Bicycling!
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06-05-2017, 07:06 PM
RE: Bicycling!
(06-05-2017 06:58 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  
(06-05-2017 06:41 PM)true scotsman Wrote:  Hey, do you remember how many feet of climbing was on that tour. I bet it was a lot. You are so right about the secondary road situation here except for maybe the northern front range from Golden up to Fort Collins. Ah, so many places to go and so little time.

I can definitely see the attraction of a road bike. They're so light and fast. That's why I'm looking at the Cross Check or the Specialized Awol. Not ready to go full skinny tires yet. Also I'm looking hard at the Salsa Fargo. I've heard a lot of great things about that bike. The new model can fit plus size tires too. The Tour Devide Rout goes through the western part of our valley and I see a lot of the Tour Deviders when I'm out riding. A lot of them are riding the Fargo and everyone I've talked to loved them.

I don't remember the total amount of climbing, but it was 1000-2000 feet even on the easy days, and there were some days where it was 5000-6000 feet. Strangely enough, I've done rides here in Wisconsin where there was more "climbing per mile" -- but a different kind of climbing. Trail Ridge Road was about 5000 feet of climbing, but spread out over 20 miles or so. We were climbing for hours, but at a relatively easy grade. The longest climbs around here are only a few miles, with less than 1000 total feet of climbing, but we have a lot of short steep climbs -- maybe only 200-300 feet high, but the grades can be close to 20%.

Skinny tires are a lot faster on pavement, but also more susceptible to flats, and the ride is harsher. You have to find a sweet spot between the extremes of speed and comfort. Same thing with saddles. The big plush soft ones are more comfortable, but a lot of your potential pedaling energy gets absorbed by the saddle instead of going to the pedals, so they are relatively inefficient. I use a pretty stiff saddle. You just wear padded shorts, and you get used to it.

I can see the attraction of mountain bikes and offroad riding, too -- you can get to some really cool places that you can't get to on a road bike (and that it would take days to get to by hiking). I used to do some rock climbing, too, and it had that same advantage. You could get to great places that were just not accessible by any other means (unless you're a bird).Tongue
The Colorado trail is almost 500 miles. It's all mostly singletrack and almost all in very remote and fantastically scenic areas of the high country. It has 89,535 ft. of climbing and there are people who do it in 5-7 days. I've done small sections of it.

Do not lose your knowledge that man's proper estate is an upright posture, an intransigent mind and a step that travels unlimited roads. - Ayn Rand.

Don't sacrifice for me, live for yourself! - Me

The only alternative to Objectivism is some form of Subjectivism. - Dawson Bethrick
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06-05-2017, 07:11 PM
RE: Bicycling!
I'm an off and on casual cyclist. I have a Montague Paratrooper Pro I got a couple years back because it's easily collapsible so I can bring it as a carry on when flying and is a pretty decent off road bike which made for a good alternative to always using the company vehicles to cruise around the site when I was doing fly in fly out remote mine security briefly before getting laid off. I've also got a generic commuting bike, a tow bar for pulling my 5 year old's bike, and one of those wagon things for my 2 year old.

Almost every weekend, now that it's starting to warm up, we go on a family ride into Gatineau park with me pulling my oldest and my girlfriend pulling our youngest.

Time permitting (takes a little over an hour), I frequently ride to work. That involves crossing the bridge from Gatineau into downtown Ottawa, heading north a bit, and bypassing most of downtown by circling the city along the river on Ottawa River Pathway and Aviation Pathway. That adds a little to my distance but I hate riding in the city.

There are some rarely used logging trails near our property up north and I'm looking forward to my son getting old enough to ride with me on those.

I've also considered trying fat tire biking given the intensity of winters here and the number of dedicated fat tire biking trails in the park connected to the bike trail network that almost starts in our back yard.

