Barbeque/grill
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27-09-2012, 07:20 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
That sure as hell ain't the way I've ever seen anyone grill a steak. I'm in Canada, not the states, but our neighbors to the south actually make some kick ass BBQ.

I doubt there's anyone who would ever grill a steak like that twice. First time would be enough after eating a burnt on the outside, raw inside steak.

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27-09-2012, 07:38 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
I have a gas grill, one of the latest versions. It has bars under the grill called "flavor bars". These collect up any juices, some turn into smoke, some run off into a little pan and these are wonderful as base for gravy or seasoned liquid. They have an intense flavor like the brown sediment you get on the bottom of pans when browning meat, the stuff that caramelizes, plus smoke.

Until I got this grill I always thought the meat would be sealed so quickly from the high heat that little or no juices remained. And while it is true that the grilled item is chuck full of juices, there is still a considerable amount that runs off and that stuff is pure gold, it has more concentrated flavor than anything you can produce in a pan.

I can't stand the smell of charcoal lighter fluid, and unless you wait a looooooong time before you add the food, I can taste it and it tastes awful.

Lighting it with wood sounds like an ideal alternative, but I grill on an almost daily basis and frankly, I just don't have the extra time to play with coal. That sounds like a great thing though, if you have the time and are feeding a group. Just for a quick dinner for one, it's too time consuming IMO.

The advantages of a gas grill with flavor bars are the precision heat since you can adjust it easily, the extra flavor from smoke that you can infuse at will even by just closing the grill for a couple of minutes at the end, and the unbeatable drippings.

I don't grill much ground meat however, I do that maybe once or twice a year over very low heat after an initial sealing.

When I grew up in Germany, mom made hamburger patties exclusively in a pan. The meat was a mix of pork and beef and various things were added into it - not always all of them. These were egg, chopped onion, chopped peppers, bacon, a variety of fresh spices such as parsley, chives, and whatever your heart desired. Sometimes she made garlic bread, dried a slice and made crumbs of it and added those. Sometimes rice was added.

Given that the spices were varied, what you ate with these burgers varied also. Sometimes potato salad and other salads, sometimes you had tomato sauce over the burger and ate pasta with it, or a variety of sauces and rice. Never saw them eaten with any bread...but any leftover ones (and she always made enough to have a lot of leftovers) disappeared out of the fridge in no time - everyone snacked on them cold. They were tasty just like that.

Back to the grill, I used to grill on charcoal, but a lot less often because it was a real production that took time. But I prefer grilled food to other cooking methods, and I use the grill now like most people use their stove. It is my mainstay. I use it almost daily, year round.

Anyway, I love my grilling time , and the food I produce. It's almost like meditation for me, I look out over part of the garden and it is a very calming thing and I have had more good ideas standing there than at any other time. My mind is largely empty then, and things just pop into it. I love that time.

Oh, and I love grilling on planks. The planks can be any kind of wood, each has a different flavor and favors a different type of meat or fish.

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27-09-2012, 07:47 AM
Barbeque/grill
(26-09-2012 07:56 PM)germanyt Wrote:  Also, grilling something and pouring KC Masterpiece all over it isn't BBQ.

Why would I pour KC on my food? Not only does that seem it possible, it's just plain weird.

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27-09-2012, 07:55 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
(27-09-2012 01:42 AM)Filox Wrote:  Stark, you are right, the difference between bbqing and grilling was lost to me. What I was referring was grilling mostly. I don't know if I ever bbqed as you described it, I would just use a lot of heat with charcoal and grill the meat. So there, that part is now more precise, sorry for the misunderstanding, even I can't know all the Engrish...

Smile

So, you are saying that people do grill normally, but the stupid movie makers never saw how real people use their grills? Did you people notice this fact in the movies? You see, this is the type of open flame grilling I can not understand and I constantly see this in the movies:

[Image: grilling.jpg]

This can only burn the outside part of the steak.

I'm sure so beginners grill their food incorrectly. Everyone I know grills the meat correctly, you do not end up with a pile of cinders or a peice of meat charred on the outside and raw inside.

