Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
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03-04-2014, 09:47 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
England may not be shoving Christianity in your face but it is still evolving itself and has taken many other religions upon its shores making it more multicultural. Since I have been alive I have seen an influx of Pakistani and Indian's coming over and within the last few years the doors have opened up to nearly the whole of Europe.

We do have a lot of old historical churches, yet there are many, many, MANY more in plain buildings and in the poorer areas you have more mosques, as it is in the poor areas where all of the immigrants seem to end up.

I feel so much, and yet I feel nothing.
I am a rock, I am the sky, the birds and the trees and everything beyond.
I am the wind, in the fields in which I roar. I am the water, in which I drown.
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07-07-2014, 03:53 PM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
I think that, perversely it also has something to do with the US constitution - by openly separating church and state it's made religion into just another business and it seems to me that in the US, business trumps all. Priests are after all just salesmen in slightly weird clothes.

Ironically although the big Q is head of our church and state - it could be argued that she does just as much as anyone to keep church and state separate here in the UK - and yes it's the UK (sorry - pet peeve). I think the role of the execution of Charles I also is worth mentioning here - part of the civil war fight was to do with Charles' claim to have divine right to rule. When the monarchy was re-instated under Charles II this was done away with and so now the connection between church and state is largely ceremonial.
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15-07-2014, 07:48 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(07-07-2014 03:53 PM)CiderThinker Wrote:  I think that, perversely it also has something to do with the US constitution - by openly separating church and state it's made religion into just another business and it seems to me that in the US, business trumps all. Priests are after all just salesmen in slightly weird clothes.

Ironically although the big Q is head of our church and state - it could be argued that she does just as much as anyone to keep church and state separate here in the UK - and yes it's the UK (sorry - pet peeve). I think the role of the execution of Charles I also is worth mentioning here - part of the civil war fight was to do with Charles' claim to have divine right to rule. When the monarchy was re-instated under Charles II this was done away with and so now the connection between church and state is largely ceremonial.

Yeah, there are also nice tax breaks for religious institutions here. It's too easy to profit from, the state I'm from, churches are more plentiful than used car lots.

Gods derive their power from post-hoc rationalizations. -The Inquisition

Using the supernatural to explain events in your life is a failure of the intellect to comprehend the world around you. -The Inquisition
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15-07-2014, 10:57 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(27-03-2014 11:11 PM)prettylogical Wrote:  Hey everyone, just wanted to share my thoughts on this subject, having experienced it myself.

I lived in England for 15 years of my life, most of them as an atheist, and it really wasn't an issue to anyone I came across. In fact, most of the people I went to school with thought the same way as me about religion. Of course there were a handful of people who started a bible club... but it wasn't popular.

Anyway, I never ever felt awkward about telling people I'm an atheist while I was living over there. I'm proud to be an atheist, but I'll admit I sometimes feel awkward about revealing that to people here in the states. My husband is from Oklahoma, and he's admitted to me that it's rare to find open atheists there. Prime example, I visited my in laws not so long ago, and my mother-in-law wanted myself and Cody to go to church with her one Sunday... Pentecostal church. I went, to be polite to her, but when offered communion of course I turned it down - it's a religious ritual that I won't be a part of. My refusal to take communion raised more than a few eyebrows. Anyway, before this my in laws had no idea I was an atheist - I don't feel the need to introduce myself as one, or tell people unless it is brought up. All of Cody's family are Christians, so now it's made it a little awkward for me. But my point is that I shouldn't have to feel awkward! I never did before, so what is it with this country?

Dodgy

It is an American disease that is thankfully on the decline. Just ten years ago (quoting off of memory so may not be balls on accurate and I am at work, so can't access my vast database of info hehe) US was around 15% non religious, now as of 2013 we are about 35%. There is a light in the tunnel. The other day I went out to lunch wearing my goodwithoutgod/I love atheism tshirt, as I was being seated another employee quickly approached me and asked, "what does your shirt say"? I thought uhoh, here we go, he is fixing to have a bad day (I don't get intimidated easily) and I turned so he could see my shirt, he read it slowly out loud, looked up, gave me a thumbs up and said "awesome shirt bro!" shook my hand and walked off. I was pleasantly surprised.

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15-07-2014, 02:08 PM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(27-03-2014 11:11 PM)prettylogical Wrote:  I never did before, so what is it with this country?
The thing about USA is that they seem to think the world revolves around them.