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06-05-2017, 07:23 PM
RE: Bicycling!
(06-05-2017 06:40 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  
(06-05-2017 06:27 PM)jennybee Wrote:  I've always thought about going with an adventuring group for hiking and backpacking, except I kinda like doing my own thing Tongue I don't like having to go when they tell you it's time to go if I want to stay at a particular spot longer (although, I know that's part of what you pay them for Wink ) But I definitely think there are benefits to going with a group--mainly in the planning, you just book it and leave the leg work to them. Thumbsup

I'm so sorry about that rider in your group Sad

I did one other Timberline trip a few years earlier, and that was a Grand Canyon hiking trip. A big bonus there was being able to hike down into the canyon, stay at Phantom Ranch, and then hike out the next day. Unless you're extremely fit (and extremely ambitious), you can't hike in and out in the same day, and Phantom Ranch is booked years in advance (mostly by and for mule riders). This was the only way for me to do that hike without lugging a heavy pack and camping (and you have to reserve way ahead of time even for camping).

That's one big advantage of group tours -- they can sometimes get you into places that you just couldn't manage on your own (or would have to plan and reserve years in advance to do it on your own).

How many people were in your group typically?
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06-05-2017, 07:23 PM
RE: Bicycling!
(06-05-2017 07:11 PM)yakherder Wrote:  I'm an off and on casual cyclist. I have a Montague Paratrooper Pro I got a couple years back because it's easily collapsible so I can bring it as a carry on when flying and is a pretty decent off road bike which made for a good alternative to always using the company vehicles to cruise around the site when I was doing fly in fly out remote mine security briefly before getting laid off. I've also got a generic commuting bike, a tow bar for pulling my 5 year old's bike, and one of those wagon things for my 2 year old.

Almost every weekend, now that it's starting to warm up, we go on a family ride into Gatineau park with me pulling my oldest and my girlfriend pulling our youngest.

Time permitting (takes a little over an hour), I frequently ride to work. That involves crossing the bridge from Gatineau into downtown Ottawa, heading north a bit, and bypassing most of downtown by circling the city along the river on Ottawa River Pathway and Aviation Pathway. That adds a little to my distance but I hate riding in the city.

There are some rarely used logging trails near our property up north and I'm looking forward to my son getting old enough to ride with me on those.

I've also considered trying fat tire biking given the intensity of winters here and the number of dedicated fat tire biking trails in the park connected to the bike trail network that almost starts in our back yard.
If you have groomed trails the fat bike is great but if the snow gets much deeper than 8 inches deep or it gets wet and packy it's tough going. Fortunately there are lots of groomed trails around and lots of dirt roads that get packed really well by four wheelers . I've ridden down the frozen Rio Grande River. That was a blast. There was about 9 inches of powder on top and a layer of frozen snow under that so there was no slipping at all. We went back two weeks later and things had totally changed. It was warmer and the snow had consolidated and it was a slog. We also try to keep a couple trails packed down. You have to go out after every storm to keep them packed down and rideable . You should definitely get one and you can pull your kids in a sled behind.

Do not lose your knowledge that man's proper estate is an upright posture, an intransigent mind and a step that travels unlimited roads. - Ayn Rand.

Don't sacrifice for me, live for yourself! - Me

The only alternative to Objectivism is some form of Subjectivism. - Dawson Bethrick
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06-05-2017, 08:08 PM
RE: Bicycling!
(06-05-2017 07:23 PM)jennybee Wrote:  
(06-05-2017 06:40 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  I did one other Timberline trip a few years earlier, and that was a Grand Canyon hiking trip. A big bonus there was being able to hike down into the canyon, stay at Phantom Ranch, and then hike out the next day. Unless you're extremely fit (and extremely ambitious), you can't hike in and out in the same day, and Phantom Ranch is booked years in advance (mostly by and for mule riders). This was the only way for me to do that hike without lugging a heavy pack and camping (and you have to reserve way ahead of time even for camping).

That's one big advantage of group tours -- they can sometimes get you into places that you just couldn't manage on your own (or would have to plan and reserve years in advance to do it on your own).

How many people were in your group typically?

I think we had a total of 17 people or something like that, although it kept changing during the tour because some people only did the first half or the last half. We would all leave at the same time in the morning (because we had to eat breakfast as a group, at least if we wanted the free breakfast!), but then we would get strung out, because everyone rides at different speeds, especially in hilly (or mountainous!) terrain. I was often riding by myself or with just a few other people. Then we would all regroup at the end of the day for dinner.

The Grand Canyon hiking trip worked the same way, except that it was a smaller group -- less than 10 people.

There are two blogs by participants in the Colorado cycling tour:

https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=1...=3692&v=Zp

https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=1...=3596&v=mS

The first one even has a photo of me, under "Participants" (and probably in a few other places as well). I'm the guy with the Bombay Bicycle Club jersey and really bad helmet hair.

Laugh out load
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06-05-2017, 08:14 PM
RE: Bicycling!
(06-05-2017 08:08 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  
(06-05-2017 07:23 PM)jennybee Wrote:  How many people were in your group typically?

I think we had a total of 17 people or something like that, although it kept changing during the tour because some people only did the first half or the last half. We would all leave at the same time in the morning (because we had to eat breakfast as a group, at least if we wanted the free breakfast!), but then we would get strung out, because everyone rides at different speeds, especially in hilly (or mountainous!) terrain. I was often riding by myself or with just a few other people. Then we would all regroup at the end of the day for dinner.

The Grand Canyon hiking trip worked the same way, except that it was a smaller group -- less than 10 people.

There are two blogs by participants in the Colorado cycling tour:

https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=1...=3692&v=Zp

https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=1...=3596&v=mS

The first one even has a photo of me, under "Participants" (and probably in a few other places as well). I'm the guy with the Bombay Bicycle Club jersey and really bad helmet hair.

Laugh out load

Oh how fun! It looks like you got to meet some really cool people. And, imo, if you don't have really bad helmet hair, you didn't get a good enough ride in Wink
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07-05-2017, 05:09 PM
RE: Bicycling!
I like to do a bit of cycling, but only if the weather is perfect... slack little me I know LOL. No strong headwinds, no rain, no dirt tracks, no heavy traffic. I do most of my riding on back streets, or what we call 'bike paths' downunder. 20km all-up is probably my limit now.

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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07-05-2017, 07:38 PM
RE: Bicycling!
(07-05-2017 05:09 PM)SYZ Wrote:  I like to do a bit of cycling, but only if the weather is perfect... slack little me I know LOL. No strong headwinds, no rain, no dirt tracks, no heavy traffic. I do most of my riding on back streets, or what we call 'bike paths' downunder. 20km all-up is probably my limit now.

The great thing is you don't have to be out there killing yourself or trying to impress anyone. 20 km is a nice long ride.

Do not lose your knowledge that man's proper estate is an upright posture, an intransigent mind and a step that travels unlimited roads. - Ayn Rand.

Don't sacrifice for me, live for yourself! - Me

The only alternative to Objectivism is some form of Subjectivism. - Dawson Bethrick
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07-05-2017, 07:39 PM
RE: Bicycling!
Just got back from an 11 mile ride, mostly on singletrack. It was a glorious day weather wise. Calm and in the low 70's. My whole family went.

Do not lose your knowledge that man's proper estate is an upright posture, an intransigent mind and a step that travels unlimited roads. - Ayn Rand.

Don't sacrifice for me, live for yourself! - Me

The only alternative to Objectivism is some form of Subjectivism. - Dawson Bethrick
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08-05-2017, 02:32 PM
RE: Bicycling!
(06-05-2017 01:49 PM)true scotsman Wrote:  Who here is into bicycling? What and where do you like to ride?

I prefer dirt roads and single track. I ride a Surly Wednesday and a Specialized Hardrock hard tail. My favorite places to ride are Sedona, Moab and anywhere in Colorado. I hate riding on the road with cars, so you'll most likely see me on remote back roads and trails. I've really gotten into bike packing in the last two years. I love the freedom of having everything you need to survive and have fun and the ability to go where you want and not having to worry about getting back before dark. It's the best thing in the world.
I also enjoy bicycling. I love the freedom it gives me and I love the rush when the wind fllies through my hair. i usually ride bike trails, but am just as content on the open road. I love playing my favorite jams when I'm ridingTongue
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