Beauty of Mathematics
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23-09-2015, 08:30 PM
Beauty of Mathematics
I am currently a junior engineering and mathematics major in college. Mathematical models of phenomena in nature never cease to amaze me. It seems the deeper you dig into ANY field of study, the more mathematics you find. From simple electronics to cosmological expansion, there exists an equation for damn near everything. The ancients would have viewed modern man as gods. Maybe if we could meet people from 2000 years in the future, we would see them as gods. All of the processes in nature we can currently predict will be nothing compared to 2K years in the future. So beautiful! Anyone else share this viewpoint?
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23-09-2015, 08:52 PM
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
It is quite amazing what we can do with our mathematical tools. I think looking 2000 years into the future would be mind boggling for us--I have been amazed at the progress we've made in my own lifetime.
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24-09-2015, 10:58 AM
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
(23-09-2015 08:30 PM)Timj Wrote:  Anyone else share this viewpoint?

Yes.

Although I was hoping for a documentary I haven't seen when I clicked the OP. Tongue

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24-09-2015, 12:38 PM
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
People who say mathematics is "not impressive" probably never made it into Algebra I.
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24-09-2015, 02:59 PM
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
I LOVE Euler's identity! So handy!
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24-09-2015, 03:08 PM (This post was last modified: 24-09-2015 03:12 PM by jockmcdock.)
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
(24-09-2015 02:59 PM)Timj Wrote:  I LOVE Euler's identity! So handy!

I love it for it's beauty.

When I was at uni, my lecturer finished his lecture by showing how Euler's identity could be derived from Euler's formula.

We were gobsmacked.

He then stated that if there were ever a proof of god, this was it.
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24-09-2015, 03:13 PM (This post was last modified: 24-09-2015 03:17 PM by Timj.)
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
(24-09-2015 03:08 PM)jockmcdock Wrote:  
(24-09-2015 02:59 PM)Timj Wrote:  I LOVE Euler's identity! So handy!

I love it for it's beauty.

When I was at uni, my lecturer finished his lecture by showing how Euler's identity could be derived from Euler's formula.

We were gobsmacked.

He then stated that if there ever a proof of god, this was it.


I actually use it quite often. I guess it relates to cosh, sinh, etc... functions too. (I presume these are derived from Euler's identity?)
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24-09-2015, 03:15 PM (This post was last modified: 24-09-2015 03:20 PM by Timj.)
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
Something like 2 sin^6 (..) is much easier with Euler's Identity, IMO.
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24-09-2015, 03:27 PM
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
(24-09-2015 03:13 PM)Timj Wrote:  I actually use it quite often. I guess it relates to cosh, sinh, etc... functions too. (I presume these are derived from Euler's identity?)

I don't know if the functions are derived from Euler's formula, but it would be useful in using the functions in the complex domain.
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24-09-2015, 03:37 PM
RE: Beauty of Mathematics
(24-09-2015 03:27 PM)jockmcdock Wrote:  
(24-09-2015 03:13 PM)Timj Wrote:  I actually use it quite often. I guess it relates to cosh, sinh, etc... functions too. (I presume these are derived from Euler's identity?)

I don't know if the functions are derived from Euler's formula, but it would be useful in using the functions in the complex domain.

Oh, it's awesome in trigonometric calculations. Say you have sin^5 x. Take Euler's definition of sin... sin x = [e^(ix) - e^(-ix)]/2i. Take this entire term (call it f(x)) then just do. [f(x)]^5 using a binomial expansion. Matter of fact, all of the trig identities can be derived with his definitions.
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