An example would be the title of this thread.
When you say "here" do you assume people know that means America?
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15-07-2014, 08:22 PM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
I think some really interesting points are being touched on here. Religion is deeply ingrained into the history of European countries and is still intwined in our political systems whether we like it or not. But socially it may not be so important depending where you're from. Whereas in the states it seems even though secularism is ingrained in the constitution religiosity can dominate local social areas.
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28-07-2014, 11:33 PM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
(15-07-2014 10:57 AM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  
(27-03-2014 11:11 PM)prettylogical Wrote:  Hey everyone, just wanted to share my thoughts on this subject, having experienced it myself.

I lived in England for 15 years of my life, most of them as an atheist, and it really wasn't an issue to anyone I came across. In fact, most of the people I went to school with thought the same way as me about religion. Of course there were a handful of people who started a bible club... but it wasn't popular.

Anyway, I never ever felt awkward about telling people I'm an atheist while I was living over there. I'm proud to be an atheist, but I'll admit I sometimes feel awkward about revealing that to people here in the states. My husband is from Oklahoma, and he's admitted to me that it's rare to find open atheists there. Prime example, I visited my in laws not so long ago, and my mother-in-law wanted myself and Cody to go to church with her one Sunday... Pentecostal church. I went, to be polite to her, but when offered communion of course I turned it down - it's a religious ritual that I won't be a part of. My refusal to take communion raised more than a few eyebrows. Anyway, before this my in laws had no idea I was an atheist - I don't feel the need to introduce myself as one, or tell people unless it is brought up. All of Cody's family are Christians, so now it's made it a little awkward for me. But my point is that I shouldn't have to feel awkward! I never did before, so what is it with this country?

Dodgy

It is an American disease that is thankfully on the decline. Just ten years ago (quoting off of memory so may not be balls on accurate and I am at work, so can't access my vast database of info hehe) US was around 15% non religious, now as of 2013 we are about 35%. There is a light in the tunnel. The other day I went out to lunch wearing my goodwithoutgod/I love atheism tshirt, as I was being seated another employee quickly approached me and asked, "what does your shirt say"? I thought uhoh, here we go, he is fixing to have a bad day (I don't get intimidated easily) and I turned so he could see my shirt, he read it slowly out loud, looked up, gave me a thumbs up and said "awesome shirt bro!" shook my hand and walked off. I was pleasantly surprised.

There is a hope. Yes

in the name of fanservice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Da7O7ct...fBNP9_IgAw
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24-08-2014, 11:30 AM
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/r...story.html

Wonder how long it'll take the US to get to this point? Sure seems like a long way off.
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28-08-2014, 01:45 PM (This post was last modified: 28-08-2014 02:25 PM by SunnyD1.)
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
The problem arising now in Britain is Islam. Quite frustratingly, the general public seem to defend Islam over anything else. It's really strange to watch. I think the dilemma is that the first people to stand up to Islam were fascist crackpots and idiots in groups such as the BNP and EDL. They made it so any body who stands up against Islam in the future are automatically shunned and labeled as bigots, racists, islamaphobes and so on. The aftermath of this has been severe sympathy from the authorities in favour of the Islamic community.

Muslim communities have been given permission to enforce sharia law within their own reach. There has recently been a massive scandal is south Yorkshire that a Muslim group have been grooming young teenagers for 16 ish years without any repercussion from the police even AFTER several reports and evidence AND an honour killing of a young girl because she was pregnant and threatened to tell the mans family (morally justified in the Quran). I've witnessed these grooming gangs in action as I was brought up in another part of Yorkshire in a densely Muslim populated area. Also, in London there is a group of Muslims that parade around assaulting and enforcing Sharia on everybody they see (justified in the Quran). This has also happened in other parts of Europe such as France and Switzerland. (A recent study showed that 1 in 6 French citizens support the actions of ISIS).

I am no bigot or racist. I have no personal reason to speak out against this issue other than feeling it is my duty as a human being. Many of my friends have been Muslims (majority Kurdish) and they were good people so I do not state that Muslims are bad people. I speak against an ideology, just as people did against Nazism.

France will become an Islamic state within 30 years, who will be next? The neo-liberalism suck ups are blinded by their egos. They state that "not all muslims are the same" not seeing that the issue is the ideology of Islam itself. I read somewhere on Twitter the other day something somebody said which sums it up quite nicely, saying "extreme islam" is like saying "hot fire"

I wasn't sure how it is accepted to post a source on here? so if you need one just ask.

Saints live in flames; wise men, next to them.
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28-08-2014, 01:50 PM (This post was last modified: 28-08-2014 02:26 PM by SunnyD1.)
RE: Being an atheist in England compared to being an atheist here.
And I fsd

Saints live in flames; wise men, next to them.
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