Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
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30-03-2017, 09:17 PM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
(30-03-2017 09:13 PM)jennybee Wrote:  
(30-03-2017 09:07 PM)ImFred Wrote:  If you're fat the most important thing is to not let yourself get any fatter. Do what it takes to move in the right direction. Being fat is hard work.

Fortunately, I've never been someone who's been overweight, so I can only speculate that if someone who is overweight is consistently overeating, chances are, they are going to end up gaining more weight. I think if it is a biological reason for weight gain or a psychological one, addtl. weight gain is a likely possibility.

For most people, like myself, the initial weight gain was through gluttony. But putting some of back on is easy as... pie.
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30-03-2017, 10:30 PM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
(30-03-2017 09:14 PM)ImFred Wrote:  
(30-03-2017 09:06 PM)jennybee Wrote:  Very true re: biological reasons. I was more mentioning psychological issues in response to A's post about Biggest Loser People, who were physically able to lose weight, but then ended up gaining it back within a year or two.

Those fat cells are designed to fill themselves back up so it takes a lot of discipline to keep it off. If you're 100lbs overweight pretty much the best you can hope for is to be 30 lbs overweight and it's a real bitch to keep it that way. But it's a combination of psychological and physiological, of course.

I'm quite happy to disagree with that, and aractus's surmise. Let's revisit this thread a year from now, I'll tell you how it went for me.
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30-03-2017, 11:04 PM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
Good luck to both of us then because I'm still trying to shed excess blubber.
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31-03-2017, 12:02 AM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
(30-03-2017 09:06 PM)jennybee Wrote:  Very true re: biological reasons. I was more mentioning psychological issues in response to A's post about Biggest Loser People, who were physically able to lose weight, but then ended up gaining it back within a year or two.

Biggest Loser people have their bodies abused and as a result of severe deprivation they lose weight. But even if you do it the "right way" it doesn't stay off. Here's the 650-lb virgin (2009 documentary):





I'll summarise it: In 2003 David Elmore Smith (the 650lb virgin) weighs in at 295kg/650lbs. He sends an email to a news station, pleading for help, and then he works with a personal trainer named Chris Powell. Over the course of six years he looses ~200kg. They claim to become best friends:





Then he had surgery to remove the skin folds.

Then in just 3 years he gained the weight back, all of it (he peaked in 2013 at 600lbs, the extra 50 we can put down to the surgical removal of skin and fat), and as predicted his "best friend" deserted him.





It took him 10 years to gain the weight the first time, it took him 6 years to lose it, and it took only 3 years for him to re-gain it. Do the maths. If his lifestyle was the only factor in regaining weight then it should have taken him 10 years, not 3, to gain the weight back. The fact is his body learned that 650lbs is normal, and that's what it wants to weight. Whenever it can it stores fat, and tells him he's hungry.

Even gastric bypass and lap-bands don't work long-term.

I do think it's sad that he blames himself. Don't get me wrong, he can probably sustain a reasonable weightloss, but there's no way he can get back to a healthy weight (below 25 BMI) and stay there.

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31-03-2017, 01:08 AM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
(30-03-2017 08:29 PM)Larai19 Wrote:  I thought it would be interesting to see what the forum's opinion on this.
If someone is morbidly obese and it is impacting their health viciously in a negative way, but said person was okay with that and appreciated their body, should someone intervene and try to convince that person to lose weight?

Person in question is probably aware of how negatively obesity affects his quality of life so I don't see much sense in telling said person what to do with their life.

I don't care about people being fat, not my body so not my concern. I was fat (over 90kg) and now I'm not (about 64kg) so I know that losing weight isn't pipe dream. It's not easy and require change of eating habits but it is possible. I prefer being slim but other people choices in this matter aren't something that keeps me awake at night.

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31-03-2017, 03:57 AM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
If they're happy... it's their choice. I know I couldn't be happy like that. I just don't know how people manage. I mean, it's hard enough dragging my 80 kg carcass around, I can't imagine how hard it would be to add another 80 kg and then still have to work and move around.

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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31-03-2017, 04:48 AM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
(30-03-2017 09:03 PM)ImFred Wrote:  
(30-03-2017 08:38 PM)jennybee Wrote:  That's because often times people lose weight without dealing with the underlying problem (which can be psychological in nature) as with any addiction.

There's biological reasons as well. After you add fat cells they stick and short of the most Ethiopian efforts they hold on to about 30% of their mass.

Ethiopian efforts? Consider

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31-03-2017, 05:05 AM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
I don't think there should be an intervention if it's an adult because I think adults should do whatever they want with their own bodies as long as they're not harming anyone else.

If it's a child that's morbidly obese however... if it's the parents fault I think they should be charged with child neglect.
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31-03-2017, 06:18 AM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
I used to hire people to do online work from their homes. Most had one disability or another. One guy weighed 600 pounds and was bedridden.

I watched him lose 100 pounds a year, over a 3 year period. He started each day determined to make it a better day than the one before. His resolve was amazing. He was eating "normal" amounts of foods, healthy foods. Once he was able, he would walk for 10 minutes every half hour. (luckily it didn't matter to the biz when he worked, just that the work would get done, so he had the freedom.)

After losing half of his entire weight, he had a nervous break down and was hospitalized. Ate hospital food and gained 50 pounds in two weeks. On sucky hospital food! Took him a year to get it off again.

Then I sold the biz 4 years ago and didn't hear from him until last month. We chatted, he was living in rehab. He weighed 400 pounds and trying to get back down to 300. He told me that he had been crying himself to sleep every night since he realized that this was to be his life. He was 40 by then. Every day, all day, is a struggle. The only time he is not hungry is while he is moving. So he walks, struggling, sweating, and having youngsters make fun of him in the streets.

It is so sad. I am convinced that one day we will find the actual causes of obesity, I am convinced that there are different ones for different people and that we just don't know shit. I am convinced that at least some are hard wired to be fat - mother evolution playing her game.

Watching him struggle all these years, and hearing about the way people treat him and judge him (he does NOT eat a carton of eggs and a package of bacon for breakfast, he eats plain yoghurt with fresh fruit!!!!) opened my eyes to this.

Personally, I can control my weight. It corresponds to the way I eat, albeit as one gets older, it becomes harder to lose weight, regardless of diet and exercise.

But for some of us it is hell. I think fat people are misunderstood and inadvertently tortured by (perhaps) well meaning people who think they know what they are talking about. And I think we don't know shit about that and would do well not to judge.

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31-03-2017, 07:05 AM
RE: Body Acceptance and the Morbidly Obese
(31-03-2017 12:02 AM)Aractus Wrote:  
(30-03-2017 09:06 PM)jennybee Wrote:  Very true re: biological reasons. I was more mentioning psychological issues in response to A's post about Biggest Loser People, who were physically able to lose weight, but then ended up gaining it back within a year or two.

Biggest Loser people have their bodies abused and as a result of severe deprivation they lose weight. But even if you do it the "right way" it doesn't stay off. Here's the 650-lb virgin (2009 documentary):





I'll summarise it: In 2003 David Elmore Smith (the 650lb virgin) weighs in at 295kg/650lbs. He sends an email to a news station, pleading for help, and then he works with a personal trainer named Chris Powell. Over the course of six years he looses ~200kg. They claim to become best friends:





Then he had surgery to remove the skin folds.

Then in just 3 years he gained the weight back, all of it (he peaked in 2013 at 600lbs, the extra 50 we can put down to the surgical removal of skin and fat), and as predicted his "best friend" deserted him.





It took him 10 years to gain the weight the first time, it took him 6 years to lose it, and it took only 3 years for him to re-gain it. Do the maths. If his lifestyle was the only factor in regaining weight then it should have taken him 10 years, not 3, to gain the weight back. The fact is his body learned that 650lbs is normal, and that's what it wants to weight. Whenever it can it stores fat, and tells him he's hungry.

Even gastric bypass and lap-bands don't work long-term.

I do think it's sad that he blames himself. Don't get me wrong, he can probably sustain a reasonable weightloss, but there's no way he can get back to a healthy weight (below 25 BMI) and stay there.

I remember that story. I'm not saying it isn't easier to gain weight back if you were previously overweight--I'm saying that if you don't address the underlying problems, you can easily get back to old lifestyle habits and gain weight back.

If I am remembering correctly, he said he was sexually abused and it was the reason he turned to food in the first place, then even after weight loss--because he didn't deal with psychological trauma--he went back to old habits. Could his body have more easily gained the weight back due to being previously overweight? Yes. But the impetus was the psychological trauma.
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