British colloquialisms
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26-03-2017, 10:45 AM
British colloquialisms
I just came off of a comment section that had many UK citizens. I just love the British and their colloquialisms. I've used "panties in a twist" many times. I guess the Brits say "knickers in a twist" but "panties" has the same visual impact, which I like. My step grandmother was from the UK. I never knew her but her sayings got handed down through my mother. "Up yours with a giggy stick" is one of my favorites that my mother would say. "Shit on the shores of Shanghai" was another.

In the comment section I was just on there was... "It just boils my piss". I LOVE that saying!

But I'd like more. Can some of you UK folks add some more? I'd love to hear them. Big Grin

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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26-03-2017, 10:52 AM (This post was last modified: 26-03-2017 01:50 PM by onlinebiker.)
RE: British colloquialisms
The first time I had a Brit asked if he "could bum a fag", I replied -

" I suppose. Tell him you're straight".


Heh

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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26-03-2017, 11:03 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(26-03-2017 10:52 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  The first time I had a Brit as if he "could bum a fag", I replied -

" I suppose. Tell him you're straight".


Heh

That could be a lot worse.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
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26-03-2017, 11:19 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(26-03-2017 11:03 AM)JDog554 Wrote:  
(26-03-2017 10:52 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  The first time I had a Brit as if he "could bum a fag", I replied -

" I suppose. Tell him you're straight".


Heh

That could be a lot worse.


Faggot is also a sewing stitch. There's a button on my computerized sewing machine called "faggoting". It joins two pieces of materials together in a flat, decorative seam.






But my mother called cigarettes faggots. Probably taken from the bundle of stick. What about "twat", that sounds British?

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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26-03-2017, 11:19 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
I always find myself suppressing laughter when listening to anything in, what I consider, British English. You always get the impression that there is joke being told, even if you may have missed it.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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26-03-2017, 11:23 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
"Up the creek without a paddle" / "Up shit creek" - in trouble

I know tons more but my mind has gone blank!

I have a website here which discusses the issues and terminology surrounding religion and atheism. It's hopefully user friendly to all.
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26-03-2017, 12:43 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
One thing I've noticed about the difference between American and British English is that Brits have a bath and take some tea, while Americans take a bath and have some tea.

Something Sam Clemens said.
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26-03-2017, 01:22 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
I do love some of the Southern US insults. "Dumber than a box of rocks" seems to be a southern phrase. I've used this in reference to many a theist. Thumbsup I came across this one the other day.... "one sandwich short of a picnic."

Ok, this was a stupid thread but I still like British insults and phrases. Just sayin. Tongue

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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26-03-2017, 01:32 PM (This post was last modified: 28-03-2017 02:32 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: British colloquialisms
The funniest thing I ever heard was Diana Rigg say, in one of her mysteries, (as an explanation for why she got in trouble, or why someone was mad at her about her having an affair),

"Well .... I was not altogether entirely unmarried".
Totally British. Laugh out loadLaugh out load

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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26-03-2017, 01:33 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
Not sure if these are British or not...

Bugger me sideways with a fish fork - an expression of surprise

Face like a smacked arse - miserable looking

Jam spangled fuck pig - lucky person

Wanker/tosser/muppet - someone who is a bit of an idiot



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