Poll: Body Autonomy & Self Termination
Yes, anyone should have the right to choose to die.
No, no one should have the right to choose to die.
Yes, but only people who are terminal should have the right to die as they choose.
I don't care one way or another.
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Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
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27-02-2016, 09:44 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
(27-02-2016 07:25 PM)Heatheness Wrote:  
(27-02-2016 06:46 PM)Fireball Wrote:  I like Bucky's answer, and I voted for allowing anyone to terminate. However, if a person has some mental condition that is causing suicidal thoughts that can be mediated with medication, I'd want that tried first.

If they are agreeable to that, yes, if not then no. The point for me is that no matter what, you and you alone have the right to decide even if that decision is not what others want. I wouldn't want my kids to have more say on my life than I do even if I was mentally ill. Some people can't face their children or the guilt that might accompany that.

But I would make one stipulation and that is you must be an adult to make that call. If it is in the case of a child, then the child must be terminally ill.

If there were more painless and safer ways to end you life by going to professional doctors I think it would be so much better than trying to do it yourself. You could do it in the comfort of your own home without worrying your family will find you. So many things to consider that would be better if you could select this and do it with competent help.

I've had some tough times in my life, but never considered suicide as a solution, except as one option of many, and dispensed with that one early on. As I age, I can see the friends I've known winking out, one after another due to age. I don't even want to live a life of agony like my mother and one younger brother did, before they died of cancer and emphysema. I'm not chicken for pain, I've experienced plenty. But if I'm at an advanced age and the cost of keeping me alive gets too high (emotionally and economically for my family), I want to be gone. They are going to grieve, no matter what. Were I in the reciprocal situation, I'd want their suffering to end. It serves no purpose. As far as ending my own life, I can assure you I know many painless ways that don't require medical intervention of any sort and wouldn't leave a mess for my family. I have no plans for that anytime soon. I'm still a leaping buck; I just need a couple of tries, sometimes.
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27-02-2016, 09:50 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
(27-02-2016 09:44 PM)Fireball Wrote:  I've had some tough times in my life, but never considered suicide as a solution, except as one option of many,

“The absurd man will not commit suicide; he wants to live, without relinquishing any of his certainty, without a future, without hope, without illusions … and without resignation either. He stares at death with passionate attention and this fascination liberates him. He experiences the “divine irresponsibility” of the condemned man." - Sartre

#sigh
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27-02-2016, 09:51 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
This is a tricky issue. My grandmother is 94, has dementia, lives everyday in pain, and has difficulty preforming basic tasks. She wants to die, and I think that she has a right too. She has no quality of life, and has no chance of a better life in the future. But, I have also know people that have been in a bad spot in life. One attempted suicide and fail. He has since gotten better, and is deeply grateful that he failed. I don't know if could say it's okay for someone kill themselves if their life could get better, or if they would regret the trying to kill themself later.
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27-02-2016, 09:53 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
We should have the right to choose when its our time to tap out. However I would hope someone would seek help if they are feeling that way, as death is very final.

I live in Oregon which was the first state to have right to death laws, they are strict but I'm glad they are there for the terminally ill.
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27-02-2016, 10:29 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
Sounds almost terrible...but I really don't care.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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27-02-2016, 10:31 PM (This post was last modified: 27-02-2016 10:35 PM by Escape Artist.)
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
(27-02-2016 06:46 PM)Fireball Wrote:  I like Bucky's answer, and I voted for allowing anyone to terminate. However, if a person has some mental condition that is causing suicidal thoughts that can be mediated with medication, I'd want that tried first.

Agreed. This is my position on it. If someone is depressed and can be treated for that, I don't think we should let that person have the choice to kill themselves, as they aren't thinking straight (if one can put it that way). I think that, on the other side of the situation after having had necessary measures taken to get them better (meds, therapy) then they would be glad of someone having stopped them from taking their own life.

ETA: so my vote is anyone, but with the caveat above...

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27-02-2016, 10:32 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
My body, my decision.
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27-02-2016, 11:10 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
(27-02-2016 09:50 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(27-02-2016 09:44 PM)Fireball Wrote:  I've had some tough times in my life, but never considered suicide as a solution, except as one option of many,

“The absurd man will not commit suicide; he wants to live, without relinquishing any of his certainty, without a future, without hope, without illusions … and without resignation either. He stares at death with passionate attention and this fascination liberates him. He experiences the “divine irresponsibility” of the condemned man." - Sartre

Damned straight! Not sure I like the description of "absurd", though. I have faced life head-on, with scars (mental and physical) from some bad collisions as evidence. I will still do so, and, if I have the chance, Death is getting the bird as I go down, mouthing curses at that final indignity. Angry RAGE AGAINST THE NIGHT! Tongue
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27-02-2016, 11:32 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
But some tire of the constant struggle and only want peace. I agree if you want to fight the good fight but why should anyone be forced to do so?

If nothing else we should get to own our death.

[Image: dnw9krH.jpg?4]
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27-02-2016, 11:39 PM
RE: Body Autonomy, How Far Should That Extend?
My issue is that once people end their life it can't be undone. I don't want to encourage someone to end their life if it's something that they would regret, if they had lived. I don't want to see people make a mistake. The problem with that is how can anyone know if they would regret it. Of course once they are dead they can no longer regret it.
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