I Love BBQ but haven't tried doing this on my own. The people that take BBQ seriously would freak out if you did this to their food. This picture is of someone that does not understand heat managementDrinking Beverage

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28-09-2012, 12:34 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
Dom, thanx for the info. Now when I think a bit about it, gas grill is a nice convenience. It does take some time to burn the wood, so this comes like the best alternative, and that nice big metal grill of yours looks pretty badass. Smile

So, what I'm seeing here, the movie makers are RETARDS that never did any cooking, specially grilling. This reminds me on the scenes with cars and bullets, where 1-2 bullets can make the car explode, witch is rather impossible in reality. Or when the car falls down the hill and then explodes. Now we have FIRE and meat in the fire as something normal to do, and if you want to make the fire bigger, just put some gasoline on it. Smile

Now you Americans might have a problem and I think someone should do something about this. You may not know this, but people around the globe think that you Americans have no idea how to grill. People usually "learn" about Americans from movies and when a 100 movies shows the wrong way of "American grilling", then people have the wrong idea and that reflects on the American picture in the rest of the world. Not a good thing. Think about this.

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19-06-2013, 01:11 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
[Image: Image_24159.jpg&width=618]

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19-06-2013, 05:49 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
(19-06-2013 01:11 AM)Filox Wrote:  [Image: Image_24159.jpg&width=618]

To grill or to BBQ? I prefer BBQ being on the northern tip of the great BBQ circuit though Baltimore's contribution to the world Pit Beef is actually grilled not BBQ, no smoke high heat.





Heres the thing that Non-Americans don't seem to get BBQ is not one thing it's regional. Maryland has the Pit Beef thing going go a little south along the coast to North Carolina and you have now hit Pork country. They actually have a mid-state divide as to how they do their BBQ with half the state using a mustard and vinegar based sauce and the other half using tomato vinegar base. NC is all about the chopped pork sandwich.

If you swing inland a bit you get to Memphis, Tennessee. Memphis is the home of the babyback rib and a spicey thicker BBQ finishing sauce. Memphis style has a nice heavy coat of dry rub and is smoked for several hours (depends on the place as to how much smoke they give it) and then is taken off the smoker and has a layer of a spicy tomato based thick, almost glaze mopped on it and is then grilled to caramelize the sugar in the sauce adding another layer to the flavor.

Next stop is Texas, in the Lone Star State your gonna get Brisket. Brisket is a tough very flavorful cut of meat that requires low and very slow cooking to make it tender. Smoking up to 12 hours and then sliced thin and served on a slice of bread with sauce on the side (texas doesn't seem to have a particular sauce but instead has a variety of selections.

Last stop on this tour is Kansas City, Missouri. KC is home to arguably the best all around BBQ in the country. They do it all in KC from pork to beef to turkey and sausage they are really known for their finishing sauce. Thick molasses based sweet sauce with just a little kick is the prefered finish to their BBQ. Again a dry rub is put on the meat liberally and then it is allowed to smoke for hours Sauce is added at the end. Now KC does have 1 other claim to fame the Burnt End sandwich, this is made by smoking the whole brisket and then slicing off the top piece known as the point. The Point is then re-seasoned with more dry rub and is put back on the smoker for another go around (up to 20 hours total cook time) after which it is cut into cubes covered in sauce and served on white bread.

Here is my all purpose Dry rub for BBQ

1 part Salt, preferably either kosher or good sea salt quality matters here
1 part Fresh Ground Pepper, coarse ground
1 Part Chilli Powder, for a kick
2 parts Brown Sugar

Mix well apply liberally to meat.

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19-06-2013, 08:42 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
Both of the last two posts are right on, even though they seem contradictory.

It all depends on the regional availability of various grades and types of meat, and on the pocketbook of course.

It's all good! Smile

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19-06-2013, 08:56 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
It is interesting that on Balkans we only have one word for this, so I do get confused with BBQ and grill. For me it's only one word, but the way you prepare it depends on the part and type of meat you buy. I'd say we grill it all, but it's not just that simple. The only important thing is that there is some meat and some burned wood, without any open fire, like Americans do in the movies... Smile

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19-06-2013, 09:30 AM
RE: Barbeque/grill
Native Americans grilled over an open fire. Some did it on sticks that would be turned, like a spit. Some tribes used wood planks over open fire. I am sure other tribes came up with their own versions.

Cowboys often travelled long distances and cooked over open fires.

I wouldn't knock it altogether, I am sure there is a skill involved that will make it come out well.

I think a big part of good cooking is to do it with whatever you have available and still make it come out delicious.

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