"Bad" words
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02-04-2016, 06:23 PM
"Bad" words
(02-04-2016 06:19 PM)Marozz Wrote:  
(02-04-2016 05:19 PM)Sam Wrote:  The only fucking reason, that certain fucking words have any fucking power to fucking well offend fucking people. Is because we fucking well avoid saying these fucking words in the first fucking place. If every fucking person said fuck or fucking, every other fucking word, it wouldn't fucking well be so fucking taboo.

For fuck's sake.

Jayus fucking wept! Sounds like someone from my fucking neck of the woods, Dublin.


Ireland and Wales clearly have much in common.

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02-04-2016, 06:29 PM
RE: "Bad" words
(01-04-2016 10:12 PM)debna27 Wrote:  Just wondering if anybody had any theories beyond my ideas on this topic.
Even after I left the church, I refused to swear or use foul language in everyday life. I don't think I intentionally cussed until I had been living my own life for over a year. Something about it just felt "wrong" for me...I had no real objections to it for other people, it just wasn't something I was comfortable doing.
Similarly, my (very religious) mother finds swearing to be one of the most reprehensible things possible...or at least she acts that way. She will purposely avoid a movie or TV show if it has too much bad language (apart from any other concerns). I've tried to talk to her about it, but she just says that she's "very sensitive" and when she hears bad language it literally hurts her, in a physical sense.
Why is this the case? Why do some words hold so much more power than others, regardless of the way that they are used? It's all just different combinations of letters. How do they hold such moral and ethical power?
My ideas are roughly in two categories:
First is the broader idea that language is a social construct. If we're conditioned as a group to think of something as either positive or negative, then it will remain that way until the conditioning is reversed. Words are the same way: if we're told that "fuck" and "shit" are bad things to say or hear, we will shy away from them if we're trying to fit in to the rules of the moral majority. But this doesn't explain the root of the phenomenon. Why THESE words specifically? (Why is "fuck" worse that "fornicate"? Why is "shit" worse than "feces" or even "crap"?)
That's where my second theory comes into play, that of intention. Often when these words are used, they're meant to have an effect that goes beyond the word itself. I think this is the most obvious when it comes to racial slurs, but it can apply to pretty much any situation. Many times people swear when they're angry, or when they're trying to fight against the rules that society has out into place (regarding language directly, but often regarding larger issues as well). But this isn't always the case. Is it just a sort of conditioned response to associate these words with these emotions/intentions, regardless of whether or not those are present at the time?

Swearing is like 'beauty is in the eye of the beholder' it is in the ear of the hearer. I used to have my own business hiring young guys to work on construction. And I would find young guys who couldn't fucking talk without fucking saying fuck a half a dozen fucking times in every fucking sentence. It had absolutely no meaning to the person talking that way, Nor did they seem conscious that it was offensive to others.
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02-04-2016, 06:29 PM
RE: "Bad" words
(02-04-2016 06:23 PM)Sam Wrote:  
(02-04-2016 06:19 PM)Marozz Wrote:  Jayus fucking wept! Sounds like someone from my fucking neck of the woods, Dublin.


Ireland and Wales clearly have much in common.

It would seem fucking so. Big Grin

“The first duty of a man is to think for himself” ― José Martí
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02-04-2016, 08:04 PM
RE: "Bad" words
My dad was from the Bronx. According the stories, Jigsaw's first word was "shit." (He was born in the Bronx, too.) So for me, swearing was just how things were. Thing is, we (then and now) swear in English and French. My grandmother never swore, but you get a bunch of frog kids together and many are going to fly. When we visited my aunt in New York, my cousin and I would swear when no adults were around. From him I learned the colorful Italian words. My dad used a few from Irish Gaelic, since his family was from Ireland. We didn't use tabarnak, as that's Québécois, and we're Acadien. But I still often use "mange de la marde" (the "de" is barely even used, so it's more like "mange la marde"). The proper spelling is merde, but in our dialect it's pronounced marde.

So from a young age, I knew more ethnic slurs than anyone I knew, swore in a few languages, and wanted more. Now I can also swear in Spanish, both Mexican and Colombian dialects. I sometimes joke that Jigsaw and I are part of the United Fucking Nations.
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02-04-2016, 09:26 PM
RE: "Bad" words
(02-04-2016 05:24 PM)Anjele Wrote:  
(02-04-2016 05:19 PM)Sam Wrote:  The only fucking reason, that certain fucking words have any fucking power to fucking well offend fucking people. Is because we fucking well avoid saying these fucking words in the first fucking place. If every fucking person said fuck or fucking, every other fucking word, it wouldn't fucking well be so fucking taboo.

For fuck's sake.

You sound a lot like my dad. Wink

For dad, the word 'fuck' or a form of the word 'fuck' could, and was, used as every part of speech - noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, pronoun, interjection...all of them.

You omited gerund, but Sam has many examples in his post. Tongue
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02-04-2016, 09:33 PM
RE: "Bad" words
I always assume everyone has see this, but it hasn't been posted yet, so for those of you that haven't...




But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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03-04-2016, 07:08 AM
RE: "Bad" words
How to speak in Southie (Boston)



Atheism: it's not just for communists any more!
America July 4 1776 - November 8 2016 RIP
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03-04-2016, 08:43 AM
RE: "Bad" words
swearing doesnt bother me, but i generally wont do it in public if im around strangers. that would just be rude and bad manners, since i know some people are offended by it. it does irritate me when others do it in public though, because it shows what a scum bag they are since they obviously dont give a shit. especially around children. now around friends and such ill let the obscenities fly.
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03-04-2016, 09:54 AM
RE: "Bad" words
Speaking of context, in Australia, all these phrases could be used as terms of endearment towards your mates—under the right circumstances of course...

"Fuck me, you're a cunt", "How ya going ya old bastard?", “Ahaha you dumb cunt", "Mate, you're a real prick", "What an arsehole you'd be", "Hey cunt, how’s your morning been?".

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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03-04-2016, 10:49 AM
RE: "Bad" words
(01-04-2016 10:21 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  I was in the Navy. I don't think we had any bad words.

Bullshit -- "Last call!" could get any GI pissed off.
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