Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
28-03-2014, 12:14 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(28-03-2014 12:11 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  Well to be fair the Vatican had that down well before America. We just made it a consumers product.

true, true.

'It's not a lie, if you believe it.' - George Costanza
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-03-2014, 12:17 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
Oh gosh, the other day I saw a clip of a megachurch over here (you guys have probably already seen it!) where a bald eagle was released inside the church. It was scared of course, but the crowd were all chanting USA, USA, USA! And then it crashed into the window and they all cheered.

Real nice.

'It's not a lie, if you believe it.' - George Costanza
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-03-2014, 12:21 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(28-03-2014 12:17 AM)prettylogical Wrote:  Oh gosh, the other day I saw a clip of a megachurch over here (you guys have probably already seen it!) where a bald eagle was released inside the church. It was scared of course, but the crowd were all chanting USA, USA, USA! And then it crashed into the window and they all cheered.

Real nice.

Yeah, I saw that. I call it......ironic serendipity. Angel

(not for the bird)

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes evenheathen's post
28-03-2014, 02:01 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(28-03-2014 12:21 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  
(28-03-2014 12:17 AM)prettylogical Wrote:  Oh gosh, the other day I saw a clip of a megachurch over here (you guys have probably already seen it!) where a bald eagle was released inside the church. It was scared of course, but the crowd were all chanting USA, USA, USA! And then it crashed into the window and they all cheered.

Real nice.

Yeah, I saw that. I call it......ironic serendipity. Angel

(not for the bird)

It's actually the first item on this list of Dusty's 'Top 10 Christian Fails of 2013'.

Language is NSFW.




[Image: E3WvRwZ.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-03-2014, 02:32 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(28-03-2014 02:01 AM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  
(28-03-2014 12:21 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  Yeah, I saw that. I call it......ironic serendipity. Angel

(not for the bird)

It's actually the first item on this list of Dusty's 'Top 10 Christian Fails of 2013'.

Language is NSFW.




And that's where I saw it! I love his channel.

'It's not a lie, if you believe it.' - George Costanza
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-03-2014, 04:11 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
I've decided that if I ever find myself in America and being questioned about my religious beliefs I'll respond by saying that I'm an atheist as most people are in Britain and that we're all a bunch of proud godless heathens.

That way it pushes the point that your religious upbringing (or lack of) is determined by where you were born. It will play on their fears that christianity is not a universal truth.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Mathilda's post
03-04-2014, 03:39 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
I'm an Aussie living in The Netherlands. In neither country is my atheism an issue.

Several years ago, I was working with a colleague in The Netherlands on a project and we had to put in a few extra hours on the weekend to get it finished. We agreed to contact each other by telephone. I suggested that I ring him at a certain time on Sunday morning. He told me not to as he would be giving a Bible class at that time. That was the first time I knew anything about his views on religion. I asked me if I believed and I told him I was an atheist. That was the only time we "discussed" religion and we continued working happily together for several years.

I don't really accept the "young country" argument wrt the US. If anything, Australia is a slightly younger country and we don't really have the mega-religion phenomenon that you in the States have. Our current Prime Minister is a bit of a fundie and I suspect would like (his) religion to have influence in Australian politics. Our previous PM was an atheist (and wasn't married to the guy she was living with - shock, horror). The one before her was a devout Christian but didn't let his beliefs influence his politics.

You've probably seen this before, but here's the Chaser's view on religious programs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMfX3uA15RM
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like jockmcdock's post
03-04-2014, 04:31 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
I live in England and you're corrrect, atheism is no real issue at all. In fact in last years census we actually had the option of checking the no religious belief box (can't now remember if it was phrased like that but that was what it meant) and I believe a very high percentage checked that one, higher than the churches thought/hoped it would be Thumbsup

It is true we have bishops in the House of Lords, a fact many of us are not happy with but it seems to have no real impact on my daily life nor does the monarchy who are more a symbolic figure head these days. I believe Queen Lizzie has some powers but never really uses them. It's all just a load of pomp and ceremony.

I did go to a Church of England school between the ages of 5-11 yrs old but I don't remember religion being a big part of it. We had to go to church at certain times of the year but certainly not every week and religious education was one lesson a week and wasn't incorporated into anything else. I always look at the Church of England faith as 'Christianity lite'. I have friends who went to catholic schools and that's a whole different story, that's Christianity on steroids from what they have told me.

I work with a few xtians and we have debated god a couple of times but they always try and switch the burden of proof on to me so I just tend to have a 'whatever dude' attitude and leave them to their nonsense. So apart from the weather, I am glad I live in a country that on the whole doesn't really do god and doesn't have megachurches.

I do agree though, we have had many, many more years to start to disregard myth and superstition and I hope that the younger countries head our way and begin to disregard them too.

"The person who is certain, and who claims divine warrant for his certainty, belongs now to the infancy of our species." - Christopher Hitchens

"Remember kids, if you don't sin, then Jesus died for nothing. Have a great day!" - Ricky Gervais
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
03-04-2014, 04:55 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
Although, I just wanted to add, we now have mosques cropping up in town centres and if they start doing that call to prayer thing then I'm outta here. It would feel like a step backwards. Haven't decided where I'd emigrate to yet but Australia sounds like my kind of place.

"The person who is certain, and who claims divine warrant for his certainty, belongs now to the infancy of our species." - Christopher Hitchens

"Remember kids, if you don't sin, then Jesus died for nothing. Have a great day!" - Ricky Gervais
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
03-04-2014, 08:07 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(03-04-2014 04:55 AM)Eva Wrote:  Haven't decided where I'd emigrate to yet but Australia sounds like my kind of place.

Which may help explain jockmcdock's point about young countries not always being religious because it does not apply to Australia. Lots of English have emigrated to Australia in the past. My own aunt and uncle moved over there, had four children and then eventually moved back. After the second world war there were the ten pound poms as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Pound_Poms
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: