Book recommendations anyone?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
01-07-2012, 04:35 AM
Book recommendations anyone?
I'm ashamed to admit that I wasn't such a good student when it comes to math, which in turn prevent me from learning biology and physics in highschool. So... I brought Dawkins' "Magic of Reality" and I'm about to finish it, I learnt some things from it and it answered questions I had (like how we know what distant stars are made of, which is really awesome considering that we can't even get anywhere near those stars).

So I'm asking you to recommend me some books about evolution and astronomy. I want to buy "Astronomy Today", but it costs abit too much for me so I'll postpone it to a later time.

Then again, perhaps I can't understand much from other books without much basis about physics and biology?

Btw, you can also recommend me some history books about humanity (there's this good book written in Hebrew that covers anything from 70,000 years ago up until now, but it costs too much in Shekels and wasn't translated to English unfortunately)
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-07-2012, 10:14 AM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
(01-07-2012 04:35 AM)Vlad Wrote:  I'm ashamed to admit that I wasn't such a good student when it comes to math, which in turn prevent me from learning biology and physics in highschool. So... I brought Dawkins' "Magic of Reality" and I'm about to finish it, I learnt some things from it and it answered questions I had (like how we know what distant stars are made of, which is really awesome considering that we can't even get anywhere near those stars).

So I'm asking you to recommend me some books about evolution and astronomy. I want to buy "Astronomy Today", but it costs abit too much for me so I'll postpone it to a later time.

Then again, perhaps I can't understand much from other books without much basis about physics and biology?

Btw, you can also recommend me some history books about humanity (there's this good book written in Hebrew that covers anything from 70,000 years ago up until now, but it costs too much in Shekels and wasn't translated to English unfortunately)
First, buying books, especially used, on Amazon.com will make your shekels stretchier.

A good start is Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything, especially the illustrated version. This book will get you in the mood to go exploring science - all of it.

There are lots of good books on math and science that were written for the non-technical. You will build up a base of understanding and will seek out more challenging books as you learn.

Have fun; the joy is in the journey.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Chas's post
01-07-2012, 11:17 AM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
Thanks.

For some reason Amazon hasn't been working for me for some time now (over a year as far as I remember). I intended on buying Cosmos, but couldn't find any recent publications of it on Bookdepository (my main site for buying books).

So in the meantime I bought Guns, Germs, and Steel which was recommended to me on another board.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-07-2012, 05:56 PM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
I really like Lisa Randall's Warped Passages. She did a good job, covers some particle physics, string theory, kept it interesting and didn't overload on math. I also recommend Kip Thorne's Black Holes and Time Warps.

Enjoy whatever you pick up.

" Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous."
David Hume
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-07-2012, 06:04 PM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
Another good one is Carl Sagan's The Demon-Haunted World - Science as a Candle in the Dark.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Chas's post
01-07-2012, 07:38 PM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
I'm planning my next book to be Karen Armstrong's The History of God.

It might fit your desire for history, since the history of the god construct is part of human history.

"All that is necessary for the triumph of Calvinism is that good Atheists do nothing." ~Eric Oh My
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-07-2012, 08:43 PM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
(01-07-2012 07:38 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  I'm planning my next book to be Karen Armstrong's The History of God.

It might fit your desire for history, since the history of the god construct is part of human history.

That's a book I was looking for Smile
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-07-2012, 09:01 PM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
(01-07-2012 07:38 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  I'm planning my next book to be Karen Armstrong's The History of God.

It might fit your desire for history, since the history of the god construct is part of human history.

There are a number of You Tube videos by and about Karen Armstrong, and this book.





I just started Penrose's Cycles of Time. He thinks maybe the WMAP could show there are "remnant" ripples from Black Hole collisions in previous universes. (He admits it's crazy). Penrose is always tough sledding, if you want to really get a handle on exactly everything he's saying. So I only do a little a day. It's good brain exercise. Even just getting through his explanation of the Pythagorean Theorem, (in The Road to Reality), was a challenge, (for dummies like moi).

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating yogi, CAAT-LY.
Yeah, for verily I say unto thee, and this we know : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Bucky Ball's post
02-07-2012, 07:05 AM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
I'm no biologist, but a lot of other Dawkin's books (esp the blind watchmaker) were a good fit. There were times when it pushed the envelope for me but I never felt overwhelmed.

Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, on the other hand, resists all of my attempts to get into it.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-07-2012, 05:23 PM
RE: Book recommendations anyone?
I just bought a bunch of books, I've yet to finish them (I'm only a couple chapters deep in a couple), but maybe this will help:
  • Why Evolution is True - Jerry A. Coyne: So far, it's a good overview or bird's eye view of evolution and what evidence we have that it is true. Very easy read (IMO), but doesn't go into extreme detail.
  • Why I am Not a Christian - Bertrand Russell: You've probably already read the essay (or watched a YouTube video of it), but it's simply a collection of his thoughts on religion, his arguments against it, etc. (the essay is just the 1st chapter)
  • The Portable Atheist - Ed. Christopher Hitchens: Collection of writings by some well known and some not as well known atheist authors. I've yet to get far into this one though.
  • The Moral Landscape - Sam Harris: Argues that morality has purely scientific origins and that we can use science to make a case for basic morality.
  • The Demon Haunted World - Carl Sagan: Sagan essentially goes through various topics of "woo" such as UFOs, faith healing and pseudo-science and demonstrates how to think skeptically about the world around us.
  • A Brief History of Time - Stephen Hawking: Explains cosmology (big bang, etc) to the non-specialist reader.
All of these were less then $35 on Amazon.com combined Big Grin

Better without God, and happier too.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Azaraith's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: