and all the time it can keep a single vole in the middle of a wheat field in razor sharp focus.

- The eye is prone to changing shape as we age, causing blurriness in our vision.

- The cornea is prone to the formation of cataracts

- All images captured by the retina are inverted. They must be rotated 180° when the image is processed by the optic centers of the brain.

- We have relatively poor night vision and see best out of the periphery of our field of view in low light, since this is where the greatest concentration of rods are on the retina. By contrast, a African lion (Panthera Leo) has low light vision on par with Generation IV night vision equipment.

- Our lungs are very inefficient at extracting oxygen from the air. Birds have much more efficient lungs. Because of this, some Asian species of geese have been know to fly at altitudes in excess of 20,000 ft ASL.

- We can only see a small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Insects can see in infrared and ultraviolet sections of the electromagnetic spectrum as well.

- Our olfactory senses are extremely limited when compared with those of, say, a wolf (Canis Lupus).

- We do not have the ability to regenerate severed limbs, unlike lizards, which can regrow their tails or starfish, which can regrow their entire body from a single severed limb.

- Malfunctioning genes or multiple copies of genes or chromosomes cause over 5000 genetic disorders in humans, including Down’s Syndrome and Lou Gehrig’s Disease.


My favorite "cosmic" goof for "fine tuned for life".
The average lifespan of a Black Hole is 100 times that of a star.
That means for .000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 (1^-80) of the life of the universe, there will be no life in the universe. Not exactly "fine tuned" for life.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating Yogi, CAAT-LY.
Assistant Manager, Vice Detection, Whoville : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

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24-07-2013, 05:35 PM
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
Very nice.
And you've only scratched the surface.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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24-07-2013, 06:27 PM
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
Galaxy collisions merely stir things around a bit. It sounds horrible, like thousands of star systems are smashing together and causing unimaginable devastation, but in actuality the odds of two stars colliding is zero (per Lawrence Krauss). So, I don't think life would even notice.

Other than that, it's a nice list. In the procreation department, you could mention the horribly inefficient use of energy:
· Dandelions well spread 1000 seeds in order to make one copy of itself.
· The female leopard frog will lay up to 6000 eggs. Of which there will only be an average of two offspring.
· Some species of fish lay millions of eggs in order to make two more fish.
· A human male ejaculated millions of sperm, in order for one to fertilize an egg.

Intelligent? Or tremendously wasteful?

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24-07-2013, 07:49 PM
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
I know I have posted this elsewhere but it would be very difficult to hold onto the idea that life is 'designed' with any sort of efficiency after watching this:




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29-07-2013, 03:10 AM
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
(24-07-2013 05:34 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  My favorite "cosmic" goof for "fine tuned for life".
The average lifespan of a Black Hole is 100 times that of a star.
That means for .000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 (1^-80) of the life of the universe, there will be no life in the universe. Not exactly "fine tuned" for life.

Black holes emit radiation in the form of Hawking's radiation and in the case of binary black hole systems, gravity waves. In terms of the life span of the universe, Blackholes are like batteries releasing their energy slowly while stars release it quickly...like capacitors.

Who is to say that when all the stars are gone life won't someday flourish in the relative warmth of a black hole?

Vosur, Anjele, Hanoff.....have you learned nothing in my absence?
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29-07-2013, 03:20 AM
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
(24-07-2013 06:27 PM)Jeffasaurus Wrote:  Galaxy collisions merely stir things around a bit. It sounds horrible, like thousands of star systems are smashing together and causing unimaginable devastation, but in actuality the odds of two stars colliding is zero (per Lawrence Krauss). So, I don't think life would even notice.

Other than that, it's a nice list. In the procreation department, you could mention the horribly inefficient use of energy:
· Dandelions well spread 1000 seeds in order to make one copy of itself.
· The female leopard frog will lay up to 6000 eggs. Of which there will only be an average of two offspring.
· Some species of fish lay millions of eggs in order to make two more fish.
· A human male ejaculated millions of sperm, in order for one to fertilize an egg.

Intelligent? Or tremendously wasteful?

What do you think happens to all those seeds and eggs that don't end up being used in the production of an offspring? Most if not all get consumed by other living things so they don't really go to waste do they?

Vosur, Anjele, Hanoff.....have you learned nothing in my absence?
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29-07-2013, 06:15 AM
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
(24-07-2013 05:15 PM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  THE HUMAN RACE

- Humans both breathe and consume food and water through the Pharynx. This ensures a portion of us will choke to death each year while eating or drinking. This is not a problem in some of our mammalian cousins like dolphins and whales, who have separated respiration and digestive tracts.

- The female reproductive system will occasionally implant a fertilized egg in the fallopian tube, or outside the uterus in the abdominal cavity, resulting in an ectopic pregnancy. This almost always results in the death of the mother and child if the pregnancy is not terminated immediately.

- During birth, women must push the baby out through their pelvis. If the head of the baby is too large, it will not squeeze through and usually results in the death of the mother and child prior to the development of caesarian section surgery.

- Male testicles develop in the abdominal cavity, then descend into the scrotum. If this is impinged, they can become impacted, gangrene, and kill the male.

- Humans can be born breech (feet first) which can asphyxiate the baby if it is not removed from the womb quickly.

- During labor or birth, the umbilical cord, which supplies the baby nourishment, can become wrapped around the neck, strangling the baby to death, if not removed quickly.

- The prostate gland is prone to swelling as we age. As it encircles the urethra and lies next to the bladder, this swelling can affect our ability to urinate freely and reduce effective bladder capacity.

- We have extremely weak teeth which are prone to decay. Serious tooth decay can cause blood borne infections which are fatal. It is believed this was the most common form of death in prehistoric humans. We only get one set of permanent teeth which have a tendency to fall out in old age and are not replaced. By contrast a Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) regrows all of its teeth every 10 days!

- Our knees and elbows are held together with ligaments and are easy to tear or wear out. This is a crippling injury when it happens.

- We have benign vestigial features that are useless to us.
Tonsils
Hymen
Ear Muscles
Nipples and breast tissue in human males
Coccyx (tailbone)
Erector Pilli (Goosebumps)
Whiskers
Various Skeletal Musculatures
Occipitalis Minor of the Head
The palmaris longus muscle of the Arm
The levator claviculae muscle of the Neck
The pyramidalis muscle of the abdomen
The plantaris muscle of the leg
Vestigial behaviors - The palmar grasp reflex in infants.

- Some vestigial features can cause medical problems and even life threatening complications
Wisdom Teeth (Third Molar)
Appendix

- The human eye has blind spots due to the placement of the optic nerve in the field of vision plus the concentrations of light sensitive cells (rods and cones) over the surface of the retina.

- Though we can sense reds and greens like other primates, human eyesight is relatively poor in terms of visual acuity. Octopi see better than we do. A peregrine falcon (Falco Peregrinus) can hit dive speeds greater than 230 mph and all the time it can keep a single vole in the middle of a wheat field in razor sharp focus.

- The eye is prone to changing shape as we age, causing blurriness in our vision.

- The cornea is prone to the formation of cataracts

- All images captured by the retina are inverted. They must be rotated 180° when the image is processed by the optic centers of the brain.

- We have relatively poor night vision and see best out of the periphery of our field of view in low light, since this is where the greatest concentration of rods are on the retina. By contrast, a African lion (Panthera Leo) has low light vision on par with Generation IV night vision equipment.

- Our lungs are very inefficient at extracting oxygen from the air. Birds have much more efficient lungs. Because of this, some Asian species of geese have been know to fly at altitudes in excess of 20,000 ft ASL.

- We can only see a small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Insects can see in infrared and ultraviolet sections of the electromagnetic spectrum as well.

- Our olfactory senses are extremely limited when compared with those of, say, a wolf (Canis Lupus).

- We do not have the ability to regenerate severed limbs, unlike lizards, which can regrow their tails or starfish, which can regrow their entire body from a single severed limb.

- Malfunctioning genes or multiple copies of genes or chromosomes cause over 5000 genetic disorders in humans, including Down’s Syndrome and Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

[/i]

I just want to say; Another bit of off design or oversight is the existence of Avulsion fractures. They are fractures wherein a piece of bone has been chipped or torn away from the rest of the bone by stress from the tendons.
I myself am an on-going victim of the ol' Avulsion on my left elbow, where at the bottom, left side of my homerus a nice chunk was torn away by the tendons after turning and putting pressure on my arm. I can to this day knock that corner of my elbow on a door frame and be fated with a few weeks of pain and near immobility.

Now I say to you: Surely a thing capable of designing and creating life on such magnitudes as we see today and from the past would have thought to leave that particular feature out of the production model somehow.

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.[/align]
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29-07-2013, 05:22 PM
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
(29-07-2013 03:20 AM)Heywood Jahblome Wrote:  
(24-07-2013 06:27 PM)Jeffasaurus Wrote:  Other than that, it's a nice list. In the procreation department, you could mention the horribly inefficient use of energy:
· Dandelions well spread 1000 seeds in order to make one copy of itself.
· The female leopard frog will lay up to 6000 eggs. Of which there will only be an average of two offspring.
· Some species of fish lay millions of eggs in order to make two more fish.
· A human male ejaculated millions of sperm, in order for one to fertilize an egg.

Intelligent? Or tremendously wasteful?

What do you think happens to all those seeds and eggs that don't end up being used in the production of an offspring? Most if not all get consumed by other living things so they don't really go to waste do they?

While that may be the case for seeds and eggs, what becomes of the millions of human sperm? Based on your profile name, I can see why you'd easily conclude that they get consumed. Realistically, they get wasted.

From the perspective of a designer, an intelligent designer, a far more efficient system would make more sense. The topic of this thread is to point out unintelligent design, thus negating any validation of a designer. Inefficiency is not intelligent design.

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30-07-2013, 12:29 AM
RE: Bad Design (or Stupid Design to borrow from NDT)
(29-07-2013 05:22 PM)Jeffasaurus Wrote:  
(29-07-2013 03:20 AM)Heywood Jahblome Wrote:  What do you think happens to all those seeds and eggs that don't end up being used in the production of an offspring? Most if not all get consumed by other living things so they don't really go to waste do they?

While that may be the case for seeds and eggs, what becomes of the millions of human sperm? Based on your profile name, I can see why you'd easily conclude that they get consumed. Realistically, they get wasted.

From the perspective of a designer, an intelligent designer, a far more efficient system would make more sense. The topic of this thread is to point out unintelligent design, thus negating any validation of a designer. Inefficiency is not intelligent design.

Rub one out in the shower and bacteria that inhabit the sewer will eat it up. Living things decompose and are either consumed or release their nutrients back into the soil.

Vosur, Anjele, Hanoff.....have you learned nothing in my absence?
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