Books <3
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31-05-2014, 02:14 PM
Books <3
I'd like some suggestions for books. I want to do some self-edumacation. Particularly in the areas of philosophy, psychology, and -eek- maths. My working knowledge of maths is poor, to say the least, so I'll need something that covers the basics well. I'll be heading to the library shortly, so any early responses would be appreciated. Thanks!
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31-05-2014, 02:16 PM
RE: Books <3
[Image: The-Red-Queen-Sed-and-the-Evolution-of-H...98x600.jpg]

Got to read a good science book. Drinking Beverage

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31-05-2014, 02:23 PM
RE: Books <3
Thanks. I did a quick check of my libraries database and it doesn't contain this book. However, there are Matt Ridley books:

[Image: MC.GIF&amp;client=vancoirl&amp;t...;amp;oclc=]
Life is getting better--and at an accelerating rate. Food availability, income, and life span are up; disease, child mortality, and violence are down -- all across the globe. Though the world is far from perfect, necessities and luxuries alike are getting cheaper; population growth is slowing; Africa is following Asia out of poverty; the Internet, the mobile phone, and container shipping are enriching people's lives as never before. The pessimists who dominate public discourse insist that we will soon reach a turning point and things will start to get worse. But they have been saying this for two hundred years. Yet Matt Ridley does more than describe how things are getting better. He explains why. Prosperity comes from everybody working for everybody else. The habit of exchange and specialization--which started more than 100,000 years ago--has created a collective brain that sets human living standards on a rising trend. The mutual dependence, trust, and sharing that result are causes for hope, not despair. This bold book covers the entire sweep of human history, from the Stone Age to the Internet, from the stagnation of the Ming empire to the invention of the steam engine, from the population explosion to the likely consequences of climate change. It ends with a confident assertion that thanks to the ceaseless capacity of the human race for innovative change, and despite inevitable disasters along the way, the twenty-first century will see both human prosperity and natural biodiversity enhanced.


[Image: MC.GIF&amp;client=vancoirl&amp;t...;amp;oclc=]
Francis Crick-the quiet genius who led a revolution in biology by discovering, quite literally, the secret of life-will be bracketed with Galileo, Darwin, and Einstein as one of the greatest scientists of all time. In his fascinating biography of the scientific pioneer who uncovered the genetic code-the digital cipher at the heart of heredity that distinguishes living from non-living things-acclaimed bestselling science writer Matt Ridley traces Crick's life from middle-class mediocrity in the English Midlands through a lackluster education and six years designing magnetic mines for the Royal Navy to his leap into biology at the age of thirty-one and its astonishing consequences. In the process, Ridley sheds a brilliant light on the man who forever changed our world and how we understand it.
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31-05-2014, 02:30 PM
RE: Books <3
(31-05-2014 02:23 PM)Gilgamesh Wrote:  Thanks. I did a quick check of my libraries database and it doesn't contain this book. However, there are Matt Ridley books:

[Image: MC.GIF&amp;client=vancoirl&amp;t...;amp;oclc=]
Life is getting better--and at an accelerating rate. Food availability, income, and life span are up; disease, child mortality, and violence are down -- all across the globe. Though the world is far from perfect, necessities and luxuries alike are getting cheaper; population growth is slowing; Africa is following Asia out of poverty; the Internet, the mobile phone, and container shipping are enriching people's lives as never before. The pessimists who dominate public discourse insist that we will soon reach a turning point and things will start to get worse. But they have been saying this for two hundred years. Yet Matt Ridley does more than describe how things are getting better. He explains why. Prosperity comes from everybody working for everybody else. The habit of exchange and specialization--which started more than 100,000 years ago--has created a collective brain that sets human living standards on a rising trend. The mutual dependence, trust, and sharing that result are causes for hope, not despair. This bold book covers the entire sweep of human history, from the Stone Age to the Internet, from the stagnation of the Ming empire to the invention of the steam engine, from the population explosion to the likely consequences of climate change. It ends with a confident assertion that thanks to the ceaseless capacity of the human race for innovative change, and despite inevitable disasters along the way, the twenty-first century will see both human prosperity and natural biodiversity enhanced.


[Image: MC.GIF&amp;client=vancoirl&amp;t...;amp;oclc=]
Francis Crick-the quiet genius who led a revolution in biology by discovering, quite literally, the secret of life-will be bracketed with Galileo, Darwin, and Einstein as one of the greatest scientists of all time. In his fascinating biography of the scientific pioneer who uncovered the genetic code-the digital cipher at the heart of heredity that distinguishes living from non-living things-acclaimed bestselling science writer Matt Ridley traces Crick's life from middle-class mediocrity in the English Midlands through a lackluster education and six years designing magnetic mines for the Royal Navy to his leap into biology at the age of thirty-one and its astonishing consequences. In the process, Ridley sheds a brilliant light on the man who forever changed our world and how we understand it.

The rest of the things I have are scientific papers, mostly in biology. I can share some if you like.

[Image: Guilmon-41189.gif] https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOW_Ioi2wtuPa88FvBmnBgQ my youtube
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31-05-2014, 03:53 PM (This post was last modified: 31-05-2014 03:57 PM by Chas.)
RE: Books <3
(31-05-2014 02:14 PM)Gilgamesh Wrote:  I'd like some suggestions for books. I want to do some self-edumacation. Particularly in the areas of philosophy, psychology, and -eek- maths. My working knowledge of maths is poor, to say the least, so I'll need something that covers the basics well. I'll be heading to the library shortly, so any early responses would be appreciated. Thanks!

You have high school level maths and science, I presume.

I suggest going to Wikipedia to read about various philosophies. There are references in the articles for further reading.

As for psychology, first you need to understand evolution.

Maths. Hmm, what do you feel you need to know? An educated person should understand first-order logic, algebra, plane geometry,
basic trigonometry, basic calculus concepts, and basic probability and statistics.

Logic for making an argument or drawing a conclusion.
Algebra and geometry to solve real world, everyday problems.
Trigonometry as a tool for navigation, astronomy, and to understand light waves, the seasons.
Basic calculus concepts to understand basic physical laws.
Probability and statistics to assess risk and not get fooled.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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31-05-2014, 04:03 PM
RE: Books <3
(31-05-2014 03:53 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(31-05-2014 02:14 PM)Gilgamesh Wrote:  I'd like some suggestions for books. I want to do some self-edumacation. Particularly in the areas of philosophy, psychology, and -eek- maths. My working knowledge of maths is poor, to say the least, so I'll need something that covers the basics well. I'll be heading to the library shortly, so any early responses would be appreciated. Thanks!

You have high school level maths and science, I presume.

I suggest going to Wikipedia to read about various philosophies. There are references in the articles for further reading.

As for psychology, first you need to understand evolution.

Maths. Hmm, what do you feel you need to know? An educated person should understand first-order logic, algebra, plane geometry,
basic trigonometry, basic calculus concepts, and basic probability and statistics.

Logic for making an argument or drawing a conclusion.
Algebra and geometry to solve real world, everyday problems.
Trigonometry as a tool for navigation, astronomy, and to understand light waves, the seasons.
Basic calculus concepts to understand basic physical laws.
Probability and statistics to assess risk and not get fooled.

Speaking of human evolution for psychology mind if I give it a start?

http://www.cell.com/trends/cognitive-sci...13)00221-0

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31-05-2014, 04:31 PM
RE: Books <3
On Truth: The Tyranny of Illusion
We are born to truth, yet everywhere we are enmeshed in error. Superstition, irrationality and patriotism all work to cripple our natural affinities to rationality and empiricism.
This book, by Stefan Molyneux, host of Freedomain Radio, examines and explodes all the propaganda that stands between you and the simple truth of life, the universe and everything. All the truths that you were born with, that were scrubbed out of your mind for the profit and fun of your elders, will be reawakened in this short but powerful book.
Begin the process of reclaiming your own reason, pick up this book, hold on for the ride, and arrive at the truth.


(Warning: this is a short, but the most painful book I've ever read. I especially recommend if you think there is no such thing as powerful and painful books, or that a mere book can't turn your life upside down)


Real-Time Relationships: The Logic of Love
The first commandment of Socrates was: "Know Thyself." Real-Time Relationships by Stefan Molyneux, host of Freedomain Radio, provides the second commandment: "Speak Thy Truth." The first virtue is always honesty, but speaking immediate emotional experiences in intimate relationships can be enormously challenging.

Real-Time Relationships addresses the how and the why of true intimacy in love, friendship, politics and work. Bring the power of authentic honesty to all of your personal relationships, and reap the rewards of love, loyalty and security for the rest of your life!


(this is another life-turning book. This is philosophy and psychology at its finest. I'd say it even trumps sciences like genetics or evolutionary psychology in practical usefulness in life.)
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31-05-2014, 05:04 PM
RE: Books <3
Ignore the Molyneux books suggested by Luminon.

For philosophy there's so much history (Classic, Islamic, medieval, etc) and different theories and schools of thought (Analytic, Empirical, Existentialist, Realist, Fatalist, etc) that like Chas said. Wikipedia might be your best friend in contrasting the ideas and referencing more detailed essays, books and lectures for your consideration.

Since I just re read your question and you said you were going to the library, something on philosophical history will be helpful to start.

Psychology, Steven Pinker I would definitely recommend.

Math, a standard textbook depending on what level you're at.

“The reason people use a crucifix against vampires is because vampires are allergic to bullshit.” ― Richard Pryor
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31-05-2014, 07:15 PM (This post was last modified: 31-05-2014 07:31 PM by Luminon.)
RE: Books <3
(31-05-2014 05:04 PM)djkamilo Wrote:  Ignore the Molyneux books suggested by Luminon.
I don't understand why do you say that. If you've got something against me, my judgement or my stuff, say it. If you can put it into words. Use PM, if you want, but grant me at least that much respect and be direct.
Is there a reason why everyone recommends history of philosophy instead of philosophy? The Gilgamesh's request didn't strike me as particularly formal or academical, except the math textbook.
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31-05-2014, 07:15 PM
RE: Books <3
I don't have high school maths. I never finished high school. I'm eager to learn.

As for philosophy, I don't necessarily want to read on specific schools of philosophy, but just reading current philosophers interpretation and conjectures about them.

I have read A short History of Philosophy, by Solomon Robert C., and Connections to the world - the basic concepts of philosophy, by Arthur C. Danto, and a couple of other short books on philosophy, (rather, an interpretations of Plato's Republic, and a book called The Death of Socrates.)

Thanks again, guys!

Edit: I'm also interested in language and logic.
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