Best theory of consciousness?
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28-07-2014, 07:45 PM
Best theory of consciousness?
There are many varying theories of consciousness within the scientific community. Which one makes the most sense to you? And why?
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01-08-2014, 06:30 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
http://www.wired.com/2013/11/christof-ko...ciousness/

Here consciousness is not seen as a new or separate mysterious entity, but simply as a circulating energy, such as electric. As if energy wasn't mysterious enough in itself Drinking Beverage
I like this theory... hypothesis... idea... because it simplifies things and yet it leaves room for some quantum microcapsule interaction in brain.
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01-08-2014, 06:46 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
(28-07-2014 07:45 PM)avalon Wrote:  There are many varying theories of consciousness within the scientific community. Which one makes the most sense to you? And why?

I was not aware there were any scientific theories of consciousness.

Isn't this still in the realm of philosophy?

Meaning... science works best with a well defined question to investigate and discover possible and probable answers but the question of consciousness is not yet defined.

Anyway, I'm reading some Dennett at the moment, just so I can get a small insight (in-sight... consciousness... Big Grin ) into the question.

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01-08-2014, 06:50 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
(01-08-2014 06:30 PM)Luminon Wrote:  http://www.wired.com/2013/11/christof-ko...ciousness/

Here consciousness is not seen as a new or separate mysterious entity, but simply as a circulating energy, such as electric. As if energy wasn't mysterious enough in itself Drinking Beverage
I like this theory... hypothesis... idea... because it simplifies things and yet it leaves room for some quantum microcapsule interaction in brain.

The " Integrated Information Theory, developed by Giulio Tononi" mentioned in the article seems the most likely to me. An analogy might be music is like consciousness. Looking at ever smaller elements (quantum sources) to unravel consciousness would be like trying to understand music by looking into the sound wave of a single note.
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01-08-2014, 06:54 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
(01-08-2014 06:46 PM)DLJ Wrote:  
(28-07-2014 07:45 PM)avalon Wrote:  There are many varying theories of consciousness within the scientific community. Which one makes the most sense to you? And why?

I was not aware there were any scientific theories of consciousness.

Isn't this still in the realm of philosophy?

Meaning... science works best with a well defined question to investigate and discover possible and probable answers but the question of consciousness is not yet defined.

Anyway, I'm reading some Dennett at the moment, just so I can get a small insight (in-sight... consciousness... Big Grin ) into the question.

DLJ,
You might be interested in this:
http://www.science-of-consciousness.com/
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01-08-2014, 07:25 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
The Glasgow Coma Scale. Because it's actually useful at work on a daily basis. However, I really dislike how there is no zero, the scale is 3-15. I don't like how dead people, inanimate objects, and unresponsive patients are all a 3.

I'll go visit the links provided and educate myself, I'm aware this is not answering your question.

"If there's a single thing that life teaches us, it's that wishing doesn't make it so." - Lev Grossman
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01-08-2014, 07:27 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
There is no complete theory of consciousness owing to the hard problem of defining "experience" and how it arises from the brain. The general scientific view, however, would be that the brain creates it; it's a function of the brain and not a separate entity.

Which leaves room for some scientists to claim that consciousness is a separate entity originating from an external source or that it can even exist apart from the brain. There is no proof of any of this, at best only a handful of scientific concepts that somehow suggest consciousness could be more complicated than something the brain could manage alone. There are no good links to be found tying everything together to support the claims. A lot of it is really just quantum woo.

And a quick look at Norman Stubbs' Science of Consciousness website appears to be a series of philosophical conjectures with "Science" solely in the website's name.

Science of Consciousness Wrote:Though I have explained this from several different angles for you, I know that it is still difficult to get. Remember that our minds are thinking machines. They are epistemologically structured. The idea that physics is the ultimate arbiter of all explanation is probably an axiomatic belief in your mind. You just have to chuck that perspective and start all over again with a new epistemological structure that includes both physical nature and functions as affecters of physical events.

To add to your confusion, the implication of the above argument is that function is not physical yet it can have an effect on physical events. This is very awkward when viewed from our current scientific perspective but I hope that I have made it evident that that perspective fails to be complete in explaining physical events. The difficulty here is that we have ‘caused’ effects without a cause, that can be described in terms of physics, or even described physically but only in terms of outcome in a context.

This wouldn’t be so bad if the physical stratum and the functional stratum operated separately but they don’t. They are interlocked at the level of physical forms so that the functional stratum has physical effects and the physical stratum has functional effects. There are both physical affecters and intangible affecters. They both exist as is demonstrated by their effects. We must stretch our idea of existing in the case of intangible affecters to something that has no physical existence, and even more difficult to grasp, to having no existence except as evidenced by its effects. From the perspective of current science these are certainly bazaar ontological complications. We need to rearrange the epistemological organization of our minds to cope.

http://www.science-of-consciousness.com/...ics%20.htm

Did anyone bother trying to follow all of this all of the way through? Facepalm
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01-08-2014, 07:49 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
I'm retracting my statement about how I would go read what was on the link. It was 18 pages. I would need to overdose on Adderall before reading through all of that shit. It shouldn't take 18 mind-numbing pages to make a valid point. I need bullet points.

"If there's a single thing that life teaches us, it's that wishing doesn't make it so." - Lev Grossman
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01-08-2014, 09:14 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
I don't think the bafflegab would seem nearly as impressive if it was summarized better.
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01-08-2014, 09:19 PM
RE: Best theory of consciousness?
(01-08-2014 06:54 PM)avalon Wrote:  ...

DLJ,
You might be interested in this:
http://www.science-of-consciousness.com/

Much appreciated. I will digest.

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