Bigger is not better.
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14-07-2014, 12:15 AM
RE: Bigger is not better.
(13-07-2014 05:38 PM)CiderThinker Wrote:  As someone with a physical disability - I have to say I find this mindset a load of crap - as atheists it's not a punishment in the first place and secondly - why should dyslexia be a dream extinguisher?

I'll admit I did get emotional writing about this. When you get told by teachers that you're lazy and don't give a damn about school work. Your parent think the same as your teacher because they don't know any better. Like many others they don't get it because they can't see it. It's not a physical disability like yours where people can actually see what's wrong. This invisible infliction is hell. Add the general ignorance that typifies the black community and you're just about in a whole world of pain. That IS punishment.

My cousin's son almost didn't make it into his choice high school because of it. He's currently in a remedial school and is going to be making the jump to a mainstream school next year. The school was requesting confidential teacher evaluations which seemed like reluctance to us. I have a friend who was a grade below me back in the day. He had a brother who was two grades above me in that school. His brother got rejected because of his dyslexia and had to go to a rival school.

8000 years before Jesus, the Egyptian god Horus said, "I am the way, the truth, the life."
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14-07-2014, 12:26 AM
RE: Bigger is not better.
(13-07-2014 06:11 PM)Dom Wrote:  I don't know about dyslexia, I think I heard it is easier to work with within the confines of common schooling than dyscalculia. Dyscalculia makes basic math all but impossible, but it does nicely with geometry and such.

Just because someone doesn't do things the way you have been taught to do them doesn't mean they can't do better than you in the end. Tongue

I've never seen or dealt with dyscalculia. I may be outta line but I'd rank dyslexia higher than a maths issue simply because reading is the foundation of literacy. I you can read you can pretty much teach yourself anything. You don't need maths to live as you describe. Congratulations on beating one of god's many fuck ups by the way.

8000 years before Jesus, the Egyptian god Horus said, "I am the way, the truth, the life."
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14-07-2014, 01:43 AM
RE: Bigger is not better.
(14-07-2014 12:26 AM)BlackMason Wrote:  
(13-07-2014 06:11 PM)Dom Wrote:  I don't know about dyslexia, I think I heard it is easier to work with within the confines of common schooling than dyscalculia. Dyscalculia makes basic math all but impossible, but it does nicely with geometry and such.

Just because someone doesn't do things the way you have been taught to do them doesn't mean they can't do better than you in the end. Tongue

I've never seen or dealt with dyscalculia. I may be outta line but I'd rank dyslexia higher than a maths issue simply because reading is the foundation of literacy. I you can read you can pretty much teach yourself anything. You don't need maths to live as you describe. Congratulations on beating one of god's many fuck ups by the way.

First, it's not surprising that you haven't dealt with dyscalculia before; it's not very well known and nowhere near as studied as dyslexia is and doesn't get diagnosed very often, despite it being as potent an issue as it's linguistic cousin.

And yeah, it does make you seem a tad out of line when you say dyscalculia ranks less than dyslexia as it's 'a maths issue', which reads outright dismissive. It's not like dyscalculics are just bad at math; they suffer almost the same problems that dyslexics do, just in terms of anything relating to numbers as opposed to letters. At least dyslexia is well known enough for decent support to be around (depending on where you are, of course).

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14-07-2014, 02:47 AM
RE: Bigger is not better.
I'm sorry I wasn't going for dismissive. My point was merely that with discalculia one has options. You could become a lawyer where you don't really have to deal with lots of numbers. But with dyslexia almost everything is a road block. The way colleges work is that you gotta read for your degree.

8000 years before Jesus, the Egyptian god Horus said, "I am the way, the truth, the life."
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16-07-2014, 03:18 AM
RE: Bigger is not better.
I should add for those saying that dyslexia is treatable: While I do agree, I should mention that in a developing country the costs are exorbitant.

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16-07-2014, 03:35 AM
RE: Bigger is not better.
(16-07-2014 03:18 AM)BlackMason Wrote:  I should add for those saying that dyslexia is treatable: While I do agree, I should mention that in a developing country the costs are exorbitant.

Dyslexia doesn't mean that you can't read full stop. It just means you have difficulty. It means that given the means and opportunity there's a neurological problem which still prevents one from learning to read and write *easily*. It doesn't mean that it's impossible.

The wikipedia article on dyslexia is quite informative.

I think, that if the costs of special needs teaching are too high, then yonder kiddo is gonna have to just vasbyt and work hard Wink It sucks, given that *with* the special education (s)he might make faster progress, but the achievement is all the greater when (s)he overcomes it.

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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16-07-2014, 06:13 AM (This post was last modified: 16-07-2014 06:20 AM by Dom.)
RE: Bigger is not better.
(14-07-2014 12:26 AM)BlackMason Wrote:  
(13-07-2014 06:11 PM)Dom Wrote:  I don't know about dyslexia, I think I heard it is easier to work with within the confines of common schooling than dyscalculia. Dyscalculia makes basic math all but impossible, but it does nicely with geometry and such.

Just because someone doesn't do things the way you have been taught to do them doesn't mean they can't do better than you in the end. Tongue

I've never seen or dealt with dyscalculia. I may be outta line but I'd rank dyslexia higher than a maths issue simply because reading is the foundation of literacy. I you can read you can pretty much teach yourself anything. You don't need maths to live as you describe. Congratulations on beating one of god's many fuck ups by the way.

Dyscalculia affects different people in different ways, in my case numbers go in one ear and out the other, can't remember them from one second to the next. They seem to go into some sub-conscious part of my brain though. There are people who don't have a concept of what they mean at all, which is worse.

Dyscalculia can mean that you don't know your house number, phone number, social security number and what have you. It can mean you have trouble paying for things with cash.

A disorder just means that you don't process things the same way the norm does. In the case of "learning disorders" it means that related normal school teaching doesn't work for you. It does NOT mean that you are unable to process letters or numbers, it just means that you do it differently.

If he can't get any help with this, you need to encourage him to think outside the box. One thing you personally can do is to get with him and read a complete definition of dyslexia to him, and also any individual accounts of people who conquered the issue. I bet you will find them online for dyslexia, not so much for dyscalculia. The thing is to get him thinking about what is happening in his head so he can find a way around it. He can still get the same results as a person without the disorder, albeit by using a "detour" to get there. Help him find it. The more he knows about dyslexia, the easier it will be for him to circumvent it.

Also, find and use as many audio books as you can. If you can find the book and audio at the same time, have him look at the words while he hears them and says them out loud. The "detour" may become obvious to him after sufficient exposure.

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