Poll: When I say that I believe something, I mean that…
… I’ve got enough evidence suggesting a notion but I am unsure of its certainty.
… I am sure about the certainty of a notion regardless of what evidence may suggest.
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Believing versus believing
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04-05-2014, 05:54 PM
RE: Believing versus believing
(04-05-2014 03:45 PM)Foxen Wrote:  Stupid damn poll needs a more reasonable option.

Such as...

“It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.”
― Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes
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04-05-2014, 07:30 PM
RE: Believing versus believing
Hello again, djhall. Thanks for coming back.

(04-05-2014 05:46 PM)djhall Wrote:  Yet, that shouldn't stop people who are sure about the certainty of the notion [being able to fly without the aid of lift generating devices] regardless of what evidence may suggest.
I feel that you may have forgotten the question raised in the poll. It starts with the sentence "when I say that I believe something, I mean that…"

If people don't make the claim "I believe I can fly without the aid of machines" then the poll doesn't apply to unaided flight. I haven't suggested that some people make all their decisions disregarding any possible evidence, I am simply suggesting that the verb "believe" can be used as a declaration of implicit uncertainty (option 1) or as a declaration of perceived certainty (option 2).

People may use it in one sense for one set of claims and in the other for a different set, or they may have a clear tendency towards one of the options. But I think it is unlikely that anyone behaves exclusively as described in either option, although I cannot say I know with certainty.

Regarding your interesting personal theory, I think I can understand it; a few cases have sprung to mind while I read your description. But at providing an explanation for why some people may behave as described by option 2, at least regarding some specific notions, you seem to be accepting the premise you found hard to accept, that some people may use the verb "believe" as suggested in option 2. Otherwise, your personal theory would be an unnecessary explanation for a non-phenomenon.

Is that the case? Would it be fair to say that you mostly use the verb as described in the first option, but that you have encountered other people using it as suggested in the second option, for a set of reasons? Or would I be stretching your words too far?

Thanks for sharing your personal theory, djhall. Have fun!